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Online consumer behaviour survey: 10 myths identified | Digital Business

Online consumer behaviour survey: 10 myths identified | Digital Business | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it
To discuss a report by PwC and highlight its relevance for SMEs and digital businesses.
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Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from The MarTech Digest
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The Rising Science Of Social Influence — How Predictable Is Your Online Behaviour?

The Rising Science Of Social Influence — How Predictable Is Your Online Behaviour? | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it

Recent developments and interest in academic research confirm that the study of social influence is a well-posted scientific problem. As online social networks become mainstream, their data allows scientists and companies to gain previously unprecedented insights into social phenomena. Nine out of ScienceDirect’s top 25 academic papers in Computer Science study human behaviour on online social networks. This summer Science, one of the most prestigious and hardest-to-get-into academic journals featured an article on identifying influential and susceptible members in social networks. And in addition there is a growing number of scientific meetings devoted to the study of online influence.

 

 


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Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Digital Delights for Learners
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Digital Citizenship k-6

Digital Citizenship k-6 | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it
Digital Citizenship is a suite of resources for early stage 1/stage 1, stage 2 and stage 3 students to support safe online behaviour. This resource includes game-based learning, lessons, videos, and parent and teacher support materials.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Gianfranco D'Aversa's curator insight, January 6, 2013 12:22 PM

Digital Citizenship is a suite of resources for early stage 1/stage 1, stage 2 and stage 3 students to support safe online behaviour. This resource includes game-based learning, lessons, videos, and parent and teacher support materials.

Sally Tilley's curator insight, January 8, 2013 8:26 PM

Already use it for K-2 and it's brilliant!

Ra's curator insight, January 30, 2013 3:37 PM

Smooth presentation, putting understanding and decision making in the hands of students.

Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Papers
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A Simple Generative Model of Collective Online Behaviour

Human activities---from voter mobilization to political protests---increasingly take place in online environments, providing novel opportunities for relating individual behaviours to population-level outcomes. The recent availability of data sets that capture the behaviour of individuals participating in online social systems has driven the emerging field of computational social science, as large-scale empirical data sets enable the development of detailed computational models of individual and collective behaviour. Given the inherent limitations of observational data, it is crucial to investigate the extent to which models of collective dynamics can distinguish between different individual-level mechanisms. Here we introduce a simple generative model for the collective behaviour of millions of social networking site users who are deciding between different software applications. Our model incorporates two distinct components: one is associated with recent decisions of users, and the other reflects the cumulative popularity of each application. Importantly, although various combinations of the two mechanisms yield long-time behaviour that is consistent with data, only models that strongly emphasize recent popularity of applications over their cumulative popularity reproduce the observed temporal dynamics. Our approach demonstrates the value of even very simple generative models in understanding collective social behaviour, and it highlights the need to address temporal dynamics---not just long-time behaviour---when modelling complex social systems.

 

A Simple Generative Model of Collective Online Behaviour

James P. Gleeson, Davide Cellai, Jukka-Pekka Onnela, Mason A. Porter, Felix Reed-Tsochas

http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.7440


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Spaceweaver's curator insight, June 3, 2013 5:38 PM

to investigate

Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Neuromarketing Insights
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13 Neuromarketing Lead Generation Tactics

13 Neuromarketing Lead Generation Tactics | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it
Human behaviour can be swayed by a whole range of common psychological quirks. Perception of scarcity, the herd effect, reciprocation and personalisation, all lend themselves to techniques for lead generation and marketing optimisation.

Via Robin Gurney
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Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Neuromarketing Insights
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The Secret of Neuromarketing: Go for the Pain

The Secret of Neuromarketing: Go for the Pain | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it

Recently, I visited with Christophe Morin, a French researcher with SalesBrain, which is based in San Francisco and claims to be the world's first neuromarketing agency. His title is chief pain officer.


Via Robin Gurney
Catalina Carmen Pop's insight:

“Humans are pain-avoiding machines...”

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Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it

Digital Citizenship is a suite of resources for stage 5 students to support safe online behaviour. This resource includes game-based learning, lessons, videos, and parent and teacher support materials.


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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E-commerce Perspective: Why Language Matters?

