Neuromarketing
70 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color

The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
This seemingly simple area of study offers insights into all sorts of behavior--from attention to decision-making.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

The Basics Of Neuromarketing

The Basics Of Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

SEO is an ever-changing game--which is why online marketers are increasingly depending on neuromarketing to draw and engage new users or customers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Four Words That Double Persuasion | Neuromarketing

Four Words That Double Persuasion | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Want to double your success in persuading people to do as you ask? Four simple words, and even other phrases with the same meaning, have been shown to double the success rate in dozens of studies worldwide.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Franzon from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Reviewing Neuroscience And Ads With Neuromatters’ Barbara Hanna

Reviewing Neuroscience And Ads With Neuromatters’ Barbara Hanna | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

Those signs in the mall aren’t ready to talk to you – yet .

 

Today, when it comes to advertising, real-time insights into responses evoked at the neuro - or brain – level have only made their way into movies such as “Minority Report” (see clip) as Hollywood plays with the eerie potential of addressability. Nevertheless, last year’s acquisition of Neurofocus by Nielsen and the work of companies like Affectiva are early “mile markers” in the combination of marketing and neuroscience – a.k.a. neuromarketing.

 

For Neuromatters co-founder Barbara Hanna, who is a doctor of neuroscience, and her co-founders, they see applications across industries. Whether her company decides to go the “marketing” route remains to be seen as it is somewhat driven by the customers who arrive at their doorstep as they cobble together a range of projects unlocking the human brain’s potential and its limitations.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Franzon from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience.
Discussion: In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research.
Summary: We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease.
Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.
Third, trust research in the medical context lacks empirical behavioral and neuroscientific evidence. Neurologists entering this field of research could profit from the extensive knowledge of the biological foundation of trust that scientists in economically-orientated neurosciences have gained.
Fourth, neurologists could contribute significantly to the ethical debate about invasive methods in neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience. Further, neurologists should investigate biological and behavioral reactions of neurological patients to marketing and advertising measures, as they could show special consumer vulnerability and be subject to target marketing.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
more...
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Why Neuromarketing Is A Neuroscam | Popular Science

Why Neuromarketing Is A Neuroscam | Popular Science | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Poor data and poorer analysis do not make true scientific results.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Neuromarketing: Can Marketers Read Your Mind? | Graduate ...

Something happened in my brain when I watched the new Guinness ad – the wildly successful commercial that earned 3 million YouTube views in just three days. I'm not sure what it was, but by the final frame of foamy Irish ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Neuromarketing Threat Seems Quaint in Today's Ad Landscape ...

Maybe EthicMark would have more appeal if it embraced the dangers of outside forces tracking our very real moves to predict what we will do.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Is Starbucks Coffee Actually Too Cheap? - Investorplace.com

Is Starbucks Coffee Actually Too Cheap? - Investorplace.com | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Is Starbucks Coffee Actually Too Cheap?
Investorplace.com
The provocative notion that we're not paying enough for a cup of java comes from scientist Kai-Markus Müller of Stuttgart-based The Neuromarketing Labs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

An introduction to Neuromarketing - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice

An introduction to Neuromarketing - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
How stimulating the full range of senses can affect consumer behaviour Over the Summer, when we had a hot day and I was stuck on a commuter train I kept ge. Marketing topic(s):Persuasion-marketing-principles.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Franzon from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

A New Member Of The Family: The GRIT Consumer Participation in Research Report Is Here!

A New Member Of The Family: The GRIT Consumer Participation in Research Report Is Here! | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Respondents are the lifeblood of market research. Whether it’s qual or quant, surveys or communities, neuromarketing or ‘Big Data’ and everything in between knowing how to reach, engage, and understand people is the very bedrock of insights.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Learning to Learn: fighting cognitive biases

Learning to Learn: fighting cognitive biases | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is an increasingly important skill that has been overlooked by many as information becomes more accessible and superfluous.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Sex, Lies, and Our Secret Motivators | Neuromarketing

Sex, Lies, and Our Secret Motivators | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Here's news that probably won't shock you: sex is at the top of our unconscious minds. And, when marketers ask us, we won't come close to admitting it. A fascinating new study by Young & Rubicam provides insights into what ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Franzon from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing

Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

While we think of metaphors as mainly word-based, visual metaphors can be a potent selling tool. They can both engage the brain like text metaphors and stimulate the viewer’s senses in a way that words alone may not.

