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Animated classical paintings make me want to escape into other worlds

I really love these 2.5D animations of classical paintings by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro. He says that they are "a tribute to the art and her disarming beauty." Some are more inviting and evocative than the actual painting.
Monika Fleischmann's insight:

Rather than simple animations, Rino used layered animation to further immerse the viewer into landscapes, religious and mythological scenes.

Here's how this is done, as described in a previous article:

They processed each still photo in Photoshop, separating different elements on their own layers—parts of the background, elements of the figures, etc. Then they imported these still layers to After Effects, where they animated them in layers, moving them at sightly different speeds to achieve a parallax effect—since objects closer to the viewer appear to move faster than objects faraway, this makes your brain think the camera is moving in 3D space. It's the same parallax effect they used in old video games, when true 3D was still not available.

Then they applied some subtle deformation to some elements of the image (like the wings of that owl) to give the illusion of actual movement. Add some clever editing and boom, you think you are watching actual video captures.

The technique is getting more and more popular and, when it's not exaggerated like in some of the artwork in this video, I can't have enough of it.

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media art and digital media education at the intersection of transdisciplinary teaching and learning practices
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Curation for Education: The Curator as a Facilitator

Curation for Education: The Curator as a Facilitator | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, June 7, 2013 6:44 PM

An expert always provides feedback on the next steps....

 

A facilitator... facilitates the student to learn from peer feedback and self reflection

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 7, 2013 7:38 PM

We know we have lots of self-appointed experts. They masquerade as facilitators as well.

Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, June 13, 2013 11:44 AM

focus on chart. The other ideas are the ones we've been dealing with for...ten years?

Nire iritziz taula da  interesgarriena. Gainerako ideiek +10 urte? dauzkate.

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art & science: Ars Electronica + ESO starten internationale Initiative

art & science: Ars Electronica + ESO starten internationale Initiative | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
European Digital Art and Science Network
Monika Fleischmann's insight:

Gemeinsam mit sieben Kunst- und Kultureinrichtungen und der ESO (European Southern Observatory) startet Ars Electronica eine internationale Initiative: Das European Digital Art and Science Network wird KünstlerInnen ab sofort die Chance auf einen Aufenthalt bei der ESO und am Ars Electronica Futurelab eröffnen.

Das „European Digital Art and Science Network” will wissenschaftliche Aspekte und Ideen mit den Ansätzen der digitalen Kunst verknüpfen. Interdisziplinarität, interkultureller Austausch und die Erschließung neuer Zielgruppen zählen dabei zu den erklärten Zielen. Ebenfalls im Fokus steht die Rolle der Kunst als Katalysator für gesellschaftliche Neuerungsprozesse: Indem sie Bilder und Geschichten rund um die Chancen und Risiken technologischer bzw. wissenschaftlicher Entwicklungen schaffen, haben KünstlerInnen maßgeblichen Anteil daran, auf welche Weise unsere Gesellschaft mit diesen Innovationen umgeht.

 

 

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artpeople

artpeople | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
We share a vision; to create, innovate and explore the world. ArtPeople gallery brings you the best new artists, undiscovered masters and fresh talents.
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Download: Acht umfangreiche Whitepaper zum Thema Facebook Marketing

Download: Acht umfangreiche Whitepaper zum Thema Facebook Marketing | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
Einmal gepostet und schon fast wieder vergessen. Viele unserer Beiträge erhalten allerdings auch noch Monate nach ihrer Veröffentlichung viel Aufmerksamkeit. Ganz oft sind dies umfangreiche Whitepaper, die wir euch kostenlos zum Download anbieten. Wir haben für euch acht schöne Beispiele in einer Liste gesammelt. Insgesamt 177 Seiten geballtes Wissen, das ihr euch hier downloaden könnt. Viel Spaß! 1. Warum eine Social-Media-Strategie so wichtig ist Der zentrale Ausgangspunkt für eine erfolgreich
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List of Physical Visualizations

