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A life of inspiration - Nelson Mandela 1918-2013

A tribute to a life of inspiration. Nelson Mandela - 1918-2013 at peace! Thank you for eternal example and inspiration!
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How Do Artists Differ From Bank Officers? | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

How Do Artists Differ From Bank Officers? | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | neuroscience | Scoop.it
What are creative people like? As we saw in my prior post, various creativity researchers tend to converge on the same conclusion: creative people are complex. ...
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10 Optical Illusions That Will Blow Your Mind

10 Optical Illusions That Will Blow Your Mind | neuroscience | Scoop.it
If you’re in the mood to have your mind blown, these 10 optical illusions will definitely do the trick.
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Emotion regulation choice: Selecting between cognitive regulation strategies to control emotion | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Emotion regulation choice: Selecting between cognitive regulation strategies to control emotion | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | neuroscience | Scoop.it

"Consider the anger that arises in a heated argument with your romantic partner, or the dreadful anxious anticipation in the dentist's waiting room prior to a root canal procedure. Our daily lives are densely populated with events that make us emotional. Luckily, however, we developed numerous ways to control or regulate our emotions in order to adapt (Gross, 2007;Koole, 2009 for reviews). A central remaining challenge to explain adaptation, involves understanding how individuals choose between the different emotion regulation strategies in order to fit with differing situational demands. Specifically, when is the aforementioned romantic partner or dental patient more likely to “put aside” or disengage from the emotional situation, and when are they more likely to “make sense” or engage with their emotional reactions?

 

In this opinion article we concentrate on the intersection between affective science and decision making as manifested in emotion regulation choice, defined as the act of making an autonomous choice between different regulation strategies that are available in a particular context."

 

Sheppes, G. & Levin, Z. (in press). Emotion regulation choice: Selecting between cognitive regulation strategies to control emotion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00179


Via Eileen Cardillo
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Eileen Cardillo's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:09 PM

A valuable, clear read for anyone aiming to translate Buddhist concepts into language familiar to cognitive psychologists (or vice verse). The article focuses on deliberate regulatory choices at early and late stages of emotion processing - i.e. distraction, which entails disengaging attention from emotional information versus reappraisal, which involves intentional engagement with emotional information coupled with reinterpretation of its meaning. This same contrast is of central relevance and familiarity to meditators, although the authors do not reference this particular context. Their conclusion, however, could just as well have been a segue to discussing emotion regulation in meditators: "Central factors such as prior practice with choosing regulation strategies in different situations, strong motivational forces to perform one strategy over another and a general central executive ability that allows efficient information processing may all influence regulatory choices."

Shubham Tyagi's curator insight, May 23, 2013 1:49 PM

I still have to read it... very long but intersting

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Framework for 21st Century Learning - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills

Framework for 21st Century Learning - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills | neuroscience | Scoop.it

The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes (a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century.


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Nalya Ovshieva's comment, June 27, 2013 6:04 AM
The overview of 21st Century Learning focuses on student mastery of 21st century skills indispensable to succeeding in work and life in the 21st century.
Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 4, 2013 5:48 PM

This is an excellent summary of 21st Century learning!

Selin Gelinci's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

This is a useful resource as  it explores further into the framework for the 21st century learning. It combines a discrete focus on the outcomes, specific skillsa and content knowledge that should be gained through the learning program. The diagram helps understanding further into the support system and how it all collaborates. This is benefical to me as a future teacher as it gives me a clear understanding of how i can manage my time effectively and make sure i am always covering aspects that are relevant to the 21st century learning.

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Appli YouTube : Microsoft et Google trouvent un accord

Appli YouTube : Microsoft et Google trouvent un accord | neuroscience | Scoop.it
Après avoir refusé de développer une application native et exigé de Microsoft le retrait de la sienne, Google a finalement accepté, d’ici quelques semaines, de sortir YouTube sur Windows Phone 8.
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Emotion regulation choice: Selecting between cognitive regulation strategies to control emotion | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Emotion regulation choice: Selecting between cognitive regulation strategies to control emotion | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | neuroscience | Scoop.it

"Consider the anger that arises in a heated argument with your romantic partner, or the dreadful anxious anticipation in the dentist's waiting room prior to a root canal procedure. Our daily lives are densely populated with events that make us emotional. Luckily, however, we developed numerous ways to control or regulate our emotions in order to adapt (Gross, 2007;Koole, 2009 for reviews). A central remaining challenge to explain adaptation, involves understanding how individuals choose between the different emotion regulation strategies in order to fit with differing situational demands. Specifically, when is the aforementioned romantic partner or dental patient more likely to “put aside” or disengage from the emotional situation, and when are they more likely to “make sense” or engage with their emotional reactions?

 

In this opinion article we concentrate on the intersection between affective science and decision making as manifested in emotion regulation choice, defined as the act of making an autonomous choice between different regulation strategies that are available in a particular context."

 

Sheppes, G. & Levin, Z. (in press). Emotion regulation choice: Selecting between cognitive regulation strategies to control emotion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00179


Via Eileen Cardillo, digitalgeneration
more...
Eileen Cardillo's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:09 PM

A valuable, clear read for anyone aiming to translate Buddhist concepts into language familiar to cognitive psychologists (or vice verse). The article focuses on deliberate regulatory choices at early and late stages of emotion processing - i.e. distraction, which entails disengaging attention from emotional information versus reappraisal, which involves intentional engagement with emotional information coupled with reinterpretation of its meaning. This same contrast is of central relevance and familiarity to meditators, although the authors do not reference this particular context. Their conclusion, however, could just as well have been a segue to discussing emotion regulation in meditators: "Central factors such as prior practice with choosing regulation strategies in different situations, strong motivational forces to perform one strategy over another and a general central executive ability that allows efficient information processing may all influence regulatory choices."

Shubham Tyagi's curator insight, May 23, 2013 1:49 PM

I still have to read it... very long but intersting