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Exciting implications of the neuro-immune link no one is talking about

Exciting implications of the neuro-immune link no one is talking about | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Maybe the problem is modern science’s difficulty defining the soul itself. Maybe we are about to do just that.
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How Your Brain Copes With Stress

How Your Brain Copes With Stress | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Scientists take a look at how the body deals with stress, and make a discovery about our coping mechanisms.
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A New Window to Understanding the Brain

A New Window to Understanding the Brain | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Neuroscience News has recent neuroscience research articles, brain research news, neurology studies and neuroscience resources for neuroscientists, students, and science fans and is always free to join.
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10 Easy Ways To Practice Mindfulness

10 Easy Ways To Practice Mindfulness | neuroscience | Scoop.it

Via Birkbeck Careers & Employability
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Birkbeck Careers & Employability's curator insight, September 8, 2015 7:03 AM

Mindfulness can transform your life- it gets you out of automatic pilot and living in the moment. It makes you more aware of your emotions, calmer, more productive, less judgemental and more accepting of others and yourself. Is your life being diluted by all the distractions, gadgets, noise of  your hectic lifestyle? Has it made you lose the connection to yourself? How present are you? Maybe it is time for you to stop and embrace the moment for a happier life. This article  by Yatin Khulbe lists 10 ways you can easily practice Mindfulness and it doesn’t cost you a penny! If you already practice Mindfulness, how has it helped you! Share your experience with us!

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Managers Should Study The Amygdala And Forget The MBA

Managers Should Study The Amygdala And Forget The MBA | neuroscience | Scoop.it
It's one of the most critical regions of the brain for business thinking. ...

 

What is the role of emotions in effective business leadership?

 

In business you’re dealing with more than just logical, linear consequences; you’re dealing with people. And people are as driven by emotions as they are by their thoughts.

For example, a lot of people are talking these days about the importance of empathy in the work environment. Neuroscience has now shown us that there are two types of empathy: cognitive empathy and emotional empathy.

 

The latter is when you are in a conversation and you make a gesture to show that you relate to what the other person is saying — say, an “ah.” Cognitive empathy, on the other hand, is about demonstrating that you understand another person’s point of view. Using this form of empathy, you might start a sentence with, “So from your perspective…


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Is Chocolate the New Brain Food?

Is Chocolate the New Brain Food? | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Hot chocolate may improve blood flow to the brain for some. (Image credit: Getty Images) Dr. Lara Devgan reports: We’ve all heard about the healing powers of red wine – in moderation, of course.
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What's In Chocolate, Cocoa That Might Benefit Brain Health? - Forbes

Neurology study suggests chemicals in chocolate may benefit brain health and fight certain neurodegenerative diseases http://t.co/iNJnub7j6m
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The Perfect Workspace (According to Science)

The Perfect Workspace (According to Science) | neuroscience | Scoop.it
The perfect office: high ceilings, lots of colors, and round furniture. And plants. Don't forget the plants. (Space influences us. Psychology & neurology influence space. And this article validates my messy desk.
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Audio-Digest Foundation Announces the Release of Neurology Volume 04 ... - San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

Audio-Digest Foundation Announces the Release of Neurology Volume 04 ... - San Francisco Chronicle (press release) | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Audio-Digest Foundation Announces the Release of Neurology Volume 04 ...
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Is YOUR brain supertuned? Most intelligent have more efficient brains

Is YOUR brain supertuned? Most intelligent have more efficient brains | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Researchers say general cognitive ability may be the result of a 'well-tuned brain network' - and may even be able to develop therapies to tune up the mind of those less intelligent.
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IBM is one step closer to mimicking the human brain

IBM is one step closer to mimicking the human brain | neuroscience | Scoop.it
A breakthrough in cognitive computing has enabled scientists to imitate large populations of neurons
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Stopping Exercise Decreases Brain Blood Flow