List of Physical Visualizations | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
Monika Fleischmann's insight:
List of Physical Visualizationsand Related ArtifactsThis page is a chronological list of physical visualizations and related artifacts, curated by Pierre Dragicevic and Yvonne Jansen. Thanks to Fanny Chevalier and our other contributors. If you know of another interesting physical visualization, please submit one! Or post a general comment.This list currently has 105 entries. Recent additions:Charles Csuri’s Numeric Milling SculptureWarning: Real Time Global Air Quality DisplaySynaptic Caguamas: Visualize Cellular AutomataSee more...
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Prof. Monika Fleischmann « SchulKinoWochen Berlin | 14.−28.11.2014

Prof. Monika Fleischmann « SchulKinoWochen Berlin | 14.−28.11.2014 | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
Offizielle Website der SchulKinoWochen Berlin 2011 - 14
Monika Fleischmann's insight:

Forscherin zum Wissenschaftsjahr: Die digitale Gesellschaft

zu Her zu Gast im Kino am Montag, den 17.11. um 10:00 im UCI Kinowelt Friedrichshain

Monika Fleischmanns Arbeiten liegen im Spannungsfeld zwischen Wissenschaft (Computer Science) und Kunst (interaktive Medienkunst). In theoretischen und praktischen Arbeiten untersucht sie Computertechnologien auf ihr Kreatives Potential und inszeniert Experimente zur Untersuchung der Schnittstelle zwischen maschineller Funktion und menschlicher Phantasie. 1997 gründete und leitet sie das MARS Exploratory Media Lab am (späteren) Fraunhofer Institut für Medienkommunikation und ab 2004 auch die eCulture Factory.

 

 

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Things I wish I knew when I started my PhD…

Things I wish I knew when I started my PhD… | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
As the academic year begins again, new PhD students across the country (and further) are slowly settling into their fresh surroundings. I stayed at the same university when I made the switch to pos...
Monika Fleischmann's insight:

1. Learn Latex.

This beautiful typesetting program may seem scary at first but it will help you create very organised and professional looking documents. It also sorts the layout for you, thus avoiding that awkward problem in MS Word when you need to insert a figure into the beginning of a document that you’ve already spent hours getting right (we’ve all been there!). It is also really well documented online, with hundreds of help pages and forums, not to mention templates of ready-made documents. Even PhD thesis templates (e.g. from Charly here).

2. Use Bibtex.

Avoid needlessly hand typing out hundreds of references! Linked to (1), Bibtexis an additional package that automatically outputs and typesets your reference lists, depending on the citations you call in your document. You’ll need a Bibtex file, but that’s easy with (3).

3. Keep your papers organised.

Using some software to keep all the pdf’s of journal articles and papers you’ve read in order is essential. Bibdesk is useful and comes with most Latex/Bibtex installations. Others include Mendeley, which is free and can sync across multiple computers (this is what I use), and Papers, which has a small initial cost. All three can produce the bibtex file you need to automatically create reference lists in (2).

4. Keep a formatted list of your own publications and conference abstracts as you go along.

It will make things much easier when you need to provide these sorts of things if you start applying for postdocs.

5. Always give conference abstracts different titles.

Even if you’re presenting the exact same research, make sure you give it a new title – it will look much better in the long run, especially on your list of publications/abstracts in (4).

6. Keep on top of your emails.

This is two fold. Firstly, organise your inbox with folders so you can easily find emails months after they were received. Secondly, if emails need a response get them out of the way early. Continually putting this off may result in you forgetting entirely and missed opportunities. Personally I try to get all my emails in order each morning when I first get to the office.

Poor email and time management can cause unwanted issues… Image credit: phdcomics.com

7. Manage time.

Time management is key when trying to balance your research with teaching/demonstrating duties, a personal life and anything else you get up to. A routine may help with this, see (27).

