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Rescooped by Jim Siders from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't

What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

The sort of short, simple explanations of complex brain functions that often make for good headlines rarely turn out to be true.


Via Sandeep Gautam, Tom Perran
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Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, December 4, 2012 1:52 PM
Super article. Thank you so much for posting.
Emre Erdogan's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:15 AM

Our brain is Mach more çöpler than we know

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Your Brain Is Hooked on Being Right

Your Brain Is Hooked on Being Right | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
The adrenaline and dopamine rush you get from winning an argument feels good. Too good.

Via Deborah McNelis, Tom Perran
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John Michel's curator insight, April 2, 2013 5:58 AM

I'm sure it's happened to you: You're in a tense team meeting trying to defend your position on a big project and start to feel yourself losing ground. Your voice gets louder. You talk over one of your colleagues and correct his point of view. He pushes back, so you go into overdrive to convince everyone you're right. It feels like an out of body experience — and in many ways it is. In terms of its neurochemistry, your brain has been hijacked.

Rescooped by Jim Siders from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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The Brain Science Behind Learning

The Brain Science Behind Learning | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Details how the infographic Brainy Approaches to Learning supports Personalized Learning.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, Tom Perran
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Audrey's comment, May 28, 2013 5:10 PM
I feel overwhelmed. There is so much to learn.
Johani Karonen's curator insight, May 29, 2013 3:01 AM

Lump or not - the brain always amazes me.

Laura Lubin, MS. Ed. HRD's curator insight, June 22, 2013 8:58 AM

Amazing view into the science and how to personalize learning with universality in mind. 

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The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
The Neurological Explanation For Practice Makes Perfect

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Audrey's comment, September 9, 2013 6:01 AM
Yes.... Start young. This means pre-school education.
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Voices may not trigger brain's reward centers in children with autism

Voices may not trigger brain's reward centers in children with autism | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

In autism, brain regions tailored to respond to voices are poorly connected to reward-processing circuits, according to a new study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The research could help explain why children with autism struggle to grasp the social and emotional aspects of human speech. "Weak brain connectivity may impede children with autism from experiencing speech as pleasurable," said Vinod Menon, PhD, senior author of the study, published online June 17 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

 

Read more at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130617160853.htm

 


Via Stewart-Marshall, Natalie Stewart, Tom Perran
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Rescooped by Jim Siders from Neuroscience_topics
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12 talks on understanding the brain

12 talks on understanding the brain | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

[Videos] Read Montague is interested in the human dopamine system -- or, as he puts it in this illuminating talk from TEDGlobal 2012, that which makes us "chase sex, food and salt" and therefore survive. (...) - by Kate Torgovnick, TED blog, September 24, 2012


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Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask?

Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask? | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

The first role of trained infotention is to recognize whether or not  multitasking, single-minded focus,  or alert but diffused attention is the most appropriate mind-tool for the task at hand. However, for those many situations in which multitasking is either necessary or preferable or both, the most important question is whether -- and to what degree -- multitasking more effectively is a learnable skill. -- Howard 

 

"Results showed that participants did much better at multitasking after training. Interestingly the benefits transferred to the untrained dual task. Brain training can thus be used to get better at multitasking!"


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Jenna Becerra's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:52 AM

Before one can think about multitasking, it is important to take into account that it is more than just practice. One has to be metacognitive in his or her approach to learning and paying attention to what is important. Know individual tendencies, but also know that a mind can be trained. Multitasking is not always the right approach, but it is often inevitable. Training one's mind to multitask effectively will only result in efficiency.

Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:28 AM

Can't the brain be trained in every task? Why not multitasking as well?

Audrey's comment, May 16, 2013 6:37 AM
Yes. Agree.
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Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog

Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Do you know why infographics that combine compelling graphics, charts, lists and texts are so popular and spread so quickly? Our brain processes visual information 60,000 times faster than printed ...

Via Tom Perran
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Sally DeCost's curator insight, December 23, 2012 11:09 AM

Great infographic for teachers to think about!

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Scientists construct first map of how the brain organizes everything we see

Scientists construct first map of how the brain organizes everything we see | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

Our eyes may be our window to the world, but how do we make sense of the thousands of images that flood our retinas each day? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that the brain is wired to put in order all the categories of objects and actions that we see. They have created the first interactive map of how the brain organizes these groupings. (...) - By Yasmin Anwar, Media Relations UC Berkeley News Center, December 19, 2012 


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Physical Therapy In Autism Spectrum Disorders

Physical Therapy In Autism Spectrum Disorders | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

The CDC estimated a 1% worldwide prevalence for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the United States, 1 out of 88 kids is diagnosed with ASD (according to data from a survey conducted in 2008). Autism spectrum disorders are characterized by diminished social interaction skills, stereotypic engagement in repetitive tasks, lengthy visual engagement with a target, refusal to deviate from set rituals and diminished spontaneity in expressing emotions. In addition to behavioral difficulties, reduced motor abilities are also reported. (...) - by Shefali Sabharanjak, PhD, Brain Blogger, February 27, 2013


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Saman Zafar's curator insight, May 4, 2013 9:50 AM

hence, therapeutic sessions where the participants are asked to observe and learn from the actions of therapist are likely to succeed in children suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorder. 

