New Leadership
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New Leadership
The Changing Face of Modern Leadership
Curated by Roger Francis
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From Humble Leader to Narcissist: Where Are You on the Continuum?

From Humble Leader to Narcissist: Where Are You on the Continuum? | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Typically, narcissism is historically associated with physical beauty.

You may recall that in Greek mythology, Narcissus was the handsome young man who became so enchanted with the image of himself in the pool that he could not pull away.

Today we hear about a leader who has narcissistic tendencies, but it’s not so much about their physical beauty as their strong, offensive ego.

Where do fit on the narcissistic leadership continuum? Pinpoint your spot –

Via David Hain
Roger Francis's insight:

Nice video on the narcissism spectrum. Where would youplace Hillary, Barack and Trump?

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Kevin Watson's curator insight, March 18, 2016 5:56 AM

Nice video on the narcissism spectrum. Where would youplace Hillary, Barack and Trump?

nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 18, 2016 8:36 AM

Nice video on the narcissism spectrum. Where would youplace Hillary, Barack and Trump?

Johan Meiring Van Zyl's curator insight, April 4, 2016 8:48 AM

Nice video on the narcissism spectrum. Where would youplace Hillary, Barack and Trump?

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Why Become a Leader?

Leadership can manifest itself in small ways and large ones. The author provides an example of each, explaining the many ways a person can make a difference.

Via Kevin Watson
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The 4 C’s of Generative Leadership 

The 4 C’s of Generative Leadership  | New Leadership | Scoop.it
What is the true meaning of leadership? I guess it depends upon who you ask. Some may say that leadership is about authority. Others may define leadership as the capacity to have a vision and inspire others to support it. Many speak to leadership from the standpoint of direction and decision-making. And still others define …

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4 Traits of Exceptional Leaders

4 Traits of Exceptional Leaders | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Not every person is fortunate enough to have ever worked closely with and learned from a truly exceptional leader. And when Gallup reports that just 10% of people even have the talent necessary to be…

Via Anne Leong
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How to Avoid the Biggest Mistake Leaders Make

How to Avoid the Biggest Mistake Leaders Make | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Over 1,400 people were presented a list of common leadership mistakes and were asked to select the top five. Two of them stood out clearly from the rest: Not providing appropriate feedback was chosen by 82%, with failing to listen or involve others a close second, chosen by 81%. (Failing to use an appropriate leadership style, failing…

Via Anne Leong
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Matthew Farmer's curator insight, March 21, 2016 7:43 AM

Very interesting to see the importance of good listening and effective feedback in day to day leadership situations.

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How Strong Cultures Help Companies Win Talent — and Customers, Too

How Strong Cultures Help Companies Win Talent — and Customers, Too | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders tend to focus on the internal benefits of culture — the ability to retain talent and improve performance. But the benefits of a strong culture also have huge external benefits, and are the primary driver not only in deciding with whom to do business, but also how long the relationship will last. These are the findings of Beyond the Brand: Why Business Decision Makers Buy into Strong Cultures, by the Fortune Knowledge Group in collaboration with gyro. Culture is a powerful differentiator The study found a majority of executives want to do business with companies that live by their values, and they rely on intangible differentiators (such as culture or reputation) more than quantifiable differentiators as a way of judging potential business partners. The same attributes are equally likely to make a company desirable to work for as to work with. So here’s what researchers suggest to create a successful culture. Stand for something — When choosing a corporate partner, 59 percent of executives say that knowing what values a company stands for is much more important than innovation (22 percent) or market dominance (20 percent). “Clear communication of your organization’s purpose provides a bond that increases the brand value with existing and potential customers,” says Bob Aiken, CEO of Essendant. Live by your mission and share your goals — Tying day-to-day operations back to your “why” is powerful. Some 81 percent of executives feel companies that are successful at building long-term relationships make a direct correlation between what they believe in and the way they conduct their business. And all stakeholders — both internal and external — should have the opportunity to share in its purpose. Put your culture to work — A strong sense of purpose helps a company attract better quality employees and enables employees to act more collaboratively, both internally and externally. And the benefits extend beyond the walls of the business – 89 percent of respondents agree great companies build cultures that consistently create excellent customer experiences. “If a company isn’t communicating its mission, then it will miss out on the next generation of rising stars, because the best people won’t want to work there,” says Kreg Weigand, VP of Internal Audit at Target. “People have to feel connected to the organization and feel there is a larger purpose overall.” Be different — Culture is an important factor in building successful long-term relationships, but when corporate ties fray, it won’t be because of cultural differences. Much more damaging is losing trust (72 percent) or internal policies that prevent collaboration (69 percent). Measuring the benefits of a strong culture Corporate culture may seem hard to quantify, but it is possible, as Harvard Business School Professor Emeritus James Heskett argues in The Culture Cycle: How to Shape the Unseen Force that Transforms Performance. “Organizational culture is not a soft concept,” he says. “Its impact on profit can be measured and quantified. Culturally committed employees are more likely to remain in an organization, leading to lower hiring costs, higher productivity, stronger customer loyalty, and better sales.” His research shows that, overall, up to half the difference in operating profit between companies can be attributed to strong cultures. At a time when trust and reputation are so highly valued, yet in such short supply, companies have a responsibility to consider the best ways to develop strong corporate relationships that will last. Leaders need to reprioritize their company’s most important assets to take full account of the human factors that are important for cementing long-term relationships with employees and customers. The post originally appeared in a somewhat different form on OCTanner.com
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7 Valuable Skills That Top Leaders and High Achievers Have Mastered