E-commerce Perspective: Why Language Matters? | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it

The importance of communication is well understood by all, and businesses invest a great amount of their time and resources to effectively communicate with prospective customers. Effective messaging has to be clear and should resonate with the target audience. Although companies have been able to effectively get their message across to the English speaking world, communication in other languages has always fallen behind due to less time being spent on localizing business messaging. This has led to unsuccessful foreign expansion by prominent brands who have continually tried to expand their reach abroad.


Is translation enough?
In an increasingly multilingual world, the need to communicate in different languages is greater than ever. Many executives consider translation to be the answer to the requirement for multilingual communication but translation is the beginning of a greater strategy aimed at a specific language group. Most companies use the Internet to engage with prospective clients, primarily through a website but some also go further and engage with web users on different social aspects online. If a company’s customer base includes another languages group, then it has to create a strategy specific to that group. There are numerous reasons why this is important:
A survey of global web users showed that 52.4% buy only at websites which present information in their language.

85.3% web users from the survey stated that having information in their own language plays a critical role in buying financial and insurance services.Web users prefer local payment methods and currency for buying purposes online.More than half of the respondents stated that they would buy from a global brand than a local one. Brand value and awareness plays a critical role in influencing buying behaviour online.

 

The above points should encourage businesses to focus upon language support and identifying the characteristics of their target markets. Foreign language web user groups have differing online behaviour and researching their habits would allow a business to develop a relevant strategy for them.

 

Complete language support

Language matters and it’s not restricted to web content only, the entire online spectrum of a business should be available for foreign language web users to peruse through. This includes online activity that extends beyond a website for e.g. social networks and online advertisement. Targeting a different segment should have a structured plan behind it in order to provide complete information and support to web users.

 

Localized support will always result in a healthy return-on-investment because web users are being effectively targeted through content that is relevant for them. The focus of companies should be to satisfy the customers’ requirements and the initial step is to provide content to them in their language and develop an on-going strategy for the foreign language web users.

 

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Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Global Brain
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A Simple Generative Model of Collective Online Behaviour

Human activities---from voter mobilization to political protests---increasingly take place in online environments, providing novel opportunities for relating individual behaviours to population-level outcomes. The recent availability of data sets that capture the behaviour of individuals participating in online social systems has driven the emerging field of computational social science, as large-scale empirical data sets enable the development of detailed computational models of individual and collective behaviour. Given the inherent limitations of observational data, it is crucial to investigate the extent to which models of collective dynamics can distinguish between different individual-level mechanisms. Here we introduce a simple generative model for the collective behaviour of millions of social networking site users who are deciding between different software applications. Our model incorporates two distinct components: one is associated with recent decisions of users, and the other reflects the cumulative popularity of each application. Importantly, although various combinations of the two mechanisms yield long-time behaviour that is consistent with data, only models that strongly emphasize recent popularity of applications over their cumulative popularity reproduce the observed temporal dynamics. Our approach demonstrates the value of even very simple generative models in understanding collective social behaviour, and it highlights the need to address temporal dynamics---not just long-time behaviour---when modelling complex social systems.

 

A Simple Generative Model of Collective Online Behaviour

James P. Gleeson, Davide Cellai, Jukka-Pekka Onnela, Mason A. Porter, Felix Reed-Tsochas

http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.7440


Via Complexity Digest, Spaceweaver
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Spaceweaver's curator insight, June 3, 2013 5:38 PM

to investigate

Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Neuromarketing Insights
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Consumer Neuroscience | Neuromarketing

According to Caroline Winnett, Chief Marketing Officer and co-founder of NeuroFocus, the problem with the term “neuromarketing” isn’t just the “neuro” part. Providers like her firm go beyond purely marketing topics and engage in product testing, brand development, technology development, and R&D. Their proposed term, “consumer neuroscience,” would both emphasize the direct measurement of brain activity and avoid the limits imposed by a marketing-only focus.


Via Robin Gurney
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Rescooped by Catalina Carmen Pop from Neuromarketing Insights
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The Psychology of Beer | Neuromarketing

The Psychology of Beer | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing - market research | Scoop.it

New research has been released showing that the shape of the glass has a huge effect on how quickly we consume beer.


Via Robin Gurney
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