An Eye on New Media
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An Eye on New Media
New Media in Society, Business & Classrooms
Curated by Ken Morrison
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Building Jarvis

Building Jarvis | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:
Mark Zuckerberg uses Facebook Notes to share what he learned from a year of trying to create an artificial intelligence home management computer.

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Exclusive: Google, Facebook quietly move toward automatic blocking of extremist videos

Exclusive: Google, Facebook quietly move toward automatic blocking of extremist videos | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
By Joseph Menn and Dustin Volz SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Some of the web’s biggest destinations for watching videos have quietly started using automation to remove extremist content from their sites, according to two people familiar with the process. The move is a major step forward for
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Facebook’s Troubling One-Way Mirror

Facebook’s Troubling One-Way Mirror | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
The social network requires a level of trust from its users as it seeks to “make the world more open and connected.” But how open is it willing to be?
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What No One Is Telling You About Mark Zuckerberg Donating 99% Of His Fortune To "Charity"

What No One Is Telling You About Mark Zuckerberg Donating 99% Of His Fortune To "Charity" | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
It's neither exclusively a charity, nor is his donation is going to a "charitable trust."
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Self-Promoters Tend to Misjudge How Annoying They Are to Others - Association for Psychological Science

Self-Promoters Tend to Misjudge How Annoying They Are to Others - Association for Psychological Science | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
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This PROVES (/sarcasm) that I have always been right! How Facebook polarizes us.

This PROVES (/sarcasm) that I have always been right!   How Facebook polarizes us. | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Today in Science, members of the Facebook data science team released a provocative study about adult Facebook users in the US "who volunteer their ideological affiliation in their profile." The stu...
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Facebook and the Feed - stratechery by Ben Thompson

Facebook and the Feed - stratechery by Ben Thompson | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Facebook made a change to their news feed to prioritize friend content. I'm not sure that's the optimal strategy if they want to own attention.
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How Mark Zuckerberg Started - His Life Visualized

How Mark Zuckerberg Started - His Life Visualized | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg meets a computer

His father, although not an engineer, was an early computer enthusiast. Running a dental office he had a vision that computers would change the way people communicate. But for the time being he used them for taking scanning people’s mouths. At age 10 Mark was bored with school. His father noticed and introduced him to his Altair computer. Together they wrote a program that connected the computer at home with the computer in the office. They called it “ZuckNet.” It alerted doctor Z, as he is known, when a patient arrived. It worked better than having the receptionist yell, “Patient here!”

Mark Zuckerberg starts hacking

Mark quickly learned everything his father knew about computers. He started studying with a tutor. Then he started taking a college class in computer science while still in middle school. He read books. But he really started learning to code when he transferred to a private school where he met a programming whiz kid Adam D’Angelo. Together they started hacking. They made an artificially intelligent music player that learned the user’s music taste. Soon Microsoft found out about it and offered money and a job. Zuckerberg was not interested.

There is a running theme in how Mark Zuckerberg started. He would be offered millions and even billions at least 11 times since then, and every time he walked away. He might have a bigger plan every time.
Source: The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World

Read more on: ent, entrepreneurship, mark zuckerberg
Ken Morrison's insight:

I like this series of major milestones in innovators' path of inspiration

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Facebook's Abbreviated Privacy Update, Even More Abbreviated

Facebook's Abbreviated Privacy Update, Even More Abbreviated | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Here's the important stuff.
Ken Morrison's insight:

This was helpful.

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What to Post & When to Post it on 9 Important Social Networks [Infographic]

What to Post & When to Post it on 9 Important Social Networks [Infographic] | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Posting to one or two social platforms for your business can be tricky. When you’re attempting to have a presence on nine or more, however, it becomes exceedingly difficult and time-consuming. How…

Via steve batchelder, juandoming
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Page posting tips for the holidays

Page posting tips for the holidays | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Facebook for Business gives you the latest news, tips, and best practices for using Facebook to help meet your business goals: www.facebook.com/business
Ken Morrison's insight:

Here are Facebook's seven tips for how to successfully promote your brand's page. Of course they want you to buy advertising.  Others are somewhat helpful for beginners. Either way, it is a good reminder for what they say will be successful.