7 Valuable Skills That Top Leaders and High Achievers Have Mastered | New Leadership | Scoop.it
1. A well-developed personal philosophy

Successful leaders know what their philosophy is; they understand their thinking and their reasoning. A clear philosophy allows you to set your expectations and articulate your definition of success so you can set a clear path to your goals. It prepares you for an extraordinary destiny.

2. Undeniable persistence

Edison failed 2,000 times before he discovered electricity. John Chambers overcame dyslexia to build Cisco. People who are successful never quit, and people who succeed never give up. When failure is never an option, you don't give up. You find another contact, another way, another point of entry, and you keep trying until you accomplish what you have set out to do. Persistence means picking yourself up every day and going after what you want without allowing anything to get in your way.


Via The Learning Factor
Roger Francis's insight:

Your traits and attributes shape you more than anything else. Successful leaders know what their philosophy is; they understand their thinking and their reasoning.

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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, March 21, 2016 6:02 PM

Your traits and attributes shape you more than anything else. Successful leaders know what their philosophy is; they understand their thinking and their reasoning.

Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, March 22, 2016 9:11 AM

Your traits and attributes shape you more than anything else. Successful leaders know what their philosophy is; they understand their thinking and their reasoning.

Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, March 27, 2016 1:49 PM

Your traits and attributes shape you more than anything else. Successful leaders know what their philosophy is; they understand their thinking and their reasoning.

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Overcoming Challenges

Overcoming Challenges | New Leadership | Scoop.it
All of us at some point in our lives will encounter challenges. Some people will succumb and give up, while others will try their best to work on it until they overcome and learn the lessons.
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Building the Bridge Between Leadership Theory and Practice

Building the Bridge Between Leadership Theory and Practice | New Leadership | Scoop.it
In life, there are lots of things that sound great in theory, but don’t turn out to be so simple when it comes to putting them into practice. It can also be easier to “know it when you see it” than to know what to do when a situation or opportunity arises.

So, how can you intentionally and readily forge that seemingly mysterious link between theory and practice? Let me tackle the question by using leadership theory as an example.

Via David Hain
Roger Francis's insight:

You know the theories, but growth depends on the practice. @SusanMazza on how to marry the two!

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David Hain's curator insight, March 14, 2016 5:48 AM

You know the theories, but growth depends on the practice. @SusanMazza on how to marry the two!

Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 15, 2016 2:07 AM

You know the theories, but growth depends on the practice. @SusanMazza on how to marry the two!

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 2016 7:58 AM

You know the theories, but growth depends on the practice. @SusanMazza on how to marry the two!

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The Shackleton Spirit: How to lead our teams through change | Training Journal

The Shackleton Spirit: How to lead our teams through change | Training Journal | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Jean Gamester explains how business owners and managers can find inspiration from Shackleton when leading their teams through change.
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5 Ways Leaders Can Raise Their Emotional Intelligence

5 Ways Leaders Can Raise Their Emotional Intelligence | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Prioritizing emotional intelligence and being able to assess the emotional intelligence of others can help you be more effective in life and work.

