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The John Maxwell Company

The John Maxwell Company | New Leadership | Scoop.it
The 5 Levels of Leadership http://t.co/eIE3Ww3BVV

Via John Michel, David Hain, Roy Sheneman, PhD
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John Michel's curator insight, November 23, 2013 6:33 AM

Pinnacle leaders stand out from everyone else. They are a cut above, and they seem to bring success with them wherever they go. Leadership at this high level lifts the entire organization and creates an environment that benefits everyone in it, contributing to their success. Level 5 leaders often possess an influence that transcends the organization and the industry the leader works in.

David Hain's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:50 AM

Are you aiming for the Pinnacle?

New Leadership
The Changing Face of Modern Leadership
Curated by Roger Francis
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How Smart Leaders Build Trust

How Smart Leaders Build Trust | New Leadership | Scoop.it
The chairman of JetBlue explains how a high-trust culture makes a better company (and life).
Via Rami Kantari
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Managing the Challenges of “Coopetition”

Managing the Challenges of “Coopetition” | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Sometimes the best way to stay competitive is not to compete. It may be less risky than you think.

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4 Keys to Winning Gold in the Leadership Olympics

4 Keys to Winning Gold in the Leadership Olympics | New Leadership | Scoop.it
August 5th is the opening of the 31st modern Olympiad in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 10,000 athletes from 206 countries will compete in 42 different sports, and for many of them, it will be the penultimate event of their athletic careers. The Olympic Games marks the culmination of years of hard work for the competitors, all in preparation for a singular opportunity to win a gold medal.

Of course there isn’t a “leadership” event in the Olympics, but if there were, I think there are four essential traits, qualities, or characteristics that leaders would need to master in order to have a shot at the gold.
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10 Awful Truths Every Leader Needs to Know  

10 Awful Truths Every Leader Needs to Know   | New Leadership | Scoop.it
10 counter-intuitive truths that leaders need to know in order to successfully meet today's challenges and create strong, sustainable organizations.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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How to be an inspirational super leader

How to be an inspirational super leader | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Jean Gamester, leadership guru and district director of Toastmasters International, gives advice from the best business books on how to be an inspirational Super Leader
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The Value of Positive Disruptive Leadership  

The Value of Positive Disruptive Leadership   | New Leadership | Scoop.it
“Increasing globalization, widespread technological innovation and pressure on business to customize products and services have created an international business environment that would be unrecognizable to the manager of fifteen years ago.”

While the above comment could very easily apply to the current corporate world reality, this is in fact a 1995 description of the challenges facing leadership outlined in a government-funded special report titled Enterprising Nation: Renewing Australia’s Managers to Meet the Challenges of the Asia–Pacific Century. This report was a landmark management and leadership development blueprint that became widely known as The Karpin Report.
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The Test Every Great Leader Must Pass - Lolly Daskal | Leadership

The Test Every Great Leader Must Pass - Lolly Daskal | Leadership | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Are you a good leader? A great leader? How can you even know? You can take the test........ Most leaders are too busy to spend much time reflecting on that

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Great Leaders Aren’t Superheroes: They Create Them

Great Leaders Aren’t Superheroes: They Create Them | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Great leaders can indeed have a massive impact on their organizations and people. Like true superheroes, they can turn a bigger purpose into reality, they never give up, show courage, have the ability to face fears and apply a strong cultural code of conduct. Some are even so powerful that the mere survival of their companies depends on them. When Steve Jobs left Apple in 1985, the company went into decline and he had to return to save it. Also, Howard Schultz and Michael Dell took up similar rescuing come-back roles years after having left Starbucks and Dell, respectively.

However, the fact that humans so badly want to believe in superheroes all too often turns into a liability in business, with many leaders mistaking fame for infallibility. Here is why the days of leaders acting as superheroes are largely over.

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Is Your Leadership Power Helping or Hurting?

Is Your Leadership Power Helping or Hurting? | New Leadership | Scoop.it

If you are a manager, supervisor, or an executive at any level, I think you’ll find the latest research on leadership power relevant to your job, the people you lead, and the results you seek.