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"Get a Room!" This will probably get creepy. Facebook launches Rooms for iOS, its first anonymous app

"Get a Room!"  This will probably get creepy.   Facebook launches Rooms for iOS, its first anonymous app | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Despite building its entire existence around real identities, social network giant Facebook today unveiled Rooms, its new anonymous app. The project was created by the Facebook Creative Labs team.

In the new app, users can create individual chatrooms around various topics they’d like to discuss, customize the color and design, invite others to join them via QR codes that can be shared, and hold anonymous discussions within the room. In a post on Rooms’ blog, Facebook’s product manager Josh Miller writes:

A room is a feed of photos, videos, and text – not too different from the one you have on Instagram or Facebook – with a topic determined by whoever created the room. Early users have already created rooms for everything from beat boxing videos to parkour to photos of home-cooked meals. There’s even a room called “Kicks From Above” that showcases photographs of cool shoes in cool places.
This isn’t the first time Facebook has dabbling in popular social app concepts pioneered by others. Facebook launched Poke back in December 2012 as a first shot at a Snapchat clone. After Poke went nowhere, it launched Slingshot in June this year.

Though it’s not hard to see how the popularity of apps like Secret and Whisper may have inspired Facebook to delve into anonymous sharing, Yik Yak is likely the biggest inspiration here. About a month ago, two weeks before the New York Times’ report on the upcoming anonymous app, Miller — who is also the cofounder of the Facebook-acquired Branch and the lead of Rooms — sent the following tweet:



Though Yik Yak is similar to Secret and Whisper in that it enables anonymous socializing, it also relies heavily on location as a means to group conversations thematically. For example, Yik Yak’s been launching on college campuses as a way to help students chat about the goings-on in their communities.

Along with Miller’s interest in Yik Yak, let’s not forget what Branch, his former startup, was all about: topical conversations in an invite-only online setting. It wasn’t anonymous (actually, the opposite), but Branch nevertheless was built around “chatrooms” revolving around a topic, just like Rooms.

Rooms is also an experiment that’s as anti-Facebook as it can get.

As mentioned, Facebook’s entire being has revolved around real identities, which arguably gave it an edge over other social networks like MySpace. However, this issue landed the company in hot water recently when it wouldn’t allow drag queens to use their stage names on Facebook, an issue that put alternative network Ello in the spotlight.

Along with the idea of connecting “real” people around the world, Facebook released Facebook Connect (now Facebook Login) in 2008, as a way to let its users easily login into other apps and websites, as well as enable those apps to pull various levels of information from users’ profiles. Entire businesses (Lyft, Tinder) were built around Facebook users’ real identities. In addition, people can comment on sites all over the Internet using their Facebook profiles.

But with Rooms, users can shield their names. They can anonymous chat and say whatever they want without it being tied to their identities and potential judgement from others. According to Miller:

One of the things our team loves most about the internet is its potential to let us be whoever we want to be. It doesn’t matter where you live, what you look like or how old you are – all of us are the same size and shape online. This can be liberating, but only if we have places that let us break away from the constraints of our everyday selves. We want the rooms you create to be freeing in this way. From unique obsessions and unconventional hobbies, to personal finance and health-related issues – you can celebrate the sides of yourself that you don’t always show to your friends.
Moreover, giving users free rein to customize the rooms they create (including colors, Like buttons, name, and so on) is a big deal. Unlike MySpace in the early 2000s, Facebook has created a one-size-fits-all design and has stuck to this approach.

But it’s not clear what the company will do with Rooms if it does take off: Monetizing it would be difficult, as plugging the app into Facebook would defeat the purpose of anonymity. But given Facebook’s lack of success with its previous experimental apps (Poke died and Slingshot is pretty forgotten now), it’ll be interesting to see if anonymity is the experiment that sticks for Facebook.

