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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience.
Discussion: In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research.
Summary: We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease.
Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.
Third, trust research in the medical context lacks empirical behavioral and neuroscientific evidence. Neurologists entering this field of research could profit from the extensive knowledge of the biological foundation of trust that scientists in economically-orientated neurosciences have gained.
Fourth, neurologists could contribute significantly to the ethical debate about invasive methods in neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience. Further, neurologists should investigate biological and behavioral reactions of neurological patients to marketing and advertising measures, as they could show special consumer vulnerability and be subject to target marketing.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Etude

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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Peer2Politics
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The Heretic Economist: ECONOMY FOR HERETICS: BARING THE MYTHS OF ORTHODOX ECONOMY Extract from Chapter 1 – “The Myth of consumer rationality”

The Heretic Economist: ECONOMY FOR HERETICS: BARING THE MYTHS OF ORTHODOX ECONOMY Extract from Chapter 1 – “The Myth of consumer rationality” | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

The advancement of the neurosciences and the brain sciences has not been no stranger to the economy. In fact it is because of them it has been possible inquire into the physical basis of several of the discoveries of behavioral economics, thus born a new branch for the economic study: the neuroeconomics. 


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The Basics Of Neuromarketing

The Basics Of Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

SEO is an ever-changing game--which is why online marketers are increasingly depending on neuromarketing to draw and engage new users or customers.

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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience.
Discussion: In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research.
Summary: We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease.
Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.
Third, trust research in the medical context lacks empirical behavioral and neuroscientific evidence. Neurologists entering this field of research could profit from the extensive knowledge of the biological foundation of trust that scientists in economically-orientated neurosciences have gained.
Fourth, neurologists could contribute significantly to the ethical debate about invasive methods in neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience. Further, neurologists should investigate biological and behavioral reactions of neurological patients to marketing and advertising measures, as they could show special consumer vulnerability and be subject to target marketing.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Etude

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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Social Foraging
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Reviewing Neuroscience And Ads With Neuromatters’ Barbara Hanna

Reviewing Neuroscience And Ads With Neuromatters’ Barbara Hanna | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

Those signs in the mall aren’t ready to talk to you – yet .

 

Today, when it comes to advertising, real-time insights into responses evoked at the neuro - or brain – level have only made their way into movies such as “Minority Report” (see clip) as Hollywood plays with the eerie potential of addressability. Nevertheless, last year’s acquisition of Neurofocus by Nielsen and the work of companies like Affectiva are early “mile markers” in the combination of marketing and neuroscience – a.k.a. neuromarketing.

 

For Neuromatters co-founder Barbara Hanna, who is a doctor of neuroscience, and her co-founders, they see applications across industries. Whether her company decides to go the “marketing” route remains to be seen as it is somewhat driven by the customers who arrive at their doorstep as they cobble together a range of projects unlocking the human brain’s potential and its limitations.


Via Ashish Umre
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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Tracking the Future
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'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics

'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

In their computer simulations of human evolution, scientists have discovered the emergence of the “homo socialis” with “other-regarding” preferences.

 

Economics has a beautiful body of theory. But does it describe real markets? Doubts have come up not only in the wake of the financial crisis, since financial crashes should not occur according to the then established theories. Since ages, economic theory is based on concepts such as efficient markets and the “homo economicus”, i.e. the assumption of competitively optimizing individuals and firms. It was believed that any behavior deviating from this would create disadvantages and, hence, be eliminated by natural selection. But experimental evidence from behavioral economics show that, on average, people behave more fairness-oriented and other-regarding than expected. A new theory by scientists from ETH Zurich now explains why. 


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Joe Stafura's curator insight, April 5, 2013 11:13 AM

The ability to become part of a "super- organism" is well established (Mechanical Turk, Innocentive, etc.) bit clearly immature as far as the impact on society. It creates a new set of opportunities for structuring organizations and solving massive problems that are best addressed by massive, multiple, perspectives.

 

as the richness of the remote interaction platforms and data increases there could be a leap forwars that exceeds the industrial revolutions impact.

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Sex, Lies, and Our Secret Motivators | Neuromarketing

Sex, Lies, and Our Secret Motivators | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Here's news that probably won't shock you: sex is at the top of our unconscious minds. And, when marketers ask us, we won't come close to admitting it. A fascinating new study by Young & Rubicam provides insights into what ...
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Neuromarketing Is The Fundamental Secret Of Success Andrew ...

