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On (Un)organized Consumption

On (Un)organized Consumption | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

I complain about not being able to manage my streams of information. I read how internet curators, like Brainpicker, sift through so much to find interesting things -- so we don't have to.

Ally Greer's insight:

Cheri Lucas Rowlands's thoughts on the "labyrinthine-ness of the web" are extremely interesting and thought provoking.


There are so many curators who dedicate their time sifting through feed after feed, article after article, to find the best content on their subject of expertise and share it with their audience. Naturally, these curators coexist with the readers - those who have no desire to go through all of the noise and simply want the best content delivered to them. 


This pairing will be the future of information consumption. In a world where millions of pieces of content are published to the web every single day, the algorithm will slowly become obsolete and the human curator will take over.


We've given this a try with our new Read.it app, and can't wait to see how information consumption will change when the content discovery is fueled by a community of experts.


Are you a curator or a reader?

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Treathyl Fox's comment, March 19, 2013 2:37 PM
"This pairing will be the future of information consumption." I rather like the sound of that.
Treathyl Fox's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:40 PM

Pairing Scoop.It with another publishing platform, like Wordpress or Tumblr, makes for a happy marriage. 

New Age Information Consumption
With the ways we discover knowledge changing every day, what will be the future of information consumption and sharing?
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Facebook's Latest News Feed Change Aims To Reward High-Quality Content

Facebook's Latest News Feed Change Aims To Reward High-Quality Content | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it
Continuing its promise to be more transparent about how the News Feed works, Facebook has announced another tweak to how it decides what stories show up there.
Ally Greer's insight:

Even Facebook knows that people want to be provided with quality content - not necessarily just what people think is popular. Check out the new way they're trying to smarten up everyone's News Feeds.

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Paul Chaney's comment, August 24, 2013 1:29 PM
I'd love it if Facebook just let me decide what I consider "high quality" to be. I'm a better judge of what I like than the algorithm.
Ally Greer's comment, August 26, 2013 1:25 PM
Totally agree with that notion, Paul. People > Algorithms!
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The Tyranny of Most-Popular Lists

The Tyranny of Most-Popular Lists | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

"Where's the best stuff? is the question that motivates my Internet snooping."

Ally Greer's insight:

In this post for The Atlantic, Derek Thompson investigates what drives people to read online. As a writer for a popular news site, it's of interest to Thompson to find out what people are clicking on when navigating through the endless amounts of content available to them. Though it sounds like a boring study of analytics at first, his findings and references are actually super interesting.

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5 ways social media strengthens employee communication

5 ways social media strengthens employee communication | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it
What started as a phenomenon on a more personal level is now extending its reach to work and offices.
Ally Greer's insight:

Social media is being used everywhere else to share and consume information, so what's the delay on internal communications within companies? Have you ever met someone who enjoys answering emails? Me neither.


Some may view communication with coworkers via social networks as blurring the line between personal and professional - what they don't yet know is that there are networks that exist specifically for this purpose! Yammer, BranchOut, and even Google Plus are great places to host online communities of coworkers and enhance the professional experience by bringing employees together and making them more comfortable and happier in the workplace.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 30, 2013 1:42 PM

How employee communications can be enhanced by social media.

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There's no point in knowledge if you don't share it: collaboration and generosity in the social age

There's no point in knowledge if you don't share it: collaboration and generosity in the social age | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

"In the social age, knowledge itself is no longer power: your ability to synthesise meaning out of multiple sources, your ability to add value, to reinvent yourself and effect change, your generosity of time and expertise, these are the things that add value."

Ally Greer's insight:

What an awesome post by Julian Stodd!


I couldn't agree more that this is the age of knowledge sharing. Knowledge is no longer difficult to attain; with the power of social networking and sharing, many experts on diverse subjects can showcase their knowledge, share it with others, and give those others the opportunity to turn it into new types of knowledge.


As Julian says, "With no barriers of geography, our potential to connect, to share on a global stage, is limitless!"

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Dan Aldridge's curator insight, April 3, 2013 11:03 AM

Great post by Julian Todd about the power of sharing and generosity in the soical age. Knowledge alone isn't enough. The challenge is to add value to conversations, create meaningful content, collaborate and give to your community. Thanks for the scoop by Ally Greer!

Ron Wagner's comment, April 9, 2013 3:34 PM
Thanks for your insight. That is what I have been doing since I retired. I blog on many subjects including the natural gas revolution, which is my
Ron Wagner's comment, April 9, 2013 3:34 PM
primary subject.
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On (Un)organized Consumption

On (Un)organized Consumption | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

I complain about not being able to manage my streams of information. I read how internet curators, like Brainpicker, sift through so much to find interesting things -- so we don't have to.

Ally Greer's insight:

Cheri Lucas Rowlands's thoughts on the "labyrinthine-ness of the web" are extremely interesting and thought provoking.


There are so many curators who dedicate their time sifting through feed after feed, article after article, to find the best content on their subject of expertise and share it with their audience. Naturally, these curators coexist with the readers - those who have no desire to go through all of the noise and simply want the best content delivered to them. 


