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New marketing & Team Management
Curated by Jacek Olchowik
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9 Things Businesses Shouldn't Do On Social Media @Forbes

9 Things Businesses Shouldn't Do On Social Media @Forbes | New Marketing & Team Management | Scoop.it

Use social media the right way, and you can attract new customers and boost your business. Use it the wrong way, and you can spark a backlash that’ll melt your reputation to a sticky puddle.


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Markose Abraham's curator insight, January 1, 2013 12:37 AM

Yes. Use Social media the right way.....

The Fish Firm's comment, January 1, 2013 9:13 PM
When we're transparent ~ it always works out! No matter what!
Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, February 20, 2013 9:12 AM
Les entreprises 9 choses ne devriez pas faire sur les médias sociaux @ Forbes

Utiliser les médias sociaux dans le bon sens, et vous pouvez attirer de nouveaux clients et booster votre business. Utilisez le mauvais sens, et vous pouvez déclencher une réaction qui va faire fondre votre réputation à une flaque collante.


9 Things Businesses Shouldn't Do On Social Media @Forbes http://sco.lt/...


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102 Compelling Social Media and Online Marketing Stats and Facts for 2012 @Webbiquity

102 Compelling Social Media and Online Marketing Stats and Facts for 2012 @Webbiquity | New Marketing & Team Management | Scoop.it
What do buyers really want from social media? What's the source of the largest share of social traffic to websites? (It's not what you almost certainly think.)

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Eduardo Malagón's curator insight, January 9, 2013 6:20 AM

This is a great job with a lot of interesting info!

ben bernard's comment, January 13, 2013 9:14 PM
my new scoops http://www.scoop.it/t/direct-marketing-services
Bella Fairchild's curator insight, January 14, 2013 3:50 PM

Demographicss are important to know

 

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Looking at Digital Business in 2013

Looking at Digital Business in 2013 | New Marketing & Team Management | Scoop.it
With 2012 just behind us, organizations are feeling the pressure to update their aging ways of engaging with the marketplace more than ever before. . Topic: Social Business

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EZIA's curator insight, February 3, 2013 12:42 AM

If you don't move your business into a "Social Business" - you may miss the boat.  Good article.

Andrea Rossi's curator insight, March 4, 2013 11:05 AM

Seamless experiences and tourism digital ecosystems: the next steps in tourism evolution

Charlley Luz's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:51 PM

Para quem ainda não entendeu a dierença entre o antes e o agora.

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Team organization in scrum development

Team organization in scrum development | New Marketing & Team Management | Scoop.it
Related Posts:Agile: From the Business Analysts’ perspectiveUser Documentation in an Agile Development EnvironmentRequirements Elicitation – Important QuestionsSelection of right Code Analyzer tools to build first time rightAgile development is not...

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Billy R Bennett's curator insight, January 3, 2013 4:01 PM

This article by Anil Giri addresses a problem SCRUM practictioners have experienced: A "too large" and "too distributed" team.   However, rather than allowing the team to fail by stopping the project he suggests ways to work around the challenges and considerations to make next time.


I like Anil's approach for a few reasons - first he's right.  I say that not from experience, but also from the best team research.  Co-location is the term for putting people in the same physical space to work as a team.  In a previous article I noted the necessity of team members needing to build skills in a co-located team before doing too much work in virtual - remote member - project teams. 


Here are some other lessons he offers that can be adapted for any team based challenge:

  • Restructure the teams to form relatively smaller teams so daily scrum meetings can be completed in 10-15 minutes.My Note: This logic applies to any team. The sweet spot for the most effective work has been shown to be in the 6-8 member team.  More than that and interaction becomes to complex, and individuals can retreat from work too easily.
  • Introduce one facilitator for every team for on-the-spot resolution of queries(the facilitator has business knowledge and development background). This person may have to facilitate multiple teams, as the facilitator doesn’t do actual development - My Note: Most businesses fail to use facilitators effectively - they confuse them with trainers rather than process guides who keep things on track and works through roadblocks.  Speed and focus increases. 
  • Facilitator re-orders the priority of defects in sprint on a daily basis - My Note:Some pre-staging of issues helps teams to hit the ground running on key projects.  While there can be time-outs for larger group discussions, most of the time these can be quickly identified for them and their agreement.
  • Introduce daily open office meeting with architects and product owners to discuss big impact issues/show stopper issues.My Note:These are issues which could not be resolved by the facilitator or support people. "Anybody can join this meeting and raise a concern."  In a standard work environment this is the purpose of some Daily Operating System meeting.  Wins are aknowledged but assessing and assigning losses and barrier removal are the purpose.  