 

I ran across an ad for Austin-based Elements Laser Spa that includes both a visual metaphor and a play on words. The ad shows a rose with its thorns removed, while its headline text reads, “Nice Stems.” (For international Neuromarketing readers, “stems” is slang for “legs.”)

 

This ad is brilliant in several ways. First, it produces an “aha!” reward to the viewer’s brain since most readers will understand the cryptic ad only when they look at the small print below. (The print version of this ad has a small box below the illustration that offers a discount on laser hair removal. The long-stemmed rose with the little pile of thorns won’t make sense at first, but upon seeing the text in the discount offer just about every viewer will immediately grasp what’s going on.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
Tyler Evans's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:25 PM

Take a look at this advertisement (and accompanying article).  For Orwell, good writers can create fresh, enduring metaphors.  They don't rely on "stale metaphors."  Considering this idea, be sure to focus on the three qualities of metaphors, as presented in this article.  How does this literary concept translate in the world of visual art?

Laurene Franzon's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:51 PM

Neuromarketing par l'image

Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Neuromarketing Is The Fundamental Secret Of Success Andrew ...

Neuromarketing Is The Fundamental Secret Of Success Andrew ... | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Andrew Spence discusses neuromarketing and how this can help marketers achieve success.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Franzon from #HR #RRHH Making love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

#Neuromarketing : El Poder de la Empatía

#Neuromarketing : El Poder de la Empatía | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it

[Miriam Bravo y Víctor Abarca] Conocer la parte inconsciente del comportamiento del consumidor se vuelve fundamental para la toma de decisiones. Aquí la neurociencia y neurocomunicación encuentran su vínculo con el marketing. Olivier Ourllier, investigador en neurociencia y que expuso este campo ante el Parlamento francés, define el neuromarketing como “la utilización de técnicas de neurociencia con técnicas clásicas del marketing y su objetivo es ver como el cerebro reacciona ante algo nuevo, por ejemplo productos, campañas publicitarias o avances de películas”. El neuromarketing pretende dar respuestas a preguntas formuladas directamente al cerebro y que éste responda a través de ondas cerebrales: el sistema límbico.

Mediante la resonancia magnética, la neurociencia puede diseccionar cada parte del cerebro para conocer el comportamiento, ver la presión sanguínea o la carga de oxígeno en cada parte del cerebro a la hora de recibir ciertos estímulos. Experimentos como estos se llevan a cabo por empresas privadas.

Así ocurre con Gemma Calvert, cofundadora de Neurosense y profesora de la Universidad de Warwich, que explica los distintos tipos de escáneres utilizados. Se ha llegado a esta nueva disciplina a través de numerosas técnicas como pueden ser el SST, la psicofísica, el uso de escáneres fMRI, los niveles biométricos, la técnica del eye-tracking y la comunicación.

El estudio del comportamiento pasa por las encuestas, los centros de opinión y finalmente a las técnicas de la neurociencia, disciplina que aporta un nuevo punto de vista a los estudios de marketing y de comunicación. Gracias a estos recursos sabemos lo que el receptor piensa y desea en realidad, datos que hasta entonces no se podían conocer con los métodos anteriores.

Debido a las técnicas mencionadas, la neurociencia ha aportado a la comunicación y al marketing estudios que arrojan luz sobre el inconsciente del receptor, un ámbito que hasta ahora desconocido. Estos estudios han demostrado su importancia y lo decisivo que puede llegar a ser en cualquier respuesta del receptor, ya sea a modo de decisión de compra o en el contexto de la comunicación. Según Sergio Monge y Vanesa Fernández (2011) “el 95% de los pensamientos, las emociones y el aprendizaje se producen a nivel inconsciente”. Por este motivo, no podemos asilarlo o dejar de tenerlo en cuenta en los posteriores estudios de marketing que se vayan realizando.

El neuromarketing es la aplicación directa de estos estudios sobre neurocomunicación como necesidad de poder conocer las preferencias de los consumidores. En el momento en el que las empresas empiezan a producir en masa, a manufacturar sus productos y a venderlos, ven la necesidad de encontrar nuevos clientes. La mejor forma para ello era a través de la comunicación: dar a conocer los productos a la población esperando que estos se convirtieran en clientes.

Durante este tiempo, y mientras el crecimiento fue mayor (años 60 en Estados Unidos) las encuestas y los focus group se volvieron una técnica cogida de la sociología para saber qué quería el consumidor. Pero el elevado número de productos lanzados anualmente y que fracasan en el mercado dejaba ver que había un problema en estas técnicas: dependen de lo que el usuario quiera decir en las encuestas, y el poder de influencia  que tenga un sujeto en el focus group.

