New Leadership
Follow
Find
12.9K views | +23 today
 
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Surviving Leadership Chaos
onto New Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Secret Ingredient of Brilliant Leaders and Managers

The Secret Ingredient of Brilliant Leaders and Managers | New Leadership | Scoop.it

I have only come across a handful of brilliant leaders and managers in my working career.

 

The ingredient these people shared was, they were intrinsically drawn to “doing the right thing”. The “right thing” for these leaders and managers wasn’t always popular. The act of choosing for them was sometimes personally agonising, but they still made those decisions.

 

When questioned, many leaders and managers know what “doing the right thing” is, but quite often,  mysteriously,  they just don’t make that decision.  Thus, opportunities are lost, credibility is questioned and results are lower than expected.


Via donhornsby
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, December 29, 2012 4:40 PM

(From the Article): When leaders and managers don’t understand how to manage difference whether it is psychological, cultural, or an equality issue, or are more concerned about speedy outcomes at the expense of the people they employ, then there is a danger unhelpful decisions will be made.

Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, December 30, 2012 4:58 AM

Intuition

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.comwww.harvardtrends.com

From around the web

New Leadership
The Changing Face of Modern Leadership
Curated by Roger Francis
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

45 Questions Every Leader Should Answer

45 Questions Every Leader Should Answer | New Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the best ways to become a better leader is to view your organization in a new light. Here are 45 questions every leader should answer.

Via donhornsby
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 7:30 AM

A great list of the important questions that every leader should consider and answer. Which one's are you considering today?

 

(From the article): 

Are we leading or just managing?Do we offer our people more than a paycheck?Are we challenging the status quo?How much time do we spend thinking versus doing?How much do we say, “We should have” when we truly could have?Is there a better way?
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Servant Leadership: It Builds Great Teams and Gets Great Results

Servant Leadership: It Builds Great Teams and Gets Great Results | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Even though it’s been around as a concept for nearly 50 years — and in reality much longer, depending on how you define it — servant leadership has been growing in prominence

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Resolving the Conflict Between “Woman” and “Leader”

Resolving the Conflict Between “Woman” and “Leader” | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Women may face more barriers to leadership if there is a perceived conflict between their professional role and their gender. Organisations must detect any gender bias and promote a positive view of women leaders

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from 21st Century Leadership
Scoop.it!

10 Core Competencies of Servant Leadership

Servant-Leaders strive to become the best leaders possible each and every day. To do so means that they follow and are empowered by key characteristics that build a service-oriented consciousness (mind-set). Much of the research on servant leadership discuss the characteristics of a servant leader. Some researchers say servant leadership is seen as vision, influence, credibility, and trust. Others include emotional healing, creating value for the community, conceptual skills, empowering, helping subordinates grow and succeed, putting subordinates first, behaving ethically, relationships, and servant hood as key characteristics. One of my favorite researchers, K. Patterson, added another characteristic; Agapao love. She defined it as to do goodwill for another.


Via Roy Sheneman, PhD
more...
Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, May 31, 6:43 PM
This is one of the most powerful of all leadership models. It underlies and enables all others...
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Does Your Company Have An Ego Problem? 8 Warning Signs

Does Your Company Have An Ego Problem? 8 Warning Signs | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Ego can be our greatest asset or it can be our biggest liability. It’s all about keeping it in balance.


An out of balance ego doesn’t feel dramatically different from one that is in balance, explain authors David Marcum and Steven Smith in their book, Egonomics—and that’s why it trips up so many leaders

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Leadership and Management
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Qualities That Make A Great Leader

Top 10 Qualities That Make A Great Leader | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Having a great idea, and assembling a team to bring that concept to life is the first step in creating a successful business venture.

Via Rami Kantari
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Why Special Ops Stopped Relying So Much on Top-Down Leadership

Why Special Ops Stopped Relying So Much on Top-Down Leadership | New Leadership | Scoop.it

When Fredrick Winslow Taylor designed the world’s first modern assembly line and forever changed industry, persuasion was the last thing on his mind. Taylor believed assembly line workers simply needed clear direction on how to execute prescribed tasks. His belief, which manifested in both physical design and organizational structures during the decades that followed, was that the human factor should be removed from the production equation to the greatest extent possible. Stopwatch and measuring tape in hand, Taylor designed and advocated for systems that maximized efficiency and predictability through vertical integration and top-down control. And with that, the 20th century’s great quest for bureaucratic efficiency began.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business change
Scoop.it!