8. Hypothesis testing.

At least from the science background I know, hypothesis testing is key to a successful research project. Related to your overall science aims, think about what you would like to test and keep this is mind so you stay focused on your original goals. Having a hypothesis to test ensures you have an overall scientific aim, which is especially useful if someone new you meet asks you what your research is about.

9. Keep detailed notes.

Of everything. All the time. Whether this is a lab book, a diary, or a note book with model edits and useful computing commands, write everything down. Keeping it chronological with dated entries is also very useful. This is one of the biggest mistakes I made when I first started. Keeping notes in this way will make it much easier for you to revisit old research and remember what you were thinking at the time. It will also make getting back into your research after a holiday, conference, or workshop etc., much simpler. Even after a weekend, it will allow you to pick up where you left off before you stopped early and went for that end-of-week drink.

10. Avoid perfectionism.

When you’re making that final figure, or drafting a paper manuscript or conference abstract, don’t spend ages making small incremental changes in search of the perfect final piece. Chances are it will change. And then change again. If you’re preparing a piece of work that will be commented on by your supervisor or other co-authors, your best bet is to just get it to an acceptable standard and send it off for those comments asap. The sooner you get it away and then back, the quicker you can see what your ‘superiors’ think of it and incorporate their comments before firing them back the second draft. This short, sharp iterative procedure often works out quicker in the long run.

11. Always give deadlines when you want feedback.

If you’re sending your supervisor or co-authors a document for comments always specify a deadline. This may seem scary at first, but take a note from outside academia – nothing in industry goes anywhere without a deadline. E.g. if you’re drafting a manuscript for a paper, tell them you will submit it in 2 weeks so they have until then to get their comments to you.

12. Source additional funding.

Chances are you will see various emails come and go mentioning possibilities for additional funding to attend conferences or fieldwork, for example. As funding for science is getting cut, this sort of extra money becomes even more important. Once you learn of something that may be useful now or in the future, keep it written down in a list somewhere. Then, when the time comes, you can revisit the list and start applying for the money you will (almost definitely) need. Talking to other PhD students and postdocs in your group is also useful for this to see what sorts of things they might have applied for in the past.

13. Write as you go.

This is pretty self-explanatory, but writing as you work your way through your PhD years will make the thesis much less of a monster when you come to the end. Writing up papers to adapt into thesis chapters is a useful way to go about this, with the added benefit of getting your name into the scientific community of your chosen specialisation.

14. Don’t be scared of your supervisors.

They are there to help you after all.

15. Log out of Facebook.

Yep, it’s sad but true. Facebook (and other social media for that matter) has become an integral part of society, but with all the buzzfeed quizzes, videos of kittens and “I fucking love science”, it can (obviously) be a massive distraction. Log out while you’re actually working and try to restrict yourself to only checking while you’re having short study breaks or lunch.

The perils of Facebook in the office… Image credit: phdcomics.com

16. Keep an eye on your budget.

This links back to (12). If your PhD funding comes with a certain amount for research costs, conference travel, and fieldwork etc., make sure you know how much you’re spending and how much you have left.

17. Diversify yourself.

One of the beauties of doing a PhD is the numerous opportunities that will become available to you during your studies. You should indulge – go to as many additional courses and workshops as you can. This is a great way to improve things like science communication, outreach, presenting, and scientific writing, amongst other subject specific skills.