Stopping Exercise Decreases Brain Blood Flow | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Neuroscience News has recent neuroscience research articles, brain research news, neurology studies and neuroscience resources for neuroscientists, students, and science fans and is always free to join.
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Mindfulness At Work: 5 Tricks For A Healthier, Less Stressful Work Day - Huffington Post

Mindfulness At Work: 5 Tricks For A Healthier, Less Stressful Work Day - Huffington Post | neuroscience | Scoop.it

Mindfulness At Work: 5 Tricks For A Healthier, Less Stressful Work Day

"Meditation is an act of sanity," scientist and writer John Kabat-Zinn told Google employees in a mindfulness session at the company's headquarters in 2007.


Via ozziegontang, Dennis T OConnor, Julie McFadden
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ozziegontang's curator insight, June 24, 2013 11:51 AM

A good read to help better understand how to integrate mindfulness into daily practice.

Jo Hale's curator insight, March 9, 2014 1:30 PM

Some tips you could try to practice mindfulness 

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Neurology Professor's YouTube Video Wins National Contest to ...

Neurology Professor's YouTube Video Wins National Contest to ... | neuroscience | Scoop.it
A 10-minute YouTube video explaining the basics of the human nervous system has won a UW-Madison neurologist a trip to educational innovator Khan Academy, and a chance to help prepare pre-medical students for a new ...
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New neurology professor identifies habit cells - The Dartmouth

New neurology professor identifies habit cells The Dartmouth By training lab rats to learn complex maze paths and tracking their activity over time, psychology professor Kyle Smith used optogenetics to identify the cells responsible for habit...
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Functional #Neurology Daily

Functional #Neurology Daily | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Functional #Neurology Daily, by Dr Yolanda Loafer: The Best in #FunctionalNeurology on Twitter! (RT @DrYolandaLoafer: Functional #Neurology Daily is out!
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Brain overload as toddler explains missing childhood memories

Brain overload as toddler explains missing childhood memories | neuroscience | Scoop.it

Scientists -- and parents -- have long wondered why we don’t remember anything that happened before age 3. As all parents know, no matter how momentous an event is in a toddler’s life, the memory soon drifts away and within months there isn’t even a wisp of it left.

 

Now a new study shows that “infantile amnesia” may be due to the rapid growth of nerve cells in the hippocampus, the brain region responsible for filing new experiences into long-term memory. The study was presented Friday at the annual meeting of the Canadian Association for Neuroscience.

 

While youngsters do seem to remember important events for a short time after they occur, they lose these memories as time goes by, says study co-author Paul Frankland, a senior scientist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. “They can’t form stable memories of what happens in the first few years,” Frankland says. “I have a daughter who is 4 years old and because we were working on this study, I would always ask her questions about her memories of places we visited 2, 3 months ago. It’s clear that she can form memories with quite some detail. But four years from now she won’t remember anything.”

 

Frankland suspected that memories actually got filed away into long-term storage, but that the hippocampus lost track of where they’d been stacked during the rapid growth phase that takes place in the first few years of life.

As the hippocampus matures, huge numbers of new neurons come on line and need to be hooked into existing circuits, he says. The most likely scenario is that in all that restructuring, the brain “forgets” where it stored the memories.

 

As the expansion slows down, the brain can better keep track of where everything is filed away – so long-term memory gets better as youngsters get older.

 

To test his theory, Frankland gathered up some baby mice and slowed down the rate at which new neurons were formed in the hippocampus.

Normally baby mice have the same problem with long-term memory that human toddlers do – if you teach them to navigate a maze, after a few days they’ll forget how to find their way around. But with neurons being produced more slowly, the mice now were able to form long-term memories and remember how to get through the maze.

 

Dr. Liana Apostolova of the UCLA Brain Research Institute was delighted to have an answer to why her 6-year-old doesn’t seem to remember things that she recollects as very important. "This is a very interesting finding,” she says. “And it ties in greatly with what's in the literature."

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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