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Rescooped by Tom Schueneman from Climate & Clean Air Watch
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Global oil glut set to last at least until mid-2017 – IEA ("bad news for clean air and renewables")

Global oil glut set to last at least until mid-2017 – IEA ("bad news for clean air and renewables") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

'Demand growth is slowing and supply is rising,' explains the International Energy Agency in its monthly report.

A global oil glut that has hurt producers but means cheaper pump prices for consumers looks set to go on at least 6 months longer than previously thought, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said Tuesday, September 13. 

The IEA said demand growth was slowing while supply was rising, meaning the glut was now due to linger "at least through the first half of next year."  

The Paris-based organization had earlier seen the oil oversupply disappearing in the latter part of 2016. 

The timing of the world oil market's return to balance is "the big question", the IEA said in its monthly report, adding that current prices – above $45 – would suggest supply falling and strong demand growth. 

"However, the opposite now seems to be happening," it said. "Demand growth is slowing and supply is rising." 

The trend may fuel speculation of a possible production freeze – aimed at supporting prices – being agreed between OPEC and non-OPEC member Russia at a meeting in Algeria later this month. 

China and India, which had been key drivers recently of demand growth, are "wobbling," it said, while a slowdown in the US and economic concerns in developing countries have also contributed to the surprise development. 

Global oil demand is now expected to grow by 1.3 million barrels per day (mb/d) in 2016, to 96.1 mb/d, from its original forecast of 1.4 mb/d growth. 

The IEA also trimmed its demand growth forecast for 2017 by 200,000 barrels per day, to 97.3 mb/d.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, September 14, 10:32 PM
Good or Bad News? - Oil prices will remain low in 2017. More air pollution?
"The IEA data is also suggesting that an OPEC 'freeze' will not be enough to rebalance the market in 2017," he said in a note to investors.
I WONDER WHY PHIL GAS PRICES GO UP!!!???

"The IEA, which advises oil consuming nations on energy issues, said its latest data indicated that the "supply-demand dynamic may not change significantly in the coming months." 
"As a result, supply will continue to outpace demand at least through the first half of next year," it said. 
"As for the market's return to balance – it looks like we may have to wait a while longer," it added. 
"As a result of the stubborn supply glut, producers have been hurt by a plunge in crude prices from around $100 in mid-2014 to 13-year lows of below $30 at the start of this year."
Rescooped by Tom Schueneman from Climate & Clean Air Watch
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Short Answers to Hard Questions About Clean Coal Technology ("still unreachable & uneconomical")

Short Answers to Hard Questions About Clean Coal Technology ("still unreachable & uneconomical") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

A primer on carbon capture and storage, and why it has an uncertain future as a force for fighting climate change.

Technology holds the promise of enabling coal power plants, which produce much of the world’s electricity, to run more cleanly, emitting far less of the pollution that causes climate change. But these projects have been difficult to make a reality because they are complicated and expensive. Here is a quick primer.

... Since the early 2000s, there has been a wave of optimism that this technology could play a vital role in slowing climate change by cleaning up some of the biggest emitters of carbon pollution. Now there is significant skepticism that the technology can be scaled up affordably, reliably and soon enough to make a difference.

​How is the CO2 captured? 

A power plant can trap carbon dioxide in one of three ways. After combustion, the carbon dioxide is captured from the exhaust of a power plant by absorbing it in a liquid, which is later heated to release the gas for storage. CO2 can also be captured before combustion. In this case, a controlled amount of oxygen is used to turn coal or natural gas into “syngas,” a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Before it is burned to generate power, the syngas is treated with steam, producing carbon dioxide. A third method involves burning fossil fuels in oxygen. That results in an exhaust stream of water vapor and CO2, which are then separated by cooling and compressing the gas stream.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 10, 11:50 AM
Clean coal is still a THEORY! Even if it is reached, it is not economical.

"Coal plants that capture carbon are expensive partly because they are so complex. As the New York Times reporter Henry Fountain explained, “removing carbon dioxide from the swirl of gases unleashed at a power plant is challenging, akin to plucking just a few colored Ping-Pong balls out of the air from a swarm of mostly white ones.” That price rises further because capturing and compressing the carbon requires so much energy, sometimes sapping more than 20 percent of the electricity that the plant is supposed to produce for consumers."
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Seven climate records set so far in 2016 ("we can no longer ignore the obvious warming of planet")

Seven climate records set so far in 2016 ("we can no longer ignore the obvious warming of planet") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

From soaring temperatures in Alaska and India to Arctic sea ice melting and CO2 concentrations rising, this year is smashing records around the world

1) Arctic sea ice is melting at a rate that by September could see it beat the record low set in 2012. The maximum extent of sea ice in winter was at a record low, and the extent in May was the lowest for that month ever, by more than 500,000 sq km.