18. Music.

If listening to music while you work is your thing, you’re going to want to get yourself some decent noise cancelling head/ear phones to drown out all other unwanted office distractions. This also works the other way, and stops your office mates from having to hear your music. You may like the Spice Girls, but they might not…

19. Get your workstation set up.

This has a variety of levels. First and foremost is your desk and chair combo. Ensure this is as ergonomic as possible to prevent discomfort down the line – you could be sitting here for 40+ hours a week for 3+ years. Next is your computer. Hopefully your supervisor will provide you with one, but you may need to lean on other members from your research group for assistance to set up the internet, printing and any software/hardware you need for your specific research. Plenty of help is also available online. For those of you who use a Mac, a lecturer in our department has put together a page called ‘Mac Eye For The Geophysics Guy’ which has lots of useful tips for configuring a Mac for scientific research. It has a slight geophysics and Bristol University slant, but a lot of it will be useful for others too. Last is working out where you will get your hydration from. Source out the kettle/water dispenser/coffee shop of choice and work out if there are any common times when people break for a caffeine fix. Hydration is key to a clear and alert mind, while taking breaks with your colleagues will ensure you don’t get too locked up in your own research and go for hours without talking to anyone but the computer screen…!

20. Take notes in meetings.

This is linked back to (9), but making sure you write everything down, even when you might be in an important meeting with fast-paced discussion, is essential if you want to remember what was said and decided upon a few weeks later. If it doesn’t seem important at the time, it may well prove to be extremely useful in the future.

Being well read on your PhD topic, as well as the wider field, is key to a successful PhD.

21. Read around your subject.

This is important to ensure you know where your own PhD fits within the bigger picture, and the overall aims of your field of research.

22. Write a literature review.

I didn’t do this when I started my PhD but I wish I had. After reading up on your subject, and then around your subject, you will hopefully have a good idea of the current state of research. Now is the time to formulate your own research ideas, and hypotheses to test, and get this all written into a concise literature review. Chances are it will eventually form the basis of your PhD thesis introduction chapter.

23. Socialise!

When deadlines are tight and things aren’t going well it can be easy to retreat into your own little research cave. But try to avoid this where possible (sometimes it might be impossible). Keeping contact with friends or meeting work colleague outside of the lab is good for morale and to help you forget about the troubles you may have been facing during the working day.

24. Sport and/or hobbies.

Engaging in some exercise a few times a week will work wonders to reduce your stress levels as well as keep you healthy and in good shape. Likewise, starting or continuing a hobby will also help you to relax after a long day or week (baking seems popular in our department and has the added benefit of making others happy too).

25. Go to conferences and workshops.

There are multiple benefits here. Conferences allow you to present your work to people, as well as learn about the most up-and-coming advances in your field. Workshops are excellent opportunities to learn new skills, often from the people that first pioneered them. Both, however, should be used to network.

26. Network.

Building up a network of researchers and industry contacts in your field can prove invaluable down the line. It may open up new study visits and exchanges during your PhD, or it can help you to secure a postdoc or job upon finishing your PhD. Don’t be shy about approaching an established professor at a conference – chances are they will be just as excited to learn about what you’re doing as you are to speak to them. Business cards can be useful here, though they are not super common in academia.

27. Establish a routine.

This doesn’t work for everyone, but some people like to set up a routine to allow them to manage their time more effectively. This may include things like exercising on certain days at certain times, set days for grocery shopping or batch cooking, and fixed working hours, amongst many other possibilities.

Take the lead of your own PhD!

28. Take the lead.

Always remember it is YOUR project and YOUR paper and YOUR thesis. Even if you chose a predefined PhD project, it is up to you to decide how it progresses and which research leads you follow up. These are your steps to proving yourself as an independent researcher, so do just that!

29. Practice presenting your work.

Conference talks make everyone nervous, but there is no better way to prepare than by practicing. This could start off by you talking to an empty room, before taking on your research group and then maybe a departmental seminar of some sort. The more you practice, the more natural it will feel when you’re stood up the front – eventually the research will be rolling off your tongue with ease.

30. Be prepared for the worse.

One of life’s great mottos is “hope for the best and prepare for the worst”. A PhD is no different. You should be expecting things to go wrong at some point. It might not, but chances are something will not go to plan at some point. This can be particularly true if your project involves a lot of lab work. But rest assured, if this does happen it’s not the end of the world, and there are usually people around for support and help. Search them out.