The Hard Work of Soft Power

The Hard Work of Soft Power | New Leadership | Scoop.it
“Inclusive leadership starts with an intention of wanting the best for the world, not necessarily the best in the world. It is a form of leadership that looks deeply into the role of the leader as a custodian of values, character and resources,” says Kurt April, Professor of Leadership, Diversity and Inclusion at the UCT Graduate School of Business and Associate Fellow of Said Business School (University of Oxford).

April, whose research over 15 years spans a wide range of leadership issues, says that inclusive leadership seeks to encourage the input of key stakeholders, valuing their opinions and welcoming the diversity of perspectives and experiences they contribute. A far cry from the pervasive hierarchical styles of leadership of old.

Via David Hain
more...
David Hain's curator insight, May 29, 11:29 AM

How to sell change to hearts and mot just minds!

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

Difficult bosses: can neuroscience help?

Difficult bosses: can neuroscience help? | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Difficult bosses are always a challenge but usually also a learning opportunity.

Via David Hain
more...
David Hain's curator insight, May 28, 7:22 AM

What does brain science suggest you do with a narcissist boss?

Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

7 Strategies for Successfully Leading During Personal Crisis

7 Strategies for Successfully Leading During Personal Crisis | New Leadership | Scoop.it

A few weeks ago, a member of my family received a cancer diagnosis that none of us expected. Since then we’ve been on a roller coaster that is all-too familiar to far too many people. But for us, it was new. In the hours and days of dealing with the news, I knew we could be managed through a process like many before us, or we could take a more active leadership role in our patient’s care. We chose the latter.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Leadership By Virtue
Scoop.it!

Building trust as a leader (Principal)

Building trust as a leader (Principal) | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Over 50% of employees don’t trust their boss.* 5 reasons leaders seem dishonest: Pretending things are better than they are. Holding your nose in the air. Arrogant leaders sacrifice others to prote...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Denise Francis, Ines Bieler, Jaro Berce
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Wise Leadership
Scoop.it!

Why Successful Leadership Depends On Connections - Forbes

Why Successful Leadership Depends On Connections - Forbes | New Leadership | Scoop.it
One of the criticisms frequently levelled at senior executives is that they prefer doing deals to actually running businesses.

Via Roy Sheneman, PhD, Wise Leader™
more...
Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, May 26, 9:00 AM

Who you know that can help you and you can help is the key to long term development.

Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

How to Find Next-Generation Leaders

How to Find Next-Generation Leaders | New Leadership | Scoop.it

It’s an age-old question: What kind of people do you want to lead your company? For years, the reflexive answer has been, “experienced people.” However, "people who demonstrate learning agility" is a new contender for the top spot

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Storytelling: How to Inspire, Influence and Get Results

Storytelling: How to Inspire, Influence and Get Results | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Striving to reach your creative potential? Storytelling expert Annette Simmons explains the importance of subjective thinking and emotional intelligence

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Improvement
Scoop.it!

6 Hats Every Business Owner Must Wear

6 Hats Every Business Owner Must Wear | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
more...
Daniel Watson's curator insight, June 1, 6:50 PM


Owning a business, puts one in a position where a multiplicity of roles needs to be accommodated, until such a time as the business is large enough and profitable enough, to employ qualified professionals in key areas. Often businesses fail because the business owners do not know, or do not understand, the key hats they must continually wear as they grow their businesses. This article identifies each of these key hats and then shares why each is critical to a business wanting to succeed.

Kathleen Nestor's curator insight, June 1, 11:56 PM

You Can Be A Great Leader And A Terrible Boss... Or You Can Be A Great Boss And A Terrible Leader... Check Out This Article..

Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Change Leaders Focus on Feelings

Change Leaders Focus on Feelings | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Changing people’s minds and behaviors is hard. Have you ever, in a rational way, successfully changed the attitude of a psychopathic team member who hasn’t contributed anything useful since 1972? I thought so. To assume that change in organizations can be rational is, in itself, irrational

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Wise Leadership
Scoop.it!

7 Things the Best Leaders Never Fail to Do

7 Things the Best Leaders Never Fail to Do | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Want to rise to the top? Take this advice distilled from 24 women who've done it.

Via Bobby Dillard, Wise Leader™
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Your Success as a Leader Depends on This One Thing

Your Success as a Leader Depends on This One Thing | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Leadership is a complex endeavor, but it doesn’t have to be complicated.


We tend to make things more complicated than they need to be and that’s definitely true in the field of leadership. To prove my point, go to Amazon.com and search their book listings for the word “leadership” and see how many returns you get (but wait until you finish reading this article!). What did you find? It was 138,611 as of the writing of this post.