More information:

Facebook
Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 1.15 billion monthly active users. Facebook was founded by Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, initially as an exclusive network for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 w...
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The Best Features of Facebook Messenger You're Probably Not Using

The Best Features of Facebook Messenger You're Probably Not Using | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Facebook took a lot of flak for making its standalone Messenger app mandatory. Many feel (myself among them) that a standalone app for messages is unnecessary. Even so, that doesn't make it a bad app, or not useful in its own way. Here are some of the best features of Facebook Messenger that make it worth using.
Ken Morrison's insight:

I am trying to keep an open mind about this disruptive scale-down of Facebook.  I personal feeling is that if Facebook is the 2nd biggest app on my phone, there is no reason that it can't use some of the space that I allocate for it to include messages.

I actually made a website shortcut on my home screen of my iPhone so that I can bypass the app.  That is my short-term way of revolting. I basically don't like how Facebook is simply changing the gate structure and forcing the sheep to go to a new pen to get fed. 

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How Dan Rather Became the Only Good Newsman on Facebook

How Dan Rather Became the Only Good Newsman on Facebook | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
He’s been out of the anchor’s chair for over a decade and is about to turn 85. But Dan Rather’s blend of foreboding and hope is reaching more people than ever—on Facebook.
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What a ban on online porn can teach us about Internet law

What a ban on online porn can teach us about Internet law | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Regulators must now decide what to do with "filtered" Internet experiences.
Ken Morrison's insight:
This potential loophole will become interesting as Google and Facebook eventually try to give out free internet access in the US.
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How to Create Cinemagraph Video Profiles for Facebook

How to Create Cinemagraph Video Profiles for Facebook | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Learn to create a cinemagraphs for Facebook Video Profiles with Flixel Cinemagraph Pro for Mac and iOS.
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Inside Facebook's plan to build a better school

Looking back, Mike Sego says, he was always meant to work in education. His dad taught fifth grade for 37 years, three of his older siblings were K-12 teachers, and he spent free time as a kid...
Ken Morrison's insight:

Like Google and Apple, Facebook is looking to enter the education world.

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How to Create Social Media Images That Connect With Your Audience

How to Create Social Media Images That Connect With Your Audience | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Do your images stand out? This article shares seven ways to connect with your audience on a personal level using social media images.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Visual communications on social media will not disappear soon. Michael Stelzner helps your organization share visual images in a wise way.

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What Teens Really Think About YouTube, Google+, Reddit and Other Social Media

What Teens Really Think About YouTube, Google+, Reddit and Other Social Media - Backchannel - Medium
By the “Actual Teen” who nailed Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat last week
Ken Morrison's insight:

This post from a 19 year-old college students is getting traction in recent days as he talks about social media.  The most memorable statement for me is that he said that Instagram is a place to share the photo that sums up their favorite moments; Facebook is a place where they place photos so that their family knows that they are still alive.

 

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Manuel Pinto's curator insight, January 14, 2015 6:17 AM

 

Danah Boyd's comments:

https://medium.com/message/an-old-fogeys-analysis-of-a-teenagers-view-on-social-media-5be16981034d

An excerpt:

"I’m not bothered by these teens’ comments; I’m bothered by the way they are interpreted and treated by the tech press and the digerati.

I’m a researcher. I’ve been studying American teens’ engagement with social media for over a decade. I wrote a book on the topic. I don’t speak on behalf of teens, but I do amplify their voices and try to make sense of the diversity of experiences teens have. I work hard to account for the biases in whose voices I have access to because I’m painfully aware that it’s hard to generalize about a population that’s roughly 16 million people strong. They are very diverse and, yet, journalists and entrepreneurs want to label them under one category and describe them as one thing".

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Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Facebook And Twitter, Report Says

Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Facebook And Twitter, Report Says | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
"Stop making Facebook the center of your relationship marketing efforts," says Nate Elliott, VP and principal analyst at Forrester.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Three days before Facebook changes their formula for reaching small business subscribers, Forester drops this report:
"Stop making Facebook the center of your relationship marketing efforts," writes Nate Elliott, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester.