Via Kevin Watson
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David Wise's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:14 PM
Management - My Managerial aspirations are based around how to treat employees correctly. Emotional Intelligence is a key function in being a inclusive leader.
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8 Powerful Ways Leaders With Conviction Motivate Us

8 Powerful Ways Leaders With Conviction Motivate Us | New Leadership | Scoop.it
When a leader is absolutely convinced that he's chosen the best course of action, everyone who follows him unconsciously absorbs this belief and the accompanying emotional state.

Via donhornsby, Create Wise Leader, Roy Sheneman, PhD
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donhornsby's curator insight, February 2, 2016 5:49 PM

(From the article): Leaders with conviction create an environment of certainty for everyone. When a leader is absolutely convinced that he’s chosen the best course of action, everyone who follows him unconsciously absorbs this belief and the accompanying emotional state. Mirror neurons are responsible for this involuntary response. They mirror the emotional states of other people—especially those we look to for guidance. This ensures that leaders with conviction put us at ease.

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Leadership is an Art - People Development Network

Leadership is an Art - People Development Network | New Leadership | Scoop.it
I believe that leadership is about influencing people to achieve a common goal. To that end, I believe that leadership is an art. 

Via The People Development Network
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Leaders, Build Your Success on Trust

Leaders, Build Your Success on Trust | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Leadership can be a complex endeavor— but it doesn’t have to be. People tend to make things more convoluted than they need to be. To prove the point, go to Amazon.com and search their book listings for the word “leadership.” More than 180,000 entries will come up. Browsing the titles of some popular best-sellers might lead some to believe that to be a successful leader, they need to find the magical keys, take the right steps, follow the proper laws, figure out the dysfunctions, embrace . . .


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How Mindful Leaders Manage Change: Adapting When the Status Quo Fails

How Mindful Leaders Manage Change: Adapting When the Status Quo Fails | New Leadership | Scoop.it

In today’s ever-mutating and fast-paced business landscape, change is unavoidable—and often strikes quickly. The key to managing change is to learn how to maintain emotional composure and clarity when alterations occur in your environment. But it can be difficult to adapt to the transformation happening, whether it’s internal and external, with your sanity and composure intact.

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Vulnerability, the Advantage of Leaders Who Don’t Pretend

Vulnerability, the Advantage of Leaders Who Don’t Pretend | New Leadership | Scoop.it
By Tracy Clark - Why leaders must be honest, and, at times, step out in vulnerability to create the systemic change we all wish to see.

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You’ve Got to Serve Someone

You’ve Got to Serve Someone | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Servant leadership is not a new concept. Robert Greenleaf introduced the idea back in 1977. In recent years, however, concrete evidence has emerged that the approach delivers more than warm, fuzzy feelings. Last month, the first quantitative study that begins to explain a connection between servant leadership and improved individual performance was published by researchers in Canada. This new evidence may help move servant leadership from a niche practice to one adopted by more executives.

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:38 AM
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 16, 2016 1:01 PM
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up. This is a concept that is long overdue. If we practiced the hard work of true servant-leadership in schools, what a difference that would make.
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Why A Leader's Vision Is Better Informed By The Past

Why A Leader's Vision Is Better Informed By The Past | New Leadership | Scoop.it
We make sense of our world retrospectively, with understanding coming from reflection. So to create a vision of the future, first look back!

Via Kevin Watson, Jaro Berce
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The 7 Qualities of People Who Are Highly Respected

The 7 Qualities of People Who Are Highly Respected | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Leaders are judged on their results and respected for how well they treat people.