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What does a brain-savvy leader look like?

What does a brain-savvy leader look like? | New Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the most obvious applications of neuroscience is in the leadership of a business. This article pulls together the elements that make a leader successful. We talk about these elements through the lens of what we know about how the brain functions.

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We believe and our research bears out that understanding how the brain works is one way of helping leaders become more effective. We call this brain-savvy leading.

There are a number of elements which make up this type of leading. Some are about how leaders interact with their people, both their followers and their peers, while other elements are about how leaders understand themselves.

Via David Hain, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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David Hain's curator insight, July 23, 2:32 AM

How much do you know about neuroscience? It could improve your leadership. A brief 101 here!

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Leader v manager: Who’s the boss?

Leader v manager: Who’s the boss? | New Leadership | Scoop.it
The age old question of what defines a manager compared to a leader has always been a source of debate. Here, Jo Owen thinks he has the answer…
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How to Cope With Leadership in a New Company

How to Cope With Leadership in a New Company | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Congratulations! You got a leadership position at a new company! You must be so proud? So, what is your first plan? Are you going to shake everything up?

Via The People Development Network
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Be a Transformational Leader!  

Be a Transformational Leader!   | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Use this infographic to learn how to become a Transformational Leader, and be a leader who inspires trust and loyalty in other people.
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Three Questions to a More Enlightened Business

Three Questions to a More Enlightened Business | New Leadership | Scoop.it
By regularly “checking-in” with employees, leaders create emotionally sound companies able to help drive organisational change.
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The 4 Decision Styles: When to Involve Others in Decisions | Jesse Lyn Stoner

The 4 Decision Styles: When to Involve Others in Decisions | Jesse Lyn Stoner | New Leadership | Scoop.it

You face countless decisions each day and must determine which to make on your own and when to involve others. This is true no matter what your role or level, whether you are CEO, a project leader, or a team member. How do you know when to involve others in decisions?


Most people are guided by personal preference. Some people are decisive by nature or action-oriented. They would rather not to get bogged down by involving others if they can avoid it. Others are collaborative by nature and prefer dialogue and consensus decision-making.

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Do You Know What Your People Value?

Do You Know What Your People Value? | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Last week I took to social media to ask the question “What do you value most about your company and your leader?” It wasn’t a large sample, but big enough to get some diversity of thought. Take a look at some of the responses I got back.  

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Why Empathy Makes for Stronger Organisations

Why Empathy Makes for Stronger Organisations | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Executives’ ability to see themselves from the outside and others from the inside, plays an important role in effective team formation
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5 Ways to Grow Your Employees  

5 Ways to Grow Your Employees   | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Employing great talent for your business is a skill and certainly, not one that’s developed overnight, but once you’ve hired them it can feel like you’ve hit the jackpot. The next step is making sure the talent you have wants to stay, and to do that, you need to grow your employees.

Millennials are known for their love of job hopping (a LinkedIn survey found that 45% of employees are planning on staying with their current employer for two years of less) and not necessarily because they don’t enjoy the role they’re in – it’s the opportunity to develop that often entices them in.

So how can you help to prevent great talent from leaving? Give them the opportunities to develop. An investment in an employee it ultimately an investment in your business, so take note of these strategies to grow your employees.

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How to Watch Out for Blind Spots in Your Leadership 

How to Watch Out for Blind Spots in Your Leadership  | New Leadership | Scoop.it

It’s the tricky thing about blind spots: Everybody has them, but often we don’t even know they exist until they cause a problem. 


All of us have blind spots, and most of us at some point have made a bad decision because of them. But when a leader has a blind spot, the repercussions spread to include the entire organization—and sometimes even its stakeholders and customers.

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Leader Storytelling: The Pivotal Stories You Should Be Able to Tell

Leader Storytelling: The Pivotal Stories You Should Be Able to Tell | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Since starting his career as a U.S. Marine, Don Faul has led operations at Facebook, Pinterest and now Athos. Here are the stories he tells to rally big teams to do their best work.