31. Back up, and back up again.

Hard drives are notoriously unreliable. Coffee easily spills. Laptops are easily stolen. Not what you wanted to hear I would imagine, but these things can easily result in the loss of a lot of work. Prevent this from happening by constantly backing up your work. Back it up to different places (the cloud, external hard drives) and keep the back ups in different places to each other and the originals.

32. Small steps to success.

Don’t focus too much on long term goals (publishing papers, finishing the thesis); remember to walk before you run as it were. Aim for small progressive steps that lead to the bigger goals – finishing a set of analyses, producing some summary figures etc. It’s all good for morale.

33. Keep on top of admin.

Yes, it’s boring and can be time-consuming but it needs to be done, especially if it includes making sure you get paid for teaching or demonstrating. Getting stuff like this out of the way can easily be done while you wait for an analysis to run or a simulation to finish for example.

34. ENJOY IT!

The most important thing of all :).

Smile and enjoy it!

 
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11 Net Artists You Should Know

11 Net Artists You Should Know | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it

"Internet art" has been around as long as long as the Internet itself. A renegade thing, it's always on the edge of new technology, with its medium functioning as its own platform. 

Monika Fleischmann's insight:

GIFs, CAPTCHA codes, found imagery, experimental social networks — the manifestations and run-off of our daily online experience is all ripe fodder for the net artist. There has been some exciting new work floating around lately, so instead of taking you back to some ’80s cave drawing era of net art, we’ll introduce you to a few fun recent net artists, ranging from the tongue-in-cheek early Internet throwbacks to the user-friendly art “tools” anyone can enjoy. Disclaimer: If you think art is pretty paintings of pretty things, this little primer isn’t for you. In any case, we welcome your constructive snark! Proceed.

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Found object - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Found object - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

However, as an art form, found objects tend to include the artist's output-at the very least an idea about it, i.e. the artist's designation of the object as art-which is nearly always reinforced with a title. There is usually some degree of modification of the found object, although not always to the extent that it cannot be recognized, as is the case with ready-mades.

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Drone Shows Thousands Filling Hong Kong Streets - YouTube

Drone Shows Thousands Filling Hong Kong Streets - YouTube | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it

Epic is a word that gets thrown around way too often, but in the case of Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests it is justified. Yesterday, Facebook user "Nero Chan" captured on camera 100,000 people standing up against China for their right to a representative government. His edited footage on Facebook already has over 800,000 views, and a longer, music-free version on Youtube has more than 225,000 views.

http://reason.com/blog/2014/10/01/have-you-seen-the-drone-footage-of-hong


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This Clock Made of Clocks is the Coolest Clock You’ll See Today [Video]

This Clock Made of Clocks is the Coolest Clock You’ll See Today [Video] | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it

This wall clock is on display at the Ham Yard hotel in London and is made of 135 individual clocks all synchronized to display tim

Monika Fleischmann's insight:
 ----------------

 

This wall clock is on display at the Ham Yard hotel in London and is made of 135 individual clocks all synchronized to display time as well as various geometric shapes. Beautiful, isn’t it?

 


Read more at http://www.geeksaresexy.net/2014/09/24/this-clock-made-of-clocks-is-the-coolest-clock-youll-see-today-video/#PWXmDE5FT9S4q2Kk.99

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Robotic Spider Dress [Intel Edison based] // 2015 teaser on Vimeo

Aptly called the 'Spider Dress', this piece of wearable tech features animatronic mechanical limbs that respond to external stimuli while defend the personal space…
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MoMA | Designing Life: Synthetic Biology and Design

MoMA | Designing Life: Synthetic Biology and Design | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
MoMA | Designing Life: Synthetic Biology and Design

Via Socrates Logos
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Luciana de Paula's curator insight, December 20, 2:19 PM

O que acontece quando a biologia e mais especificamente , os materiais nucleicos e os processos que sustentam o ciclo de vida de todos os seres vivos desde o nascimento , à existência , à doença e à morte torna-se sinteticamente replicáveis por seres humanos e consequentemente se tornam projetos de design ? Na sequência da recente publicação MIT Estética sintética e apenas alguns dias antes do  iGEM (International Máquinas Geneticamente Modificadas ) Biologia Sintética 2014 Jamboree no início de Novembro de 2014, o Moma se propôs a discutir esta complexa questão, hospedando um painel de discussão, Estética sintéticas: Novas Fronteiras da Contemporary Design.