Do you have a team challenge that you would like to be a focus of an article or blog response?  Leave a comment or email me at Billy@pyramidodi.com


www.pyramidodi.com


Os Ishmael's curator insight, January 8, 2013 5:31 PM

This article by Anil Giri addresses a problem SCRUM practictioners have experienced: A "too large" and "too distributed" team.   However, rather than allowing the team to fail by stopping the project he suggests ways to work around the challenges and considerations to make next time.

 

I like Anil's approach for a few reasons - first he's right.  I say that not from experience, but also from the best team research.  Co-location is the term for putting people in the same physical space to work as a team.  In a previous article I noted the necessity of team members needing to build skills in a co-located team before doing too much work in virtual - remote member - project teams. 

 

Here are some other lessons he offers that can be adapted for any team based challenge:

Restructure the teams to form relatively smaller teams so daily scrum meetings can be completed in 10-15 minutes.My Note: This logic applies to any team. The sweet spot for the most effective work has been shown to be in the 6-8 member team.  More than that and interaction becomes to complex, and individuals can retreat from work too easily.Introduce one facilitator for every team for on-the-spot resolution of queries(the facilitator has business knowledge and development background). This person may have to facilitate multiple teams, as the facilitator doesn’t do actual development - My Note: Most businesses fail to use facilitators effectively - they confuse the with trainers rather than process guides who keep things on track and works through roadblocks.  Speed and focus increases. Facilitator re-orders the priority of defects in sprint on a daily basis - My Note:Some pre-staging of issues helps teams to hit the ground running on key projects.  While there can be time-outs for larger group discussions, most of the time these can be quickly identified for them and their agreement.Introduce daily open office meeting with architects and product owners to discuss big impact issues/show stopper issues.My Note:These are issues which could not be resolved by the facilitator or support people. "Anybody can join this meeting and raise a concern."  In a standard work environment this is the purpose of some Daily Operating System meeting.  Wins are aknowledged but assessing and assigning losses and barrier removal are the purpose.  

 

Do you have a team challenge that you would like to be a focus of an article or blog response?  Leave a comment or email me at Billy@pyramidodi.com

 

www.pyramidodi.com

 

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Teaming in the Twenty-First Century — HBS Working Knowledge

Teaming in the Twenty-First Century — HBS Working Knowledge | New Marketing & Team Management | Scoop.it
Today's teams are not well designed for getting work done in the twenty-first century, argues Professor Amy C. Edmondson . One starting point: learn the skill of teaming.

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Billy R Bennett's curator insight, January 2, 2013 6:48 PM

Take care of the point


If you are not careful you will miss the point of Amy Edmondson's book - teaming is a necessary skill - not only for the organization but for individuals.  However, most organizations have not desinged work to take advantage of  the power of team work or to develop teaming skills.  Project teams do not create the same type of team skills that work teams (longer term single focused teams) create.  


What's the difference?


Imagine that you are  are asked to join a scouting patrol on a battlefield.  Your choice is to work in a unit where the team members are picked at random and then disband at the end of the patrol.   The other choice is with a team that has had the same team members for several weeks...maybe months.  Which one would you trust to have the skills necessary to succeed?  In most cases, the second team would be my choice.  The best team skills are developed in small units (6-8 being most ideal) with enough time to challenge, test and develop each member and the group as a whole.     


For many years now, organizations skipped basic work team formations and have tried to work soley with temporary project teams.  They have done this to take short cuts to results.  However, when you bypass they flow of work in the usual organization integration and sustainability becomes problematic. 


What's the opportunity?


Work system design...or redesign.  Design work systems where teams are the main unit of work.  Make sure you support the success of these teams and your temporary project teams will get better...automatically.


In the late 80's and early 90's significant effort was put in by some organizations to do just that they redesigned work to maximize the performance of team units.  They were called self-managing, or self-directed, or "work cells".  Results were mixed depending upon the design and understanding of leadership of how Team System functions and how to sustain results and maintain skills.  Those that did this well found they were also significantly more successful with temporary, project teams. 


Work today is not more fast paced than before - it just looks like it is due to the chaos most organizations create with ineffective work design and disconnected processes, and inadequete tools.

  

Do you want to move forward with your teams?  Try taking a step back and rethinking how work should...well, work.


Billy Bennett and Pyramid ODI have helped a number of organizaitons revitalize performance with improved design of teambased work systems>



www.pyramidodi.com