La evolución de estas técnicas deriva en la neurociencia: la capacidad de obtener respuestas totalmente irracionales. De esta forma, se podrá lograr una mayor eficacia en la transmisión del mensaje si sabemos el modo en que impactará realmente. Ha quedado demostrado que las investigaciones en las que se implica al consumidor (encuestas, focus groups, etc.), no suelen dar resultados tan fiables como deberían.

Esto se debe a una falta de información provocada por no tener en cuenta el inconsciente. Por otro lado, no siempre la información que nos den los consumidores será del todo cierta, ya que está demostrado que el ser humano, al enfrentarse a este tipo de situaciones opta, en un gran número de los casos, por las respuestas estereotipadas o que alcanzan un mayor grado de deseabilidad social, y no son por tanto un reflejo fiel de sus gustos reales.

Desde la psicología y la sociología se ha visto la importancia que tienen las emociones frente al raciocinio a la hora de comprar. Si el 85% de las veces actuamos de forma irracional, a través del tálamo, se debería tener en cuenta estas respuestas a la hora de poder decodificar qué piensa “realmente” el usuario a la hora de ver un anuncio, escuchar una canción o ver una imagen.

Neuromarketing y empatía.

El marketing destina importantes sumas de dinero en lanzar productos, servicios y anuncios que los promocionen. Sin embargo, más del 90% de los productos que se lanzan anualmente al mercado fracasan a pesar de estar respaldados por cuestionarios y focus group.

Estas técnicas, empleadas habitualmente en la sociología y que luego tomaron las ciencias de la comunicación, se basan en lo que el usuario o sujeto de estudio quiere decir. Ello implica que es necesaria una proactividad por parte del usuario de estudio.

“El neuromarketing puede definirse como una disciplina avanzada, que investiga y estudia los procesos cerebrales que explican la conducta y la toma de decisiones de las personas en los campos de acción del marketing tradicional: inteligencia de mercado, diseño de productos y servicios, comunicaciones, precios, branding, posicionamiento, targeting, canales y ventas” Braidot (2009).

Una persona está expuesta a lo largo de su vida a más de 2.000.000 de anuncios, lo cual supone una media de 8 horas de anuncios televisivos, 5 días en semana durante 6 años, según los estudios de Martin Lindstrom.

Saber qué anuncios se recordarán y cuales no resulta fundamental a la hora de saber cómo debe gastar el dinero el departamento de Marketing de una empresa.

La parte irracional del cerebro, es decir, las emociones, no se habían tenido en cuenta anteriormente por los directores de Marketing, dado lo difícil que es medir semejante componente. No obstante, mediante el electroencefalograma es posible obtener miles de puntos de referencia que miden básicamente tres aspectos:

Atención: es la más fácil de capturar mediante esta técnica y ha sido definida anteriormente.

Recuerdo: una de las referencias más estudiadas, ya que esta hará que la marca se recuerde lo suficiente como para ser elegida por el usuario en el momento de compra. Según estos estudios, se demostró que los anuncios que dejaban la marca para el final eran más fácilmente recordados. También se descubrió que había una relación entre los anuncios recordados y las ondas neuronales que se producían mientras se veía. El cerebro elige en el momento del visionado qué cosas recordará y cuáles no.

Emoción: es la que más suele variar a lo largo de un anuncio, algo positivo ya que los sujetos no pueden estar expuestos durante mucho tiempo a emociones intensas.

Cuando la persona ha procesado el mensaje y ha percibido que es coherente con su ideario, es cuando estamos más cerca de la acción de compra. Para  que dicha acción se convierta en algo prácticamente seguro, necesitamos un nuevo componente, la empatía, que según Sánchez (2009), tiene un doble interés, ya que “por una parte encontramos los beneficios derivados de un conocimiento veraz e intuitivo de la intencionalidad, la bondad y el fundamento intrínseco subyacente a los mensajes, y por otra, el poder vinculante que ejerce sobre los procesos de toma de decisión”.

Midiendo estas tres características básicas, atención, recuerdo y emoción, se puede extraer la afectividad, característica final a la hora de sentir empatía por una marca. Existen ciertos estudios relacionados con el neuromarketing que aportan gran valor e importancia a la empatía debido a que tiene una relación directa con la atención selectiva. Pero para explicar cómo nos ayuda la neurociencia a conseguirla, debemos sentar en primer lugar unas bases esenciales.