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Living Archives | Exploring archives and archiving practices in public and private spheres

Living Archives | Exploring archives and archiving practices in public and private spheres | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
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Karl Sims: Artifical Evolution for Computer Graphics

Monika Fleischmann's insight:

.. it was great when Karl presented his paper and work at Siggraph 92 and before at Ars Electronica.

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▶ How to apply for a degree programme in Germany - YouTube

There are different ways to apply for admission to a German university. The application procedure depends on which subject you would like to study and where ...
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Her « SchulKinoWochen Berlin | 14.−28.11.2014

Her « SchulKinoWochen Berlin | 14.−28.11.2014 | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
Offizielle Website der SchulKinoWochen Berlin 2011 - 14
Monika Fleischmann's insight:
HerAb Klasse: 10Der Film: Spike Jonze hat mit "Her" eine erstaunlich vorstellbare Zukunftsvision geschaffen, die nicht nur mit der außergewöhnlichen Liebe zu einem Betriebssystem verblüfft und überzeugt.Fächer: Sozialkunde, Ethik, Englisch, Deutsch, Informatik, Kunst, Philosophie, ReligionThemen: Künstliche Intelligenz und Robotik: Beziehungen zwischen Mensch und Maschine, Chancen und Risiken; Internet der Dinge: „intelligente“ Alltagsgegenstände, Gesellschaft, Identität, Kommunikation, Liebe, soziale Medien, Technik/neue Technologien, TrennungLinks: Filmtipp, Begleitmaterial zum Wissenschaftjahr zu Her

 

Im Rahmen des Wissenschaftsjahr 2014: Die digitale Gesellschaft

Spielfilm, USA 2013, Regie: Spike Jonze, 126 min

„Das Herz ist ein einsamer Rechner“ (FAZ)

Los Angeles in naher Zukunft: Vor dem Hintergrund einer blass wirkenden Stadt gehen die Menschen einem durch und durch digitalisierten Alltag nach. Anstelle von Handys und Smartphones tragen sie sprachgesteuerte Ohrstöpsel bei sich. Unter ihnen lebt der einfühlsame und introvertier te Theodore Twombly, dessen Leben durcheinander gerät, als er ein personalisiertes Betriebssystem auf seinem Computer installiert: Saman tha liest ihm nicht nur seine Emails vor, sie hört ihm auch zu, versteht ihn, ist witzig und attraktiv. Dass sie keinen Körper hat, scheint für Theodore dabei nicht von Bedeutung. Zumindest bis Samantha ihm erklärt, dass sie gleichzeitig mit 8316 anderen Personen spricht und zu 641 von ihnen eine Liebesbeziehung pflegt. Bemerkenswert ist auch die realistische
Darstellung dieser eindrücklichen Zukunftswelt: Sie drängt Fragen auf und stößt Reflexionsprozesse an, die neben gegenwärtigen und künftigen Kommunikationsformen auch Fragen nach dem (Zwischen-) Menschlichen thematisieren

 
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Symphonie Cinétique - The Poetry of Motion (Joachim Sauter & Ólafur Arnalds) by Matthias Maercks #mediaart #lightart

We are honored to present the project film of Symphonie Cinétique - The Poetry of Motion.

This film presents the wonderful journey that media artist Joachim Sauter (ART+COM) and composer Ólafur Arnalds ventured on together at MADE, that culminated with the creation and performance of this interdisciplinary Gesamtkunstwerk.