Browsing the titles of some popular best-sellers would lead you to believe that in order to be a successful leader you just need to find the magical keys, take the right steps, follow the proper laws, figure out the dysfunctions, embrace the challenge, ascend the levels, look within yourself, look outside yourself, form a tribe, develop the right habits, know the rules, break the rules, be obsessed, learn the new science, or discover the ancient wisdom. Did I say we like to over-complicate things?

more...
Jaro Berce's comment, May 31, 5:07 AM
I've been writing about TRUST-Leadership-Martial arts @: http://leadershipbyvirtue.blogspot.com/2014/02/leadership-and-trust.html
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

"This Is What Real Leaders Do"

Over the past few weeks, I’ve had several fascinating discussions with leaders from different organizations and industries about the various challenges they’re grappling with within their workplace.

For some of these leaders, the major issue they face is how to improve employee engagement levels within their division.

For another group, the main challenge they want to address is how to make emotional intelligence a key foundation stone in their leadership within an organization whose senior leaders don’t see or understand the value of such measures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

"Building Emotional Competencies In Our Leadership"

Over the past decade or so, there have been numerous studies and books that have helped us to better appreciate the emotional nature of successful leadership, a fact that has helped to bring about a transformation in leadership attitudes from the old command-and-control approach to one that’s more outward-focused and collaborative.

Unfortunately, while we’ve become more aware about the importance of emotional intelligence in today’s leadership, the truth is many of us continue to grapple with this issue and in the past few years, it has only become worse thanks to the changing realities of leading in today’s faster-paced, 24/7 work environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

How the Navy SEALs Train for Leadership Excellence

How the Navy SEALs Train for Leadership Excellence | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Almost every world-class, high-performance organization takes training and education seriously. But Navy SEALs go uncomfortably beyond. They’re obsessive and obsessed. They are arguably the best in the world at what they do. Their dedication to relentless training and intensive preparation, however, is utterly alien to the overwhelming majority of businesses and professional enterprises worldwide. That’s important, not because I think MBAs should be more like SEALS—I don’t—but because real-world excellence requires more than commitment to educational achievement.

As an educator, I fear world-class business schools and high-performance businesses overinvest in “education” and dramatically underinvest in “training.” Human capital champions in higher education and industry typically prize knowledge over skills. Crassly put, leaders and managers get knowledge and education while training and skills go to those who do the work. That business bias is both dangerous and counterproductive. The SEALS can’t afford it. “Under pressure,” according to SEAL lore, “you don’t rise to the occasion, you sink to the level of your training. That’s why we train so hard.” When I see just how difficult and challenging it is for so many smart and talented organizations to innovate and adapt under pressure, I see people who are overeducated and undertrained. That scares me.

Via David Hain
more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 29, 12:00 PM

While I totally believe there are elements of Seal training that can be applied to business, however the big difference is, that in business our lives are not directly and physically at risk so we tend to minimize the role. It boils down to attitude.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, May 30, 8:40 AM

Seal Motto: "You rise to the level of your training "

John Michel's curator insight, Today, 8:24 AM

If your organization cares about innovation or transforming customer service or being data-driven, how do you lead by example? In Laszlo Bock’s otherwise superb Google-based book on performance analytics—Work Rules!—the phrase “lead by example” is nowhere to be found. That’s both a pity and opportunity missed because, as Webb stresses, leading by example is what truly empowers small teams and teamwork.

Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

Bridging the Trust Chasm

Bridging the Trust Chasm | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Whoosh and it’s gone! Trust can evaporate in an instant and organisations are notoriously poor at recovering it. But it doesn’t have to be this way.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

10 Steps for Engaged Leadership

10 Steps for Engaged Leadership | New Leadership | Scoop.it
David Zinger shares how organizations can fuse leadership and engagement to drive productivity and organizational success.

Via Anne Leong, Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Tony Park's curator insight, May 29, 11:21 PM

Move from known to unknown

Tony

Scooped by Roger Francis
Scoop.it!

10 Best Kept Secrets on Building a Business That Lasts

10 Best Kept Secrets on Building a Business That Lasts | New Leadership | Scoop.it

When in 1994 Jim Collins and Jerry I. Porras wrote their business best seller ‘Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies’, the world was a very different place to what it is now. More than 20 years later, it turns out organizations cannot be ‘built’ to last by simply adhering to a set of fixed best practices; instead they should ‘build’ to last by continuously redefining practices in response to the rapidly changing context around them. Today’s business context is characterized by VUCA, an acronym derived from the military world: Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity. The VUCA environment translates into complete industries being turned around or swept away in the blink of an eye, the average corporate lifespan being shortened dramatically and the rules of success being altered by the day.


Here are 10 best kept secrets on how to build today to last beyond tomorrow.

more...
No comment yet.