Neuromarketing Is The Fundamental Secret Of Success Andrew ... | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Andrew Spence discusses neuromarketing and how this can help marketers achieve success.
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Names Change Behavior | Neuromarketing

Names Change Behavior | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
A new study by David Just and Brian Wansink of the Cornell Food & Brand Lab found that calling the same portion of spaghetti “double-size” instead of regular caused diners to eat less.
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Neuromarketing applied to food

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Neuromarketing: How Advertisers Are Getting Inside Our Brains

Neuromarketing has embraced advances in brain imaging and is helping businesses to build their brands by focusing on consumers' experiences of pleasure.
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Les outils du neuromarketing

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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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An introduction to Neuromarketing

An introduction to Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
How stimulating the full range of senses can affect consumer behaviour Over the Summer, when we had a hot day and I was stuck on a commuter train I kept getting a whiff of somebody’s sun cream that has that coconut smell that instantly flooded my...

Via Thomas Faltin
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Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from Social Foraging
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Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing

Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

While we think of metaphors as mainly word-based, visual metaphors can be a potent selling tool. They can both engage the brain like text metaphors and stimulate the viewer’s senses in a way that words alone may not.

 

I ran across an ad for Austin-based Elements Laser Spa that includes both a visual metaphor and a play on words. The ad shows a rose with its thorns removed, while its headline text reads, “Nice Stems.” (For international Neuromarketing readers, “stems” is slang for “legs.”)

 

This ad is brilliant in several ways. First, it produces an “aha!” reward to the viewer’s brain since most readers will understand the cryptic ad only when they look at the small print below. (The print version of this ad has a small box below the illustration that offers a discount on laser hair removal. The long-stemmed rose with the little pile of thorns won’t make sense at first, but upon seeing the text in the discount offer just about every viewer will immediately grasp what’s going on.


Via Ashish Umre
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Neuromarketing par l'image

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Tyler Evans's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:25 PM

Take a look at this advertisement (and accompanying article).  For Orwell, good writers can create fresh, enduring metaphors.  They don't rely on "stale metaphors."  Considering this idea, be sure to focus on the three qualities of metaphors, as presented in this article.  How does this literary concept translate in the world of visual art?

Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from BehaviourWorks threads
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Four Words That Double Persuasion | Neuromarketing

Four Words That Double Persuasion | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Want to double your success in persuading people to do as you ask? Four simple words, and even other phrases with the same meaning, have been shown to double the success rate in dozens of studies worldwide.

Via Neil Gains
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Persuasion 

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Gemma Gilabert's curator insight, April 8, 2014 10:03 AM

Persuasió i neuromàrketing

Rescooped by Laurene Franzon from With My Right Brain
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The 7 things you need to know about behavioral economics

The 7 things you need to know about behavioral economics | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

“Image: "Genius at work" by patries71 A lot of people in advertising are bound to have heard about behavioral economics by now – the discipline that delivers a groin kick to neo-classical economics ...”


Via Emre Erdogan
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Neuromarketing: el poder de la empatía

Neuromarketing: el poder de la empatía | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
El cerebro irracional como denominador común. [Miriam Bravo y Víctor Abarca] Conocer la parte inconsciente del comportamiento del consumidor se vuelve fundamental para la toma de decisiones.
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Important

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Will Companies One Day Use Brain Waves to Find Ideal Pricing? - Businessweek (blog)

Will Companies One Day Use Brain Waves to Find Ideal Pricing? - Businessweek (blog) | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Will Companies One Day Use Brain Waves to Find Ideal Pricing?
Businessweek (blog)
Müller's company, the Neuromarketing Labs, advertises not only NeuroPricing, but also NeuroBranding, NeuroPackaging, and more.
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Neuromarketing & price

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Why Neuromarketing Is A Neuroscam | Popular Science

Why Neuromarketing Is A Neuroscam | Popular Science | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Poor data and poorer analysis do not make true scientific results.
Laurene Franzon's insight:

La collecte des données : opinion contreversée

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Neuromarketing: Can Marketers Read Your Mind? | Graduate ...

Something happened in my brain when I watched the new Guinness ad – the wildly successful commercial that earned 3 million YouTube views in just three days. I'm not sure what it was, but by the final frame of foamy Irish ...
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Neuromarketing Threat Seems Quaint in Today's Ad Landscape ...

Maybe EthicMark would have more appeal if it embraced the dangers of outside forces tracking our very real moves to predict what we will do.
Laurene Franzon's insight:

Opinion : contre le Nmkg + lien vers vidéo

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