Via Karen Dietz, Os Ishmael, malek, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 25, 1:34 PM

This article is long -- but both good. The author interviews Facebook VP of Online Operations, Dan Faul where Faul expresses his conviction about the necessity  of great storytelling for leaders.

 

Not only does this article talk about what makes a great story, but it actually discusses 3 pivotal stories every leader needs to tell -- including a personal failure story.

 

Faul makes lots of great points, and shares both the why and the how storytelling has made such a huge difference for him. Right on!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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How to Bypass Frustration and Lead with Patience

How to Bypass Frustration and Lead with Patience | New Leadership | Scoop.it

As a leader, you’ve probably encountered situations that can be frustrating. Perhaps your direct report did something wrong or you had too much on your plate. How did you deal with that situation?

I was recently asked at a gathering of friends how I remained so positive. Did I have a secret daily ritual of beating up a punching bag? Did I release my stress by screaming at a stuffed animal? I said no, but I sometimes rely on my hobbies of movies and video games every once in a while when I want to let off some steam.

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Disrupting Power

Disrupting Power | New Leadership | Scoop.it
I am writing today about power, about different forms of power, and the structures that it is held within. This relates to a number of strands of work that I'm exploring at the moment, from resilience, to Social Leadership, and the limits of hierarchy. In this piece, I'm going to consider three forms of power:…

Via Marta Torán, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Marta Torán's curator insight, July 23, 4:59 AM
El poder en la Era Social. Julian Stodd revisa las nuevas maneras de relacionarnos.
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Fellow View: What's your why?

Fellow View: What's your why? | New Leadership | Scoop.it

In her blog, Institute of Leadership and Management Fellow Penny Sophocleous discusses why, as a leader, it is important to have a belief system that motivates you

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The Best Leaders Know These 6 Tricks to Being More Approachable

The Best Leaders Know These 6 Tricks to Being More Approachable | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Not being approachable could be your biggest leadership blind spot

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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donhornsby's curator insight, July 25, 9:30 AM
(From the article): If you're struggling with approachability because of persistent shyness or fear of appearing vulnerable, you can still overcome the hurdle breaking the practices down into smaller steps and setting incremental goals for yourself that include practicing with people outside of work--on a plane, in line at the store, or in your neighborhood. For example, a micro-step for number 1 might be making the first move with one person at one event. The easiest way to do this is to scan the room for anyone else who is standing alone. Being approachable doesn't mean changing your core personality, it's simply a way to ensure that more people have access to you and what you have to offer.

 Becoming more approachable will have numerous benefits in your career. You'll gain access to more information faster and grow your network by being known as someone who is interesting and engaging. Awareness of the importance of being approachable is a starting point. Then, these six tips can help you build that awareness and the skills you need to sustain and invite future conversations around the office.
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Are You Over-Functioning in Your Leadership Role?

Are You Over-Functioning in Your Leadership Role? | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Most people want to work for a caring boss. Not only is it more enjoyable, it’s good for your health, according to research by Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer. Compassion is certainly a hallmark of leadership effectiveness. But can a leader care too much? Shelley Row, a professional engineer and former transportation executive believes that caring for one’s employees, while admirable, does have its drawbacks. It can stunt your team members’ professional and personal growth. Moreover, misplaced concern and worry can overload leaders.

Row’s book, Think Less, Live More: Lessons from a Recovering Over-Thinker explores the ways in which leaders might “over-function,” meaning they assume more control or responsibility over a situation than is required. Over-functioning and micromanagement share a common element: the refusal to release control. Strangely enough, the act of “caring”, when taken too far, is a control issue. For example, when a leader avoids making difficult decisions because he is concerned about an employee’s reaction, he has crossed the line from compassion into over-functioning. It’s as if the leader has assumed responsibility for an employee’s reaction to the situation, thereby transferring who “owns” (or controls) the emotion from the employee to the manager.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, July 22, 1:00 AM

It seems leaders can care too much? Do you agree? how do you find the balance?