New Leadership
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New Leadership
The Changing Face of Modern Leadership
Curated by Roger Francis
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Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style

Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style | New Leadership | Scoop.it

First-time managers often ask themselves how to develop a leadership style that suits them: “Who should I model myself after? What kind of leader should I be?” It’s great to think critically about your approach to managing others, particularly when you’re new to it, but these questions won’t exactly help you.

 

That’s because they assume that leadership is something you try on and show off, a “style” that’s curated and intentional. But especially in the beginning, your style will be based far less on mirroring others’ habits and behaviors and far more on instinct and intuition. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 8, 6:58 PM

To develop a leadership style that’s authentic to you, let it take shape organically, not through intentional curation.

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How Becoming A Good Listener Can Make You A Better Leader

How Becoming A Good Listener Can Make You A Better Leader | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Running a business is an inherently emotional experience. Even the most stoic leaders are bound to find themselves becoming invested not only in outcomes, but in people and processes as well.

 

While emotional leadership is often regarded as a liability, lack of personal investment can also bring about negative outcomes.

 

I’ve learned that the best leaders are those who can recognize emotionally-charged situations, rise above the passions of the movement, and maintain a level head. Good leaders are quick to listen and slow to anger.


Via The Learning Factor, Create Wise Leader
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leafprovide's comment, July 31, 4:50 AM
Like teaching (educate and pedagogy are etymologically about leading) leading is about listening first. Sometimes asking questions furthers the conversation and understanding of others. They solve their problems.
libertopereda's curator insight, July 31, 4:09 PM

What does it mean to listen? Listening points to four levels: what we can see and hear, the emotions and thoughts, the sensations and what's wanting to emerge (or not). How much of our listening is directed to each of these four levels? Do we really listen when we speak? Do we listen inwards, outwards, both, or neither? Listening comes from the feminine side of us, specially deep listening. What is needed for a deeper listening? What is all this noise telling us?

Andrew Man's curator insight, August 5, 4:05 PM
Good leaders listens first
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The 5 Traits That Define Great Leadership

The 5 Traits That Define Great Leadership | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Great teams are led by great leaders, and great leaders all share traits that are absolutely essential to their ability to lead. These are the 5 most important traits leaders have - if you're a leader, they will transform the way you lead for mind-blowingly rewarding results.


Via The Learning Factor, Kevin Watson
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 19, 5:33 PM

Great teams are led by great leaders, and great leaders all share traits that are absolutely essential to their ability to lead.

Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, February 24, 7:42 AM
PDGLead
Ann Zaslow-Rethaber's curator insight, March 2, 11:26 AM

Fantastic points on what characteristics make a good leader. I would also add transparency, I have found that employees thrive when having a very clear picture of what earns an A and conversely what  merits an F. It is very disconcerting for employees when working for someone when they are never quite sure where they stand,  

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Does Your Company's Purpose Resonate With Everyone, Or Just Senior Leaders?

Does Your Company's Purpose Resonate With Everyone, Or Just Senior Leaders? | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Discovering your company's "purpose" is tough. Sustaining it can be even tougher. Even if you've zeroed in on a mission that your executives love, it won't do your company much good if the rest of your team doesn't share the same sentiment.

 

The challenge is to make sure your entire organization is willing to buy into its stated purpose. The consulting firm Radley Yeldar, which ranks brands according to "social purpose," gives the top spot to Unilever for its sustainability efforts, among other causes beyond the company's bottom line to which it has shown commitment.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 10, 2016 5:58 PM

If your own employees write off your shiny new mission statement as just another marketing trick, so will your customers.

Peter Krull's curator insight, November 10, 2016 8:53 PM
Mission & purpose are critical at Krull & Company!
Pam Ross's curator insight, November 15, 2016 8:33 AM
Connecting employees to purpose is so important for culture, trust, engagement, accountability.
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How To Eliminate Performance Reviews In Your Organisation

How To Eliminate Performance Reviews In Your Organisation | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Performance reviews don’t work. They are disliked by managers and employees alike. They are usually poorly written and disappear as soon as they are completed. Everyone knows this but most are not going to admit it.

 

Primarily, it’s because everyone agrees that employee feedback is important, but HR departments don’t always trust this exchange to happen without forcing everyone through a formal process. So they spend three months a year chasing up everyone in the organisation in a system that is often measured by quantity over quality. Some HR professionals even lose part of their bonuses if 100 percent of them are not completed in their business unit. It doesn’t have to be this way.


Via The Learning Factor, HR Trend Institute
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 30, 2013 8:02 PM

One area frequently missed during performance feedback meetings is a discussion of the employee’s future. From an engagement perspective, discussing the future is more important than discussing the past and should be wrapped into your regular feedback discussions with your employees.

www.eajoblist.com's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:27 PM

http://board.eajoblist.com  

Thomas Bordenave's curator insight, June 27, 7:46 AM

One area frequently missed during performance feedback meetings is a discussion of the employee’s future. From an engagement perspective, discussing the future is more important than discussing the past and should be wrapped into your regular feedback discussions with your employees.

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The Power of Conversational Leadership — HBS Working Knowledge

The Power of Conversational Leadership — HBS Working Knowledge | New Leadership | Scoop.it

"In many cases you have an executive team that's so sure about company strategy, but then you go inside the organization and find that nobody else has a clue,"


A strategic conversation based on 4 elements:

Intimacy is about leadership. Interactivity is about channels. Inclusion is about content. Intentionality is about goals, vision, and the strategy of getting things done.