2) Every month this year has been the hottest on record globally for that month. May, data published this week by Nasa revealed, was no exception. Nasa’s dataset, one of three main global surface temperature records, shows February recorded the highest anomaly against long term average temperatures.

3) India recorded its hottest day ever on 19 May. The mercury in Phalodi, in the desert state of Rajasthan, rose to 51C, as a nationwide drought that has affected more than 300 million people marched on, leaving armed guards at dams, and reservoirs well below their usual levels.

4) Alaska, along with the rest of the Arctic, has experienced record-breaking heat. Spring was the warmest on record in the state, with an average temperature of 0C, and the average year-to-date temperature has been 5.5C above the long term average.

5) Concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have been breaking records every year for decades, but the size of the margin by which the record is forecast to break the annual record in 2016 is striking and itself a record. The increase for 2016 is expected to be 3.1 parts per million, up from an annual average of 2.1.

6) Australia, no stranger to record-breaking heat, just clocked up its hottest autumn yet.

7) The Great Barrier Reef, a natural wonder and world heritage site, experienced its worst ever coral bleaching event, as a blob of warm water made its way around the world.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 24, 12:28 AM
From soaring temperatures in Alaska and India to Arctic sea ice melting and CO2 concentrations rising, this year is smashing records around the world.
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Is this the most important chart in global energy? ("can't dispute graph of declining cost of solar")

Is this the most important chart in global energy? ("can't dispute graph of declining cost of solar") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

“It describes a pattern so consistent, and so powerful, that industries set their clocks by it."

At first glance, the progress made is significant, but look a little closer and it’s even more incredible. The chart is on a logarithmic scale, emphasizing the progress made towards making solar power more affordable. 

As the bubble on the chart highlights, the fall in module costs has been dramatic. For every doubling in the number of solar panels, costs fall by 26%. This cost is known as solar’s ‘learning rate’. 

Bloomberg offers a simple explanation for this trend. Efficiency increases and costs fall as time progresses because solar is a technology, not a fuel. As they emphasize: “This is the formula that’s driving the energy revolution.”

The benefits are already being seen across the world. Consider Morocco’s giant new solar power plant – the Noor-Ouarzazate complex, which is set to power over a million homes. Partly funded with a loan from the World Bank, the scale of the project is a key indication of the progress in solar infrastructure. 

Solar isn’t only for places with year-round sun either. Germany has the capacity to generate over a third of its electricity from solar – this in a country hardly noted for endless, sun-filled days.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 20, 2:19 AM
Don't be the last to know.

"Increasing use of solar also reduces the use of coal and gas power plants. As they’re used less, costs increase. This will make renewables seem ever more attractive. 
"It’s fair to say that solar looks set to stay – and the best thing is, the further the technology advances, the cheaper it gets."
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Infographic: Affordable Rooftop Solar in the United States

Infographic: Affordable Rooftop Solar in the United States | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
“By 2017, more than half of U.S. states could have rooftop solar that's as cheap as local electricity rates.”
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Cities and People and Urbanism and Planning | Sustainable Cities Collective

Cities and People and Urbanism and Planning | Sustainable Cities Collective | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
For all the buzz that tactical urbanism has received in the past several years, there’s still a lack of public consensus about the movement’s exact meaning, impact, and potential for change.

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Rescooped by Tom Schueneman from Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good)
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Renewable energy sector to generate $160 billion business in five years: Economic Survey

Renewable energy sector to generate $160 billion business in five years: Economic Survey | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI: Positioning India as a responsible nation committed to sustainable development, the Economic Survey 2014-15 has said the Indian clean energy sector is likely to generate business...

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Governor Wants To Wean Utilities Off Coal ("the citizens of Washington want to be coal-free")

Governor Wants To Wean Utilities Off Coal ("the citizens of Washington want to be coal-free") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
SEATTLE (AP) — With an abundant supply of hydroelectric power, Washington state currently gets less than 14 percent of its electricity from coal.

Gov. Jay Inslee wants to take that down to zero over time....

