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How poverty influences a child's brain development

How poverty influences a child's brain development | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Science is figuring out exactly how the damage is done and what steps can be taken to halt and then heal it

Via Deborah McNelis, Tom Perran
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David Hain's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:11 AM

Reminded me of stories of the Romanian orphans from years ago and the power of a hug.

Audrey's comment, January 29, 2013 2:20 AM
There is is the possibility that poverty may prevent the stimulation needed for children to develop their curiosity which leads to learning. Poverty could be confining in terms of not sufficient nutrients in order to help develop the neural network. Also poverty seems to isolate children from social interactions which is critical for development; audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.
Mercor's curator insight, February 12, 2013 9:23 AM

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Biomarkers could predict Alzheimer's before it starts

Biomarkers could predict Alzheimer's before it starts | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

Study identifies potential blood test for cognitive decline.

A simple blood test has the potential to predict whether a healthy person will develop symptoms of dementia within two or three years. If larger studies uphold the results, the test could fill a major gap in strategies to combat brain degeneration, which is thought to show symptoms only at a stage when it too late to treat effectively. (...) - by Alison Abbott, Nature, 09 March 2014


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(Perspecive taking) Chris Kluwe: How augmented reality will change sports ... and build empathy

Chris Kluwe wants to look into the future of sports and think about how technology will help not just players and coaches, but fans. Here the former NFL punter envisions a future in which augmented reality will help people experience sports as if they are directly on the field — and maybe even help them see others in a new light, too.


Via Edwin Rutsch
Rhoda Floyd's insight:

This is still mostly about eye space, but it's an interesting look at where things will be headed.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 22, 11:44 PM

This technology has all sorts of applications!

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Neurobiology of empathy | On Psychology and Neuroscience

Neurobiology of empathy | On Psychology and Neuroscience | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Posts about Neurobiology of empathy written by psychneuro


  Our ability to express empathy is vital for our emotional and social functioning and well-being. As humans we are evolutionarily social beings, and as many of us have come to realize – some of us the hard way – you need to show empathy in order to receive it.  

 

==============================

Empathy is a key characteristic in ones

capacity for attaining a healthy co-existence between one’s peers and the rest

of the world.

==========

 

An absence in one’s ability to express empathy, in extreme cases, can lead to the facilitation of psychopathic tendencies. What are some neurobiological structures that characterize psychopaths in their inability to show concern for others? An interesting study done at the University of Chicago last year looked at the neuronal responses for pain in criminal psychopathic individuals.


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The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated

The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

This week, I’m headed to the Future of Storytelling summit, an unusual cross-disciplinary unconference exploring exactly what it says on the tin. Among the presenters is neuroeconomics pioneer Paul Zak, director of the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies and author of The Moral Molecule: The Source of Love and Prosperity.


======================

this short film on empathy,

neurochemistry, and the dramatic arc

=============


In this short film on empathy, neurochemistry, and the dramatic arc, directed and edited by my friend Kirby Ferguson and animated by Henrique Barone, Zak takes us inside his lab, where he studies how people respond to stories.


by Maria Popova



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Power failure: why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience

A study with low statistical power has a reduced chance of detecting a true effect, but it is less well appreciated that low power also reduces the likelihood that a statistically significant result reflects a true effect. Here, we show that the average statistical power of studies in the neurosciences is very low. The consequences of this include overestimates of effect size and low reproducibility of results. There are also ethical dimensions to this problem, as unreliable research is inefficient and wasteful. Improving reproducibility in neuroscience is a key priority and requires attention to well-established but often ignored methodological principles. - By Button KS et al., Nature Reviews Neuroscience 14, 365-376 (May 2013)


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COMING SOON: 'The Role of the Putative Mirror Neuron System in ...

COMING SOON: 'The Role of the Putative Mirror Neuron System in ... | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Provisional Abstract: Single-cell recording in macaque monkeys has uncovered mirror neurons, which respond both when a monkey observes a transitive action (an action involving an actor and an object), carries out that ...
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Voices may not trigger brain's reward centers in children with autism

Voices may not trigger brain's reward centers in children with autism | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

In autism, brain regions tailored to respond to voices are poorly connected to reward-processing circuits, according to a new study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The research could help explain why children with autism struggle to grasp the social and emotional aspects of human speech. "Weak brain connectivity may impede children with autism from experiencing speech as pleasurable," said Vinod Menon, PhD, senior author of the study, published online June 17 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

 Read more at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130617160853.htm

 


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See-through brains clarify connections

See-through brains clarify connections | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

Technique to make tissue transparent offers three-dimensional view of neural networks.


A chemical treatment that turns whole organs transparent offers a big boost to the field of ‘connectomics’ — the push to map the brain’s fiendishly complicated wiring. Scientists could use the technique to view large networks of neurons with unprecedented ease and accuracy. The technology also opens up new research avenues for old brains that were saved from patients and healthy donors. (...) - by Helen Shen, Nature News, 10 April 2013

 


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The Top 10 Challenges for Brain Science in 2013

The Top 10 Challenges for Brain Science in 2013 | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
2012 was a big year for brain science, and 2013 promises to be even bigger.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Lots of room for Neuroanthropology, here.