Via donhornsby
Roger Francis's insight:
(From the article): Be willing to change. Being intractable won’t get you anywhere. Realize that the process of evolution includes change. Make an effort to grow as a person; learn new skills, try new activities, and especially, re-examine your automatic behaviors. And don’t forget to congratulate yourself on progress you make along the way to becoming a better person.
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Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:20 AM
(From the article): Be willing to change. Being intractable won’t get you anywhere. Realize that the process of evolution includes change. Make an effort to grow as a person; learn new skills, try new activities, and especially, re-examine your automatic behaviors. And don’t forget to congratulate yourself on progress you make along the way to becoming a better person.
nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:07 AM
(From the article): Be willing to change. Being intractable won’t get you anywhere. Realize that the process of evolution includes change. Make an effort to grow as a person; learn new skills, try new activities, and especially, re-examine your automatic behaviors. And don’t forget to congratulate yourself on progress you make along the way to becoming a better person.
Cameron Larsuel's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:55 PM
(From the article): Be willing to change. Being intractable won’t get you anywhere. Realize that the process of evolution includes change. Make an effort to grow as a person; learn new skills, try new activities, and especially, re-examine your automatic behaviors. And don’t forget to congratulate yourself on progress you make along the way to becoming a better person.
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The 6 Factors That Drive Engagement for Managers

The 6 Factors That Drive Engagement for Managers | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Being a manager can be an awfully lonely job. You get scrutinized for every move you make, and you rarely receive any bottom-up recognition — if you ever do. There’s no shortage of content written about employee engagement from the workers’ point of view. But engagement for managers isn’t talked about nearly as often, if it ever is.

It should be.
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7 Things Leaders Can Do to be Refreshingly Different

7 Things Leaders Can Do to be Refreshingly Different | New Leadership | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago I was jamming to the radio while traveling to a meeting. Paused at a stoplight, I glanced at the car to my right. The driver met my eyes, shook his head, and made the cuckoo gesture. I smiled and kept on singing.
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Leaders: Respect Is Not a Given - Switch & Shift

Leaders: Respect Is Not a Given - Switch & Shift | New Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the critical lessons I’ve learned in life – and it extends beyond the workplace – is the importance of respect. This may seem old-fashioned or trite in the days of, “I got mine, go get yours.” But if you treat people right, you will get the results you want. This is especially true in business. Respect still matters!

Great leaders appreciate every job that is done well; it doesn’t matter whether it’s in the C-suite or the mailroom. Great leaders also understand that respect isn’t an entitlement linked to a particular job title. They need to respect others before others will respect them.

So, how do you earn respect in business? Here are 10 ways:
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Why Creative People Are Rarely Seen as Leaders

Why Creative People Are Rarely Seen as Leaders | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Susan Cain

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
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8 Ways the best leaders coach their teams 

8 Ways the best leaders coach their teams  | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Great leaders help people grow in real, concrete, and tangible ways. Anything less isn’t coaching. The best leaders challenge at least a few different things: 

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Are Our Leaders Losing their Humility?

Are Our Leaders Losing their Humility? | New Leadership | Scoop.it

A plea for more humble leaders, secinded here!The word humility is often misunderstood. Dictionaries define it as “a modest opinion of one’s own importance,” “the quality of not thinking you are better than other people,” and “self-restraint from excessive vanity.” It is certainly not false modesty or disavowing one’s accomplishments.

Humility derives from an inner sense of self-worth. Humble leaders are grounded by their beliefs, their values, and the principles by which they lead. Ultimately, they know to lead is to serve their customers, employees, investors, communities, and ultimately, society through their work.


Via David Hain
Roger Francis's insight:

A plea for more humble leaders, seconded here!

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 11, 2016 8:21 AM

(From the article): Humility derives from an inner sense of self-worth. Humble leaders are grounded by their beliefs, their values, and the principles by which they lead. Ultimately, they know to lead is to serve their customers, employees, investors, communities, and ultimately, society through their work.

Humility is an essential quality for authentic leaders. People trust them because they know they are genuine, honest, and sincere. Lacking those qualities, people live in fear and doubt – not exactly the ingredients to bring out the best in people. In difficult times, people rely on humble leaders even more to get them through crises.

Martin McGaha's curator insight, March 11, 2016 12:11 PM

(From the article): Humility derives from an inner sense of self-worth. Humble leaders are grounded by their beliefs, their values, and the principles by which they lead. Ultimately, they know to lead is to serve their customers, employees, investors, communities, and ultimately, society through their work.

Humility is an essential quality for authentic leaders. People trust them because they know they are genuine, honest, and sincere. Lacking those qualities, people live in fear and doubt – not exactly the ingredients to bring out the best in people. In difficult times, people rely on humble leaders even more to get them through crises.

Johan Meiring Van Zyl's curator insight, April 4, 2016 8:47 AM

A plea for more humble leaders, seconded here!