Saying the state has a moral responsibility to act on climate change, Inslee signed an executive order last month directing state agencies to negotiate with utilities to phase out electricity produced from coal.

"It's not a trivial activity by any means, but I think it can be done," said Tony Usibelli, director of Washington's energy office, on eliminating coal-fired electricity from the state's fuel mix.

The state's only coal-fired power plant, the TransAlta facility in Centralia, is slated to shut down by 2025. Most of the state's coal-fired electricity, or coal by wire, is imported from the Colstrip power plant in eastern Montana and the Jim Bridger plant in Wyoming.

One elected official in Montana recently criticized Inslee's proposal as job-killing, while environmentalists cheered it as a big step toward making Washington coal-free.

... "We're going to look at the data, look at the information, look at modeling," Danner said. "But utilities themselves are aware of what their customers want. The people in Washington want to be coal-free."


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, May 25, 2014 1:47 AM

Why not ask the people what they want re their source of power? In this state, the voice of the people is clear.

"We're going to look at the data, look at the information, look at modeling," Danner said. "But utilities themselves are aware of what their customers want. The people in Washington want to be coal-free."

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Renewables Account for 37 Percent of All New Electrical Generating Capacity in 2013

Renewables Account for 37 Percent of All New Electrical Generating Capacity in 2013 | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
New electrical generating capacity in 2013 According to the just-released Energy Infrastructure Update report from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Office of Energy Projects, 37 percent of all new U.S.
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As Uses of Biochar Expand, Climate Benefits Still Uncertain by Mark Hertsgaard: Yale Environment 360

As Uses of Biochar Expand, Climate Benefits Still Uncertain by Mark Hertsgaard: Yale Environment 360 | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
Research shows that biochar made from plant fodder and even chicken manure can be used to scrub mercury from power plant emissions and clean up polluted soil.
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RENEWABLES: Green energy revolution? - Xperedon Charity News

RENEWABLES: Green energy revolution? - Xperedon Charity News | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
RENEWABLES: Green energy revolution? Xperedon Charity News Non-profit campaigners calling for investment in green energy as both an economic and environmental benefit have received a boost following the record-breaking renewable energy output...
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Parkets and Urban Spaces | Sustainable Cities Collective

Parkets and Urban Spaces | Sustainable Cities Collective | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
“ Parklets are tiny parks carved out of sections of streets previously reserved for car parking.”
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Bio-waste to biofuel | PLANT West print issue | Canadian Manufacturing

Bio-waste to biofuel | PLANT West print issue | Canadian Manufacturing | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
An innovative renewable catalytic process will provide cleaner fuel to for the transportation sector.
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France to pave 1000km of roads with solar panels ("imagine driving directly on top of solar panels")

France to pave 1000km of roads with solar panels ("imagine driving directly on top of solar panels") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

Over the next five years, France will install some 621 miles (1,000km) of solar roadway using Colas' Wattway solar pavement.

Solar freakin' roadways! No, this is not the crowdfunded solar road project that blew up the internet a few years ago, but is a collaboration between Colas, a transport infrastructure company, and INES (France's National Institute for Solar Energy), and sanctioned by France's Agency of Environment and Energy Management, which promises to bring solar power to hundreds of miles of roads in the country over the next five years. 

One major difference between this solar freakin' roadway and that other solar freakin' roadway is that the new Wattway system doesn't replace the road itself or require removal of road surfaces, but instead is designed to be glued onto the top of existing pavement. The Wattway system is also built in layers of materials "that ensure resistance and tire grip," and is just 7 mm thick, which is radically different from that other design that uses thick glass panels (and which is also claimed to include LED lights and 'smart' technology, which increases the complexity and cost of the moose-friendly solar tiles).

According to Colas, the material is strong enough to stand up to regular traffic, even heavy trucks, and 20 m² of Wattway panels is said to provide enough electricity to power a single average home in France, with a 1-kilometer stretch of Wattway road able to "provide the electricity to power public lighting in a city of 5,000 inhabitants."


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 15, 2:41 AM
1000 km of solar-panel paved roads!!! This is revolutionary! One advantage will be the free cost of land, since it is on top of the public road.