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Coletta P. Kahn's comment, July 25, 2013 2:15 AM
Thanks for this!
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Major step toward an Alzheimer's vaccine

A team of researchers from Université Laval, CHU de Québec, and pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has discovered a way to stimulate the brain's natural defense mechanisms in people with Alzheimer's disease. This major breakthrough, details of which are presented today in an early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), opens the door to the development of a treatment for Alzheimer's disease and a vaccine to prevent the illness. (...) - eurekalert, 15/02/2013


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Julien Hering, PhD's curator insight, February 28, 2013 2:24 AM

Ce communiqué de presse disponible aussi en français

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How poverty influences a child's brain development

How poverty influences a child's brain development | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Science is figuring out exactly how the damage is done and what steps can be taken to halt and then heal it

Via Deborah McNelis, Tom Perran
more...
David Hain's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:11 AM

Reminded me of stories of the Romanian orphans from years ago and the power of a hug.

Audrey's comment, January 29, 2013 2:20 AM
There is is the possibility that poverty may prevent the stimulation needed for children to develop their curiosity which leads to learning. Poverty could be confining in terms of not sufficient nutrients in order to help develop the neural network. Also poverty seems to isolate children from social interactions which is critical for development; audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.
Mercor's curator insight, February 12, 2013 9:23 AM

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Tan Le: A headset that reads your brainwaves | Video on TED.com

Tan Le's astonishing new computer interface reads its user's brainwaves, making it possible to control virtual objects, and even physical electronics, with mere thoughts (and a little concentration). She demos the headset, and talks about its far-reaching applications.

Tan Le is the founder & CEO of Emotiv Lifescience, a bioinformatics company that's working on identifying biomarkers for mental and other neurological conditions using electroencephalography (EEG).


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The Psychology of Cults - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Psychology of Cults - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

Podcast from RadioNational Australia.

 

If you sign up to a weekend personal development workshop, you don’t really expect to emerge 10 years later a shadow of your former emotional self. What sets many groups apart from what we regard as cults is a range of powerful psychological techniques which can be difficult to see through—particularly if you are at a vulnerable time of your life. We hear the story of one woman’s escape from a cult and some insights into those persuasive techniques


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ibiss helter's curator insight, September 20, 2013 3:41 AM

nice ine

EerstehulpSEO's comment, September 24, 2013 10:57 PM
awesome
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Brain-mapping projects to join forces

Brain-mapping projects to join forces | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

US and European research programmes will begin coordinating research.

 

It seems a natural pairing, almost like the hemispheres of a human brain: two controversial and ambitious projects that seek to decipher the body's control center are poised to join forces.

The European Union’s €1-billion (US$1.3-billion) Human Brain Project (HBP) and the United States’ $1-billion Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative will launch a collaboration later this year, according to government officials involved in both projects.(...) - by Sara Reardon, Nature, 18 March 2014


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Neuroscience's grand question - Brandeis University

Neuroscience's grand question - Brandeis University | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Neuroscience's grand question
Brandeis University
How this continuous rebuilding takes place without affecting our ability to think, remember, learn or otherwise experience the world is one of neuroscience's biggest questions.
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Why aren't we more compassionate?

Why aren't we more compassionate? | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence,

asks why we aren't more compassionate

more of the time.


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The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

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Audrey's comment, September 9, 2013 3:01 AM
Yes.... Start young. This means pre-school education.
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Finding Middle Ground on Neuroscience | Neuroanthropology

Finding Middle Ground on Neuroscience | Neuroanthropology | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
And an attempt to find the middle ground in the neurobollocks debate? http://t.co/jdujmkTOo8
Rhoda Floyd's insight:

There is a middle ground between the hyperbole and the sceptical dismantling of neuroscience. 

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Altruism and Empathy

The Helix Center for Interdisciplinary Investigation of the New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute Altruism and Empathy Saturday, June 8th, 2013 Is self...

 

Is selflessness a necessary illusion? Are we condemned to weigh the costs (whether consciously or not) of the welfare of others against the benefits to ourselves ? We develop a "theory of mind" around age three, concurrently building our capacity to recognize emotions experienced by others. In other words, we begin to develop empathy, the sine qua non of compassion, and hence, of altruism. But if altruism is evolutionarily adaptive, as many believe, can it be unadulterated by self-interest? Or might acts of altruism truly reveal "the better angels of our nature"?


