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An Eye on New Media
New Media in Society, Business & Classrooms
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Don't Call It A Mind-Meld: Human Brains Connect Via Internet : NPR

Don't Call It A Mind-Meld: Human Brains Connect Via Internet : NPR | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
In what they call "direct brain-to-brain communication in humans," researchers at the University of Washington say they've successfully passed signals from one mind to another via the Internet, without using surgical implants.
Ken Morrison's insight:

"The Internet was a way to connect computers, and now it can be a way to connect brains," researcher Andrea Stocco says, in a release from the University of Washington. "We want to take the knowledge of a brain and transmit it directly from brain to brain."

 
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No I don't have two hours! A two hour conversation between Curt Bonk and Jay Cross.

No I don't have two hours!  A two hour conversation between Curt Bonk and Jay Cross. | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

I hope you like this.  You may also like many shorter nuggets of his golden ideas.

 

Ken Morrison's insight:

Do you have two hours?  No, I didn't think so.  But you should bookmark this link.  It is a GREAT conversation between Curt Bonk and Jay Cross about the things that help people learn (etiher in universities or the work place).  It is worth watching or at least having on in the background.  Great stuff!!!!!

 

Ken's Key Takeaway

I didn't care much about the 70-20-10 rule in the past. I agree know after the way that he explained it.

70% of what we learn is experimental

20% of what we learn is through other people or our mentors

10% of what we learn is formal learning

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Ken Morrison's comment, April 17, 2013 9:31 AM
Hi Lucinda. Thanks for the rescoop.
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Building Social and Emotional Skills in Elementary Students: Passion and Strengths

Building Social and Emotional Skills in Elementary Students: Passion and Strengths | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
In this nine-part series, we will look at important factors that influence the happiness and social and emotional learning of elementary school age children. These are very useful in helping students
Ken Morrison's insight:

Ken's Key Take-away:

Make sure your students are fully aware at what their skills are.  Some don't know.  Also, try to help them find activities that makee time go quickly for them.  When students are in 'the flow' their brains work best and remember more.

 

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Barbara Kurts's comment, January 9, 2013 9:04 PM
my topics here http://www.scoop.it/t/health-leads-plus
ben bernard's comment, January 9, 2013 11:37 PM
thanks ! http://www.scoop.it/t/direct-marketing-services my newly made scoop.it :)
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How The Brain Rewires Itself

How The Brain Rewires Itself | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

KEN'S KEY TAKEAWAY:

This is an older article, but a great primer on neuroplasticity.  I like the story about the piano player.

Ken

 

 


"FOR DECADES, THE PREVAILING DOGMA IN neuroscience was that the adult human brain is essentially immutable, hardwired, fixed in form and function, so that by the time we reach adulthood we are pretty much stuck with what we have. Yes, it can create (and lose) synapses, the connections between neurons that encode memories and learning. And it can suffer injury and degeneration. But this view held that if genes and development dictate that one cluster of neurons will process signals from the eye and another cluster will move the fingers of the right hand, then they'll do that and nothing else until the day you die. There was good reason for lavishly illustrated brain books to show the function, size and location of the brain's structures in permanent ink.ut research in the past few years has overthrown the dogma. In its place has come the realization that the adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience."


Via Maggie Rouman, AnnasCause, Carolyn D Cowen, Linda Alexander
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Kamakshi Rajagopal's comment, April 12, 2013 5:53 AM
Hi Maggie, we are conducting an experiment on Scoop.IT pages on education at the Open Universiteit (NL). Would you like to participate? Sign up here: bit.ly/14QR9oa
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Left Brain Vs. Right Brain Teaching Techniques | Funderstanding

Left Brain Vs. Right Brain Teaching Techniques | Funderstanding | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
The human brain is separated into two distinct hemispheres connected by a corpus callosum, or a bundle of nerve fibers that facilitates communication between...
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Ken Morrison's comment, August 31, 2012 6:42 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. I like the practical suggestions at the end of this article. Of course we do many of these as teachers, but it is interesting to see why each type of thinker appreciates it.
Ken
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Brain Rules - Multimedia introduction| lots of great content!