"One major difference between this solar freakin' roadway and that other solar freakin' roadway is that the new Wattway system doesn't replace the road itself or require removal of road surfaces, but instead is designed to be glued onto the top of existing pavement. The Wattway system is also built in layers of materials "that ensure resistance and tire grip," and is just 7 mm thick ..."
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Sweden Opens World's First Electric Highway ("another step closer to zero-emission transport")

Sweden Opens World's First Electric Highway ("another step closer to zero-emission transport") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

A 22 kilometer stretch of the E16 road in Sweden is fitted with power lines overhead, developed by Siemens, providing electricity to hybrid trucks.

A 22 kilometer (or roughly 13 miles) stretch of the E16 road—which connects Oslo, Norway, to Gävle, Sweden—is fitted with power lines overhead, developed by Siemens, providing electricity to hybrid trucks. The system works like a tram system. A current collector on the trucks will transfer energy from the power lines to the trucks’ hybrid electric motors, Sputnik News reported. The electric lines help trucks operate longer between recharges. 

“Electric roads will bring us one step closer to fossil fuel-free transports, and has the potential to achieve zero carbon dioxide emissions,” Lena Erixon, director general of transport authority Trafikverket, said. “This is one way of developing environmentally smart transports in the existing road network. It could be a good supplement to todays road and rail network.”

When the trucks, provided by Scania, are not on the electric stretch of road, they will operate as hybrid vehicles running on biofuel. Electric-powered trucks are expected to cut 80 to 90 percent of fossil fuel emissions. The opening of this stretch of road is another step toward Sweden’s goal of operating a fossil fuel-free fleet by 2030, Inhabitat reported. 

“Electric roads are one more piece of the puzzle in the transport system of the future, especially for making the heavy transport section fossil fuel-free over the long term,” Erik Brandsma, director general of the Swedish Energy Agency, said. “This project also shows the importance of all the actors in the field cooperating.”


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 29, 11:45 PM
Another novel approach to emission-free transport, but I wonder if this is practical for the Philippines.

"The system works like a tram system. A current collector on the trucks will transfer energy from the power lines to the trucks’ hybrid electric motors, Sputnik News reported. The electric lines help trucks operate longer between recharges.
“Electric roads will bring us one step closer to fossil fuel-free transports, and has the potential to achieve zero carbon dioxide emissions,” Lena Erixon, director general of transport authority Trafikverket, said. “This is one way of developing environmentally smart transports in the existing road network. It could be a good supplement to todays road and rail network.”
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All new cars in Germany must be emissions-free after 2030 ("bold move for clean air starting w/ cars")

All new cars in Germany must be emissions-free after 2030 ("bold move for clean air starting w/ cars") | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it

A senior government official says Germany will only register electric, emissions-free cars after 2030.

Many European nations are working to reduce carbon emissions, through a combination of initiatives related to boosting renewable energy production and curbing emissions from transportation. Now, Germany is taking a stand to cut back on emissions produced on its roadways, with a declaration that all new cars registered in the country will have to meet a zero-emissions requirement by 2030. This new rule is part of Germany’s broader goal to slash up to 95 percent of carbon dioxide emissions by 2050.

Deputy Economy Minister Rainer Baake thinks it’s high time that Germany gets serious about reducing emissions from transportation. “Fact is, there’s been no reduction at all in CO2 emissions by transport since 1990,” he said. “We don’t have any answers to cut truck emissions right now but we do have answers for cars.” The emissions-free requirement will help, but Germany’s government is making it a little easier to achieve with a previously announced cash incentive program to encourage sales of electric cars. The program translates into $4,500 on purchases of all-electric cars and $3,400 on hybrid vehicles, totaling a whopping $1.1 billion nationwide.

The Environment Ministry estimates the incentive program would help put 500,000 more electric cars on the road by 2020 which is, incidentally, the self-imposed deadline for cutting the nation’s emissions by 40 percent. Currently, there are just 130,000 hybrids and 25,000 full-electric cars registered in Germany (as of January 2016) and some 30 million gasoline cars and 14.5 million diesels. All things considered, boosting electric car sales may help put a dent in the nation’s transportation emissions, but Germany has a long road ahead to its 2050 goal.“Fact is, there’s been no reduction at all in CO2 emissions by transport since 1990,” he said. “We don’t have any answers to cut truck emissions right now but we do have answers for cars.” The emissions-free requirement will help, but Germany’s government is making it a little easier to achieve with a previously announced cash incentive program to encourage sales of electric cars.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 21, 10:28 PM
The fight for clean air starts with political will.