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NeuroDojo: Neuroscience doesn't need a grand theory to advance

NeuroDojo: Neuroscience doesn't need a grand theory to advance | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
That doesn't sound like a theory of the brain. That sounds like what is desired is a theory of consciousness. This does not surprise me; it's the big hairy audacious goal for many neuroscientists. I have a message for my fellow ...
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We feel, therefore we learn: The neuroscience of social emotion. Daniel Siegel - The Monthly (subscription)

We feel, therefore we learn: The neuroscience of social emotion. Daniel Siegel - The Monthly (subscription) | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
We feel, therefore we learn: The neuroscience of social emotion. Daniel Siegel
The Monthly (subscription)
We feel, therefore we learn: The neuroscience of social emotion. Daniel Siegel.
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Big Neuroscience: Billions and Billions (Maybe) to Unravel Mysteries of the Brain

Big Neuroscience: Billions and Billions (Maybe) to Unravel Mysteries of the Brain | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

The era of Big Neuroscience has arrived.

 

In late January, The Human Brain Project—an attempt to create a computer simulation of the brain at every scale from the nano nano to the macro biotic—announced that it had successfully arranged a billion Euro funding package for a 10-year run.

And then on Feb. 18, an article in The New York Times took the wraps off a plan to spend perhaps billions of dollars for an effort to record large collections of brain cells and figure out what exactly they are doing. (...) - by Gary Stix, Nature, 28 February 2013


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Neural networks in psychiatry

Neural networks in psychiatry | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

[Abstract] Over the past three decades numerous imaging studies have revealed structural and functional brain abnormalities in patients with neuropsychiatric diseases. These structural and functional brain changes are frequently found in multiple, discrete brain areas and may include frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortices as well as subcortical brain areas. However, while the structural and functional brain changes in patients are found in anatomically separated areas, these are connected through (long distance) fibers, together forming networks. Thus, instead of representing separate (patho)-physiological entities, these local changes in the brains of patients with psychiatric disorders may in fact represent different parts of the same ‘elephant’, i.e., the (altered) brain network. Recent developments in quantitative analysis of complex networks, based largely on graph theory, have revealed that the brain's structure and functions have features of complex networks. Here we briefly introduce several recent developments in neural network studies relevant for psychiatry, including from the 2013 special issue on Neural Networks in Psychiatry in European Neuropsychopharmacology. We conclude that new insights will be revealed from the neural network approaches to brain imaging in psychiatry that hold the potential to find causes for psychiatric disorders and (preventive) treatments in the future. - by Pol HH et al., European Neuropsychopharmacology, in Press, Available online 8 February 2013


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Daniel C. Dennett on an attempt to understand the mind; autonomic neurons, culture and computational architecture

Daniel C. Dennett on an attempt to understand the mind; autonomic neurons, culture and computational architecture | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it
Daniel C. Dennett on an attempt to understand the mind; autonomic neurons, culture and computational architecture
“ “What Darwin and Turing had both discovered, in their different ways, was the...

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Amira's curator insight, January 27, 2013 12:37 PM

"We’re beginning to come to grips with the idea that your brain is not this well-organized hierarchical control system where everything is in order, a very dramatic vision of bureaucracy. In fact, it’s much more like anarchy with some elements of democracy. Sometimes you can achieve stability and mutual aid and a sort of calm united front, and then everything is hunky-dory, but then it’s always possible for things to get out of whack and for one alliance or another to gain control, and then you get obsessions and delusions and so forth.

You begin to think about the normal well-tempered mind, in effect, the well-organized mind, as an achievement, not as the base state. (...) You’re going to have a parallel architecture because, after all, the brain is obviously massively parallel. It’s going to be a connectionist network. (...)

[Y]ou begin to realize that control in brains is very different from control in computers. (...) Each neuron is imprisoned in your brain. I now think of these as cells within cells, as cells within prison cells. Realize that every neuron in your brain, every human cell in your body (leaving aside all the symbionts), is a direct descendent of eukaryotic cells that lived and fended for themselves for about a billion years as free-swimming, free-living little agents. They fended for themselves, and they survived.

They had to develop an awful lot of know-how, a lot of talent, a lot of self-protective talent to do that. When they joined forces into multi-cellular creatures, they gave up a lot of that. They became, in effect, domesticated. They became part of larger, more monolithic organizations.  (...)

Maybe a lot of the neurons in our brains are not just capable but, if you like, motivated to be more adventurous, more exploratory or risky in the way they comport themselves, in the way they live their lives. They’re struggling amongst themselves with each other for influence, just for staying alive, and there’s competition going on between individual neurons. As soon as that happens, you have room for cooperation to create alliances, and I suspect that a more free-wheeling, anarchic organization is the secret of our greater capacities of creativity, imagination, thinking outside the box and all that, and the price we pay for it is our susceptibility to obsessions, mental illnesses, delusions and smaller problems.

We got risky brains that are much riskier than the brains of other mammals even, even more risky than the brains of chimpanzees, and that this could be partly a matter of a few simple mutations in control genes that release some of the innate competitive talent that is still there in the genomes of the individual neurons. But I don’t think that genetics is the level to explain this. You need culture to explain it."

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Neuroscience in The News | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 2:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
Jim Siders's curator insight, March 20, 2013 9:06 AM

to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

sarah's curator insight, May 30, 2013 11:04 PM

Très intéressant.