This pairing will be the future of information consumption. In a world where millions of pieces of content are published to the web every single day, the algorithm will slowly become obsolete and the human curator will take over.


We've given this a try with our new Read.it app, and can't wait to see how information consumption will change when the content discovery is fueled by a community of experts.


Are you a curator or a reader?

more...
Treathyl Fox's comment, March 19, 2013 2:37 PM
"This pairing will be the future of information consumption." I rather like the sound of that.
Treathyl Fox's curator insight, March 19, 2013 2:40 PM

Pairing Scoop.It with another publishing platform, like Wordpress or Tumblr, makes for a happy marriage. 

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This Is Your Brain On Viral Ideas

This Is Your Brain On Viral Ideas | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it
What makes an idea spread? As you read this, there are likely thousands of meetings at different news publications, advertising firms, and government agencies trying to crack that code.
Ally Greer's insight:

Could this ongoing study be the key to finding out what makes content go viral? 


Upon studying brain activity of multiple people watching different videos, researchers Matt Lieberman and Emily Falk found something interesting: the triggers that cause us to want to share things might not be as related to the processing of this information as we think - in fact, a much bigger factor was a part of the brain called the bilateral TPJ, which is "the part of the brain which shifts our attention to focus on the minds of other people."


When we process content, we're thinking about who we can share it with and how it will be seen by others. Curation for an audience is literally built into our brains! Keep an eye out for the rest of this study (and share it with your friends, naturally).

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The Social Media Editor is Dead

The Social Media Editor is Dead | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

Every reporter works for Twitter now.


Via Guillaume Decugis
Ally Greer's insight:

How much longer before we remove the "social" distinction from social media and just start calling it media?

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, May 30, 2013 2:06 AM
Brilliant analysis by BuzzFeed's Rob Fishman, also a former social media editor at the Huffington Post. Developing the idea that social media is now too important to be handled by a single person, Fishman also gives a detailed description of the complex relationship between the Media and Social Media.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, June 15, 2013 8:03 AM
Social media editor is dead, long live the sentient mob.
The Fish Firm's comment, July 3, 2013 2:58 PM
Ally Greer! You are correct!
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Social technology for social learning: Voxer and ScoopIt

Social technology for social learning: Voxer and ScoopIt | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

The functionality is seamless: i don’t have to think about using it, i just have to think about my own knowledge management strategy, what do i want to say to add value to what i’m curating.

Ally Greer's insight:

I just love Julian Stodd's insights on social learning.

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The Glory Days of American Journalism

The Glory Days of American Journalism | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

The recent improvements in news distribution are astonishing. You don’t need to go to a specialty shop to find out-of-town newspapers or foreign magazines. Just open a browser. You can check on Israeli news sites when a new government is formed or during an American presidential visit and ignore them the rest of the year. The Internet also brings the enormous back catalog of journalism to life. That five-year-old Anderson essay on Cyprus is still relevant today. Recalling that he wrote a book on the island, I looked up an old Christopher Hitchens column on Cyprus yesterday evening.

Ally Greer's insight:

In this insightful Slate Magazine piece, Matthew Yglesias gives a fresh perspective on "information overload."


The fact that there is more information available than there ever was does not necessarily have to be a bad thing. Readers are now able to read 15 different perspectives on news stories and current issues, and there are also numerous ways to access news and information from the past - something that I think we often take for granted.


Before the Web, there wasn't a way to contextualize or add value to certain pieces of information. Yglesias writes that, "Best of all, today’s media ecology lets you add depth and context to the news" and I couldn't agree more.

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Marc Woltering's comment, March 21, 2013 4:54 AM
@gdecugis If you are a professional who needs and can afford to spend hours a week or even a day to collect and evaluatie information, information abundance is an apt qualification.If you want to keep up what's going on in the world in general, you (or at least I) want newspapers or online equivalents to do the collec
Marc Woltering's comment, March 21, 2013 4:57 AM
If you are a profesional who needs and can afford to spend hours a week or even a day collecting and evaluating stuff on the internet, information abundance is something useful. If you just want to keep up with what's going on in the world you (or at least I) want newspapers or online equivaltents to do the collecting and evaluating for you. Without these filters you get information overload.
A. Brian Dengler's comment, March 22, 2013 7:57 AM
The "abundance" of information is helpful. This abundance begs the next task of analyzing it, checking its veracity, and putting it into context.
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Time for next-generation interest-based content curation? RIP Google Reader

Time for next-generation interest-based content curation? RIP Google Reader | New Age Information Consumption | Scoop.it

As Frederic Lardinois of TechCrunch put it, RSS keeps playing an important role in the “backend plumbing for many web and mobile apps” and it surely introduced many of us to the idea of real-time content feeds. But with social media taking over, RSS readers have been outgrown on many fronts.

Ally Greer's insight:

With Google Reader gone, there's a huge opportunity to prove the value of user-curated content. Scoop.it's very own community of curators is sharing relevant information on subjects that they're interested in and knowledgeable about - who better to aid in the discovery of new content?

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