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Neural networks in psychiatry

Neural networks in psychiatry | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

[Abstract] Over the past three decades numerous imaging studies have revealed structural and functional brain abnormalities in patients with neuropsychiatric diseases. These structural and functional brain changes are frequently found in multiple, discrete brain areas and may include frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortices as well as subcortical brain areas. However, while the structural and functional brain changes in patients are found in anatomically separated areas, these are connected through (long distance) fibers, together forming networks. Thus, instead of representing separate (patho)-physiological entities, these local changes in the brains of patients with psychiatric disorders may in fact represent different parts of the same ‘elephant’, i.e., the (altered) brain network. Recent developments in quantitative analysis of complex networks, based largely on graph theory, have revealed that the brain's structure and functions have features of complex networks. Here we briefly introduce several recent developments in neural network studies relevant for psychiatry, including from the 2013 special issue on Neural Networks in Psychiatry in European Neuropsychopharmacology. We conclude that new insights will be revealed from the neural network approaches to brain imaging in psychiatry that hold the potential to find causes for psychiatric disorders and (preventive) treatments in the future. - by Pol HH et al., European Neuropsychopharmacology, in Press, Available online 8 February 2013


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9 Ways Neuroscience Has Changed The Classroom

9 Ways Neuroscience Has Changed The Classroom | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
9 Ways Neuroscience Has Changed The Classroom (RT @TeachThought: 9 Ways Neuroscience Has Changed The Classroom http://t.co/QhLjp7qa)
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Addicted! Scientists show how internet dependency alters the human brain

Addicted! Scientists show how internet dependency alters the human brain | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

Internet addiction has for the first time been linked with changes in the brain similar to those seen in people addicted to alcohol, cocaine and cannabis. (The Independent)


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Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog

Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Do you know why infographics that combine compelling graphics, charts, lists and texts are so popular and spread so quickly? Our brain processes visual information 60,000 times faster than printed ...

Via Tom Perran
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Sally DeCost's curator insight, December 23, 2012 11:09 AM

Great infographic for teachers to think about!

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Your Child's Brain on Math - Pacific Standard

Your Child's Brain on Math - Pacific Standard | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Pacific Standard Your Child's Brain on Math Pacific Standard Parents whose children are struggling with math often view intense tutoring as the best way to help them master crucial skills, but a new study released on Monday suggests that for some...

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Audrey's comment, May 12, 2013 7:01 PM
The most effective mathematics tutoring I have seen was by a teenage student who demonstrated basic principles to his tutees and used everyday examples to consolidate understanding. He actually understood that his tutees did not have knowledge of basic principles, Audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.
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Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning

Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

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Tom Perran's curator insight, July 14, 2013 8:55 AM

Lots of good reasons provided here including the question of time spent providing "extra" examples.

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Understanding How the Brain Thinks | Edutopia

Understanding How the Brain Thinks | Edutopia | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Empowering and connecting teachers, administrators, and parents with innovative solutions and resources to better education. Join the conversation today!

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Learning and reconsolidation implicate different synaptic mechanisms

Learning and reconsolidation implicate different synaptic mechanisms | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

Synaptic mechanisms underlying memory reconsolidation after retrieval are largely unknown. Here we report that synapses in projections to the lateral nucleus of the amygdala implicated in auditory fear conditioning, which are potentiated by learning, enter a labile state after memory reactivation, and must be restabilized through a postsynaptic mechanism implicating the mammalian target of rapamycin kinase-dependent signaling. Fear-conditioning–induced synaptic enhancements were primarily presynaptic in origin. Reconsolidation blockade with rapamycin, inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin kinase activity, suppressed synaptic potentiation in slices from fear-conditioned rats. Surprisingly, this reduction of synaptic efficacy was mediated by post- but not presynaptic mechanisms. These findings suggest that different plasticity rules may apply to the processes underlying the acquisition of original fear memory and postreactivational stabilization of fear-conditioning–induced synaptic enhancements mediating fear memory reconsolidation. - by Li Y. et al., PNAS, vol. 110 no. 12, 4798–4803



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Scientists decode why Einstein was a genius

Scientists decode why Einstein was a genius | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Physicist Albert Einstein's brain had an extraordinary prefrontal cortex - unlike those of most people - which may have contributed to his remarkable genius,
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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, December 17, 2012 5:42 PM

The pros and cons of technology ... a must read.

Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 5:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
sarah's curator insight, May 31, 2013 2:04 AM

Très intéressant.

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How poverty influences a child's brain development

How poverty influences a child's brain development | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
Science is figuring out exactly how the damage is done and what steps can be taken to halt and then heal it
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Obama Seeking to Boost Study of Human Brain

Obama Seeking to Boost Study of Human Brain | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

The Obama administration is planning a decade-long scientific effort to examine the workings of the human brain and build a comprehensive map of its activity. (...) - by John Markoff, The New York Times, February 17,2013


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Current status of chemokines in the adult CNS

Current status of chemokines in the adult CNS | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it

Highlights

A better understanding of the role of chemokines and their receptors in the CNS in addition to the immune system.This review focuses on recent data about three couples CXCL12/CXCR4, CCL2/CCR2, and CX3CL1/CX3CR1 in the adult CNS.Description of their cellular expression, distributions, and roles in neurotransmission and neuromodulation.This review summarizes current evidence on the role of these chemokine systems in the pathogenesis of CNS disorders.

by Réaux-Le Goazigo A. et al., Progress in Neurobiology, In Press, Available online 27 February 2013

 


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Special call-in show on pre-kindergarten education

Special call-in show on pre-kindergarten education | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
As part of our State of Opportunity reporting project, Michigan Radio's Jennifer White hosted a special, hour-long call-in show examining the importance (RT @Ready_Nation: Radion in #Michigan on #PreK education http://t.co/Bs9ZJelu...
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The neuroscience of happiness

The neuroscience of happiness | neuroscience in special education | Scoop.it
New discoveries are shedding light on the activities that make us happy.

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