Brain Rules - Multimedia introduction| lots of great content! | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

This highly multi-media 'preview' of John Medina's book, Brain Rules gives lots of helpful content!

Ken

 

Brain Rules by John J. Medina is a multimedia project explaining how the brain works. It includes a book, a feature-length documentary film, and a series of interactive tutorials.

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The Neuroscience of Effort

The Neuroscience of Effort | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Thank you to my student Daniel for sharing this important article from Wired magazine about how motivation and attention effect our brain....or vice versa


Via Daniel Kim
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Daniel Kim's comment, May 21, 2012 2:08 AM
Thank you for rescooping this article Professor.
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Are you a (self-imposed) victim of the "Twitch"

Seth Godin discusses the trend of the past year in which we are all rewarding ourselves by constantly changing focus.  He questions the long-term benefit of this increasingly-nimble pattern of thinking.

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The Future Belongs to the Curious

The Future Belongs to the Curious | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Intellectual growth commences at birth and cease only at death. Sometimes questions are more important than answers. The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.
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Steve Jobs on Memory & Imagination

Memory & Imagination: New Pathways to the Library of Congress. Steve Jobs


Via JackieGerstein Ed.D., ABroaderView
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Game addicts display similar brain structure to that of drug addicts

Game addicts display similar brain structure to that of drug addicts | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

154 students from different countries were studied to determine how the brain of game addicts compares to the brain of a durg addict

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Mariusz Leś's comment, November 20, 2011 7:48 AM
I hope they won't get me, I'm on the 3rd level now.
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Wake Up Brain!

Parts of this are a bit cheezy, but it does help me to remember the quality points http://www.ethos3.com/2010/01/5-presentation-brainstorming-warm-ups/...

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Dan Pink: What Motivates Us | Let Go & Lead

Dan Pink: What Motivates Us | Let Go & Lead | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
What Motivates Us Dan Pink Best-Selling Author and Speechwriter Dan has a peculiar fascination with work.
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Samsung Tests a Galaxy Note 10.1 Controlled by Brain Activity | MIT Technology Review

Samsung Tests a Galaxy Note 10.1 Controlled by Brain Activity  | MIT Technology Review | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

One day, we may be able to check e-mail or call a friend without ever touching a screen or even speaking to a disembodied helper. Samsung is researching how to bring mind control to its mobile devices with the hope of developing ways for people with mobility impairments to connect to the world. The ultimate goal of the project, say researchers in the company’s Emerging Technology Lab, is to broaden the ways in which all people can interact with devices.

 

In collaboration with Roozbeh Jafari, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of Texas, Dallas, Samsung researchers are testing how people can use their thoughts to launch an application, select a contact, select a song from a playlist, or power up or down a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. While Samsung has no immediate plans to offer a brain-controlled phone, the early-stage research, which involves a cap studded with EEG-monitoring electrodes, shows how a brain-computer interface could help people with mobility issues complete tasks that would otherwise be impossible.

 

Brain-computer interfaces that monitor brainwaves through EEG have already made their way to the market. NeuroSky’s headset uses EEG readings as well as electromyography to pick up signals about a person’s level of concentration to control toys and games (see “Next-Generation Toys Read Brain Waves, May Help Kids Focus”). Emotiv Systems sells a headset that reads EEG and facial expression to enhance the experience of gaming (see “Mind-Reading Game Controller”).

 

Тo use EEG-detected brain signals to control a smartphone, the Samsung and UT Dallas researchers monitored well-known brain activity patterns that occur when people are shown repetitive visual patterns. In their demonstration, the researchers found that people could launch an application and make selections within it by concentrating on an icon that was blinking at a distinctive frequency.

 

Why It Matters

 

A brain-controlled mobile device could give paralyzed people more ways to interact with the world while also improving functionality for all of us.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ken Morrison's insight:

This interests me. Yet, I am not going to want to make a two-year $2,000 commitment on a cell phone.  I like the innovation.  I don't know if the demand is there to justify it deep deep research that will be needed to make it practical.  With that said...WELL DONE SAMSUNG!