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Updating Our Terms and Policies: Helping You Understand How Facebook Works and How to Control Your Information

Updating Our Terms and Policies: Helping You Understand How Facebook Works and How to Control Your Information | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Over the past year, we’ve introduced new features and controls to help you get more out of Facebook, and listened to people who have asked us to better explain how we get and use information.
Ken Morrison's insight:

Thoughts?

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When is a company's Facebook post not an ad? - CNET

When is a company's Facebook post not an ad? - CNET | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Facebook has decided to exert more control over posts that it deems "overly promotional." Ultimately, though, isn't every Facebook post by a company promotional?
Ken Morrison's insight:

It is important for brand page managers to understand that Facebook is looking closely to determine if your brand posts are 'too" promotional.

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Facebook is Much Less Addictive When You Remove the Numbers | Big Think

Facebook is Much Less Addictive When You Remove the Numbers | Big Think | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
We all know Facebook is addicting. We whittle away time clicking and liking (and stalking). But how does the social network keep this hold on us?

Shirley Li from The Atlantic sat down with Ben Grosser, a programmer and artist, who believes you can find the answers by looking at the numbers:

"There were times when I was more focused on the numbers than the content itself. I was more interested in how many likes I had instead of who liked it. I realized every time I logged in I looked at those numbers. Why was I caring? Why do I care so much?"

He created a browser extension two years ago to test his hypothesis: The Facebook Demetricator. It hides the numbers. The eye-catching little red number pop-up showing your notifications is replaced by a lighter blue icon. It even hides how many people Like your post—instead you see the general phrase "people like this.” The add-on disarms the site of metrics for you to pour over.

Advertising

The extension has been downloaded over 5,000 times, and with it has come feedback and reactions relating to how the tool has changed Facebook for them. Grosser received personal observations of how the site has changed (both positive and negative), and he converted this information into a paper that was published recently in the journal Computational Culture.

There's a numbers game integrated into Facebook that plays on users emotions, cultivating a culture that values self-worth in quantitative terms. You want to have more numbers on your posts, more notifications, more friends—think of the way the “+1 Add Friend” button feels versus the Facebook Demetricator's “Add Friend” button. The language and attention given to metrics makes it become almost like a currency for a game—the more you have, the higher your level. But when Grosser gave users the ability to take away the numbers they'd been pining after, something interesting happened:

"People realized when the numbers were gone, they had been using them to decide whether to like something. I certainly didn't expect these tendencies of people saying, 'I literally don't know what to do [without knowing the metrics].'"

"I think it's a problem when we don't know what those likes mean, when we start focusing on wanting more likes. If we aren't aware of how these numbers are telling us to interact, then it's a problem."

Read more at The Atlantic

Photo Credit: 2nix Studi/ Shutterstock

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Social Media Over The Past Decade | HubSpot

Social Media Over The Past Decade | HubSpot | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

...To think of what “might be” a few years from now is barely fathomable but really exciting! I remember listening to the keynote speaker at the 1990 Seybold Conference talk about how books in the future would be enjoyed on electronic readers, and thinking, “not in my lifetime would electronic readers replace printed books.” We all know how that turned out.


Let’s go back and hit the high points from the past ten years. Below is a visual infographic timeline followed by a more detailed look at each year! Pay close attention to the ones that were launched in 2012; some of them have a lot of potential to be game changers!


Via Jeff Domansky
Ken Morrison's insight:
When did you jump in?
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 16, 2014 9:07 PM

Great way to look at the history of social media.

Amanda Swanson's curator insight, August 22, 2014 8:22 AM

# 19 - A quick look at social media development over the last ten years.

 

Angie Thao's curator insight, May 13, 2016 10:58 AM

Timeline Infograph:

Like: It's to the point, uses good visual.

Dislike: Maybe some information??