The dialogue and exchange between these two craftsmen, each coming from a distinctly different discipline, resulted in a majestic clash of light, motion and sound.

Please dive in, let go and enjoy this wonderful moment - Joachim's graceful kinetic pieces breathing and moving in harmony with the touching music composed by Olafur.

Film by: Matthias Maercks

About MADE

MADE is a creative platform for artists from various fields, located in the heart of Berlin.

It can be a gallery, a workspace, a studio, a stage, a laboratory, or a performance space – but most of all, it is a venue for interdisciplinary projects that invites artists to step out of their artistic routines.

The goal of MADE is to enable a new kind of creative work by bringing together different artistic fields and offering a workspace and an inspiring biotope that allows new things to happen.

MADE was founded in early 2010 by German contemporary artist tadiROCK, her partner Nico Zeh and ABSOLUT Vodka, a visionary brand that fosters creative collaborations for over 30 years.

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Everything Any Artist Needs to Know About How to Price Their Art

Everything Any Artist Needs to Know About How to Price Their Art | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
Monika Fleischmann's insight:

Quantifying Creativity
How Any Artist Can Price Their Art for Sale


Pricing your art is different from making art; it's something you do with your art after it's made, when it's ready to leave your studio and get sold either by you personally or through a gallery, at an art fair, online, at open studios, through an agent or representative, wherever. Making art is about the individual personal creative process, experiences that come from within; pricing art for sale is about what's happening on the outside, in the real world where things are bought and sold for money, and where market forces dictate in large part how much those things are worth. 

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A class in the art of trash talk | UCLA

A class in the art of trash talk | UCLA | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it
Studying the depictions of garbage in art, documenatry and pop culture forces us to talk about a topic many consider taboo and trivial.
Monika Fleischmann's insight:

Starting a movie with nearly 40 dialogue-free minutes of a machine compacting trash on a humanless, garbage-covered Earth doesn’t sound like the recipe for an Oscar-winning hit.

So how did "WALL-E," the 2008 Pixar film about a small robot with big, expressive eyes who methodically converts mountains of garbage into small cubes of trash, gross more than $500 million worldwide?

UCLA professor Maite Zubiaurre is challenging the students in her graduate seminar that examines how trash is portrayed in art and pop culture to figure that out. And, more importantly, she’s asking what it says about us and our culture that we have turned a movie set primarily in a world of trash into a blockbuster.

"In ‘WALL-E,’ you have an opportunity to enjoy a landscape that you would in reality never enjoy," said Zubiaurre, a professor of Spanish & Portuguese and Germanic Languages in the College of Letters and Science. "It’s the hygienic experience of terror and dirt. It’s like the fun of playing with dirt without the danger."

Zubiaurre uses artistic, documentary and pop-culture portrayals of and references to garbage to get the academic world talking about a topic many consider taboo and trivial.

"People don’t want to talk about trash," Zubiaurre said. "As one of the documentaries I’ve watched said: ‘The only thing we care about with trash is that we leave trash on our curbside, and the next morning it is gone … "

 
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A Wearable Concept Camera That ‘Flies’ Off Your Wrist, Takes Your Photo

A Wearable Concept Camera That ‘Flies’ Off Your Wrist, Takes Your Photo | [New] Media Art Education & Research | Scoop.it


Instead of fumbling with stick mounts the next time you try to take a solo photo of yourself, perhaps you need a flying camera “drone” to get it done. Meet Nixie, a concept of “the first wearable camera that can fly”, offering users a hands-free photo-taking experience. 

With a flick of your wrist, Nixie, which looks like a tiny drone, detaches itself from your wristband and flies away “past your arms’ reach” to snap your photo before returning to your wrist. 


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▶ Drone Shows Thousands Filling Hong Kong Streets - YouTube

Thousands of demonstrators turned out in downtown Hong Kong on September 29 to support a protest over Beijing’s decision to reject calls for open nominations...
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