“Fact is, there’s been no reduction at all in CO2 emissions by transport since 1990,” he said. “We don’t have any answers to cut truck emissions right now but we do have answers for cars.” The emissions-free requirement will help, but Germany’s government is making it a little easier to achieve with a previously announced cash incentive program to encourage sales of electric cars.
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How we live now: inside the revolution in urban living

How we live now: inside the revolution in urban living | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
How we live now: inside the revolution in urban living

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China's on track for the biggest reduction in coal use ever recorded

China's on track for the biggest reduction in coal use ever recorded | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
This could be huge.
Tom Schueneman's insight:

Though China still burns and enormous amount of coal, this is movement in the right direction

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Opposition to Science Invites a Climate Catastrophe

Opposition to Science Invites a Climate Catastrophe | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
The growing opposition to science and a culture of intellectualism in America and elsewhere bodes poorly for a sustainable future
Tom Schueneman's insight:

The growing culture of anti-intellectualism in America and elsewhere bodes poorly for a sustainable future

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Angry Bear » Oil price implications

Gail Tverberg offers her view on possible ramifications of the severe drop in prices for oil and  debt financed growth:

 

There are really two different problems that a person can be concerned about:

Peak oil: the possibility that oil prices will rise, and because of this production will fall in a rounded curve. Substitutes that are possible because of high prices will perhaps take over.Debt related collapse: oil limits will play out in a very different way than most have imagined, through lower oil prices as limits to growth in debt are reached, and thus a collapse in oil “demand” (really affordability). The collapse in production, when it comes, will be sharper and will affect the entire economy, not just oil.

In my view, a rapid drop in oil prices is likely a symptom that we are approaching a debt-related collapse–in other words, the second of these two problems. Underlying this debt-related collapse is the fact that we seem to be reaching the limits of a finite world. There is a growing mismatch between what workers in oil importing countries can afford, and the rising real costs of extraction, including associated governmental costs. This has been covered up to date by rising debt, but at some point, it will not be possible to keep increasing the debt sufficiently.




There is of course insurance by the FDIC and the PBGC, but the actual funding for these two insurance programs is tiny in relationship to the kind of risk that would occur if there were widespread debt defaults and derivative defaults affecting many banks and many pension plans at once. While depositors and pension holders might try to collect this insurance, there wouldn’t be enough money to actually cover these demands. This problem would be similar to the issue that arose in Iceland in 2008. Insurance would seem to be available, but in practice, would not pay out much.

Also, I learned after writing this post that bail-ins were mandated for US banks by the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. In the language of the summary, bank depositors are “unsecured creditors,” and are thus among those to whom the burden of loss is transferred. The FDIC is not allowed to borrow extra funds, beyond bank funds, to cover this loss.


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Denmark and UAE Sign Renewables and Sustainability Pact

Denmark and UAE Sign Renewables and Sustainability Pact | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
Denmark and the UAE — two of the world's major players in clean energy — have signed a pact to collaborate on advancing renewable and sustainability developments. ...
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Urban Interventions: A Tactical Urbanism Introduction.

Urban Interventions: A Tactical Urbanism Introduction. | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
Join us to find how inexpensive, short-term urban interventions can create long-term societal change. Bottom up and top down.

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, January 19, 2014 5:38 PM

Another introduction into tactical urbanism, ground up change to our urban spaces to encourage greater community interaction and direction from 'us', the community.

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Urban Interventions: A Tactical Urbanism Introduction.

Urban Interventions: A Tactical Urbanism Introduction. | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
Join us to find how inexpensive, short-term urban interventions can create long-term societal change. Bottom up and top down.

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, January 19, 2014 5:38 PM

Another introduction into tactical urbanism, ground up change to our urban spaces to encourage greater community interaction and direction from 'us', the community.

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Germany's 'impractical dream'?

Germany's 'impractical dream'? | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
Germany's Energiewende or Energy Path is leading Europe's dominant industrial power into wholly new territory. Sober bureaucrats see a 100% renewable energy economy by 2050 as technically feasible. Chris Goodall asks - have they all gone mad?
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The Secret to Making Sustainable Cities - Jan Gehl and His 5 Birds

The Secret to Making Sustainable Cities - Jan Gehl and His 5 Birds | New Energy Economy | Scoop.it
Jan Gehl explores the concept of creating sustainable cities for people and within this article we share his 5 principles.

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Bentejui Hernández Acosta's curator insight, December 29, 2013 5:58 AM

"We must take into account the environmental, cultural, political, and social characteristics of each place to understand the problems; the differences between them are crucial to generate better cities for people."