Via Sabrina Murphy, Roy Sheneman, PhD, AlGonzalezinfo
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This Three-Word Phrase Is Subtly Undermining Your Authority

This Three-Word Phrase Is Subtly Undermining Your Authority | New Leadership | Scoop.it

You don’t need to be told why it matters to be transparent and honest at work–that much is a given. So is the overall usefulness of expressing yourself clearly, confidently, and with as few filler words as possible. But in the effort to do that, many of us fall back on common expressions that might sound totally fine in social situations but can do some quiet damage in the workplace. One of them is “I’m sorry.” Another is “to be honest.”

 

The latter turn of phrase–and versions of it, like “honestly,” “frankly,” “if I can be honest with you,” or “let me be frank”–is easy to resort to when you want to cut through the crap, come clean, or offer your unvarnished opinion. But these expressions also tend to attach themselves to–and subtly encourage–certain messages that are either better left unsaid or ought to be rephrased. Here are times when “to be honest” can make you sound less authoritative around the office.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 6, 7:07 PM

Sounding confident, transparent, and truthful doesn’t require any prefaces.

Hatcat's comment, August 6, 11:51 PM
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khoj in india's curator insight, August 8, 11:53 AM

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How Can You Spot a Really Good Leader? They Do Any of These 7 Things Daily

How Can You Spot a Really Good Leader? They Do Any of These 7 Things Daily | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Can you imagine working for someone in a high-level leadership role, perhaps a CEO, and suddenly it dawns on you: This person isn't leadership caliber.

Your next thought may be, How in the world did he (or she) make it this far up the ladder?

It's a fair question. People are promoted into leadership roles every day who have no business belonging there.

Sometimes it's political; other times it's the easier choice--promote from within and avoid the high cost of recruitment--but a bad choice, nonetheless.

The biggest challenge leaders face is performing to the set standards of the best in the business. This means raising the bar really high--as the ten hugely successful CEOs I wrote about recently have done.

In the end, you'll find the leadership journey is predicated on two things that drive success: Results and relationships. You can't have results at the expense of people. And serving your tribe well without getting results is merely putting lipstick on a pig.


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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 24, 1:00 AM
I guess this says it all! Leadership is not everybody's cup of tea! The biggest challenge faced in leadership positions is to perform to a very high set of standards.However, all is not lost for those who are struggling with leadership roles, as they can always make use of some of the tips given in this article!
 
Susan Claudia Freeman's curator insight, April 24, 11:49 AM
There are remarkable differences between LEADERS and MANAGERS...
 
Lisa Gorman's curator insight, April 25, 12:23 AM

www.inc.com provide us with some useful ideas here about what 'really good' leaders to at work.  I've been thinking about the strategies offered; 1. giving feedback 2. regular team planning sessions 3. conducting stay interviews 4. recognition & appreciation 5. freedom to make decisions 6. allowing people to take on new responsibilities 7. open-door policy.  All of these rely on the fundamentally critical technical skill of being able to give and receive feedback and the heart-connected qualities that allow people to thrive because you want them to do their best.  For me, really good leaders empower people to succeed.  Allowing freedom is great, but to do this without building trust and sound relationships first, could be an action taken too soon. Interesting topic!  

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4 Reasons Great Leaders Don't Need to Criticize

4 Reasons Great Leaders Don't Need to Criticize | New Leadership | Scoop.it

I have a fundamental belief about the kind of people I try to employ. And that's that they're going to be harder on themselves than I'll ever need to be. I also believe that the concept of constructive criticism is overrated, if not an outright fallacy. Your employees are either aware of problems with their performance, or they're not.

 

The best way to find out which category they're in is through asking questions and listening. Let's look at some of the reasons this passive approach to problem-solving is good for both of you.


Via The Learning Factor, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Adele Taylor's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:11 PM
Perfect read for all leaders/mentors/managers
starbutane's comment, November 19, 2016 1:35 AM
Nice one
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Six Things Great Bosses Constantly Remind Their Teams

Six Things Great Bosses Constantly Remind Their Teams | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Whether you’ve just started training your first hire or you’ve been managing scores of people for decades, you’re in the position of being a leader. And if there’s one aspect of leadership that holds true, regardless of staff size or industry, it’s that being one isn’t for the thin-skinned or the faint of heart.
 

So much of your job isn’t about hitting goals, but rather about being rooted in reality, constantly striving to bring perspective and empathy to whatever situations you encounter. Sometimes, finding the right words can be the biggest challenge of your day. But other times, you’re overthinking it, and it’s as simple as saying these six tiny sentences.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 8, 2016 5:22 PM

Great leaders tell their team members over and over again to speak their minds and to say no to the right things.

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How HR Can Help New Leaders

How HR Can Help New Leaders | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Via Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)
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Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, July 16, 2013 9:28 AM

Co-author of the book 'The Ascending Leader' says "more than three-quarters of the time, leaders who fail do so because of poor assimilation to the culture of their new workplace."

 

HR has an important role to partner with new leaders early on: "HR professionals should advise them to study and understand the culture first so the new executives can ensure that their proposed changes are a good fit for the company."

 

"In addition, HR professionals can help leaders assess and understand their strengths and weaknesses as they take on a new role—even if it’s within the same company."