 

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Min Kim's comment, April 26, 2013 6:01 PM
It really is interesting. I do agree with you for the fact that this technology doesn't seem practical but who knows this will our next shift in new media technology? hahaha
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Does Thinking Change The Shape Of Your Brain?

Does Thinking Change The Shape Of Your Brain? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Here's a puzzler for you. Does thinking change the shape of your brain? For example, does contemplating this question actually physically change your brain?

Via Evdokia Roka
Ken Morrison's insight:

A nice video about the power of visualization in learning

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A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories - Infographic

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories - Infographic | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Do you know the actual theories of learning? A learning theory is an attempt to describe how people learn, helping us understand this inherently complex process.

Via Kirrina
Ken Morrison's insight:

A nice infographic showing behaviorism, cognitivism, connectivism and constructivism.  It also inclused subcategories and how they apply to cooperation.

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15 Big Ways The Internet Is Changing Our Brain » Online College Search - Your Accredited Online Degree Directory

15 Big Ways The Internet Is Changing Our Brain » Online College Search - Your Accredited Online Degree Directory | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Ken's Key Takeaway.  in the circa 15 years that the internet has been in wide use, it has changed our brains in 15 ways.  

 

Taken From article:

-The Internet is our external hard drive
-Children are learning differently
-We hardly ever give tasks our full attention
-We don’t bother to remember
-We’re getting better at finding information
-Difficult questions make us think about computers
-IQ is increasing over time
-Our concentration is suffering
-We’re getting better at determining relevance
-We’re becoming physically addicted to technology
-The more you use the Internet, the more it lights up your brain
-Our brains constantly seek out incoming information
-We’ve become power browsers

-Online thinking persists even offline
-Creative thinking may suffer

 

Article with Ken's highlights

http://diigo.com/0slzw

 

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Growing up Gen Y: The Impact of Being Immersed in Technology

Growing up Gen Y: The Impact of Being Immersed in Technology | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Ken's Key take-away:

At least two credible studies contradict these claims and indicate the unsophisticated information-searching techniques used by Gen Y (i.e., lack of ability to critically evaluate the information they retrieved).

 

 

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Brain Rules for Presenters

Ken's Key Takeaways:

-Exercise boosts brain power

-We don't pay attention to boring things

-Vision trumps all other senses

 

I keep hearing great things about Dr. John Medina.  When I saw this presentations presented by Garr Reynolds, I had to share!

 

 

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The Internet's Battle For Our Digital Souls | Endless Innovation | Big Think

The Internet's Battle For Our Digital Souls | Endless Innovation | Big Think | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

Harvard neuroscience researchers have just confirmed what many of us have suspected all along: social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest are “brain candy” for Internet users. Every status update, every tweet, every pin is a micro-jolt delivered squarely to the pleasure centers of our brains. We get approximately the same type of pleasure from talking about ourselves on social media as we do from having sex.

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The Neuroscience of Your Brain On Fiction

Stories stimulate the brain. Metaphors like “He had leathery hands” rouse the sensory cortex.  Intersting study on what happens in our brain when exposed to different adjectives, etc. when reading.

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Scientists Model Brain to Teach Computers to Recognize

Scientists Model Brain to Teach Computers to Recognize | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it
Researchers at the beginning of the computer revolution assumed that teaching a computer to recognize something would be easy. But half a century on computer vision is still a primitive thing.
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Overload Stories » Guest column: Memory in the Age of the Internet – The More Things Change, The More They Remain The Same?

Overload Stories » Guest column: Memory in the Age of the Internet – The More Things Change, The More They Remain The Same? | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

I am reading "The Shallows" about how the internet is chaning our brains so this is very interesting to me. 

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Six Tips for Brain-Based Learning | Edutopia

Empowering and connecting teachers, administrators, and parents with innovative solutions and resources to better education. Join the conversation today!
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GigaOM RoadMap 2011: live video coverage

GigaOM RoadMap 2011: live video coverage | An Eye on New Media | Scoop.it

The first-ever GigaOM RoadMap event... examining how constant connectivity will change the way we work, live, create and consume.
-Video talks included! - 

 

 

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