Durante mucho tiempo se ha buscado por parte de los comerciantes el botón o mejor estrategia para impulsar a la compra, pero el hecho de recordar los anuncios, o sentir una afectividad por esa marca no significa que la compra se vaya a realizar

Martin Lindstrom, autor de Buyology, pudo ver a través de unos estudios de neurociencia que los mensajes preventivos del tipo “fumar mata”, que aparecen en las cajetillas de tabaco no funcionan, al igual que tampoco lo hacen los anuncios con contenido sexual.

En el primer caso, el de los anuncios preventivos, realizó mediante un escáner fMRI cómo reaccionaban los sujetos a estos anuncios, y la progresión que estos hacían, y comprobó como la gente se volvía inmune a estos anuncios. Es más, al igual que Paulov, el público asociaba estos desagradables anuncios con el bienestar producido por el tabaco. El núcleo accumbens del fumador activa su zona adictiva incluso al ver estos anuncios. Como solución, Lindstrom propuso eliminar estos vínculos del efecto Paulov, cambiando rápidamente el formato de los anuncios y de las cajetillas para eliminar la sensación de bienestar quitando los vínculos.

En cuanto al sexo en los anuncios, vio que no eran en absoluto buenos para una marca. Los impulsos de este tipo ocupan demasiado espacio en el cerebro y terminan por anular la atención a la marca publicitada, además de ser una materia muy accesible en Internet y que sólo queda como algo anecdótico en la mente de los usuarios.

Dentro de la neurociencia, hay dos corrientes. La primera hace más hincapié en la complejidad del cerebro y la segunda, al contrario, en su simplicidad. Esta última es la desarrollada por Sales Brain, empresa de neuromarketing que afirma que existe un botón de compra en la mente de los clientes, un botón que agiliza la toma de decisiones. Para ello, se basan en una teoría de los años 60: el cerebro está formado por tres capas. La primera, que supondría ser el cerebro reptil o arcaico, tiene 450 millones de años y es la parte irracional, situada en el sistema límbico (parte superior del encéfalo).

En segundo lugar estaría la capa relacionada con el comportamiento y, finalmente, en la tercera capa el neurocórtex se encargaría del pensamiento abstracto y el lenguaje.

La corriente adversa a esta sostiene que estas averiguaciones son falsas teorías ya que el cerebro es uno de los órganos más complejos, por lo que reducir la decisión de compra a un “botón” sería absurdo. Además dice que la venta a través del neuromarketing no es posible, ya que influyen otras muchas variables, y que el cerebro no puede ser manipulado tan fácilmente.

No se puede hacer un anuncio tan exacto que pueda activar el sistema límbico e incitar automáticamente a la compra; por lo tanto, estas teorías estarían sobreestimadas y necesitan ser revisadas.

La ética en la neurociencia

Después de ver ambas corrientes, lo que sí parece evidente es que la neurociencia no puede manipular de forma exacta el comportamiento del consumidor, pero sí puede ayudar a entender el comportamiento del consumidor, y de ese modo nos permite mejorar las técnicas de comunicación y venta para conseguir la conversión.

La neurociencia en sí sólo mide, no crea nuevos anuncios. Plantear el cerebro desde un punto de vista tan simplista sería demagógico. Sí es cierto que se está demostrando que la neurociencia podrá ayudar al marketing a la hora de realizar anuncios más persuasivos ya que dichas técnicas se están utilizando, por ejemplo, para hacer pretest o elegir los planos que más pueden llegar a influir en el consumidor.

La ciencia avanza a un ritmo muy veloz y el control humano es insaciable, por lo que los gobiernos deberían poner normas al respecto. De momento no se han sobrepasado los límites por ser un campo tan novedoso, pero esto no será así siempre. Actualmente, estas investigaciones se están adaptando a los principios éticos de la investigación de mercados, pero es muy probable que en un periodo de tiempo no muy amplio estas directrices se queden cortas ante el nivel de acceso a información que pueda revelar la neurociencia.

De hecho, un profesor de la universidad de Pitsburg, Marcel Just, especializado en el área del lenguaje centrado en el autismo, ha desarrollado junto con su equipo un software capaz de anticiparse a las respuestas de un sujeto mediante unas técnicas basadas en las frecuencias electromagnéticas. El sujeto piensa en algo e inmediatamente un ordenador consigue descodificarla. Esto ha llevado al profesor Just a la afirmación de que un mayor desarrollo científico conlleva una mayor capacidad de manipulación.

Bibliografía

- Libros

Lindstrom, M. (2009) Buyology, Londres, Random House Business Books.

Braidot, N. (2005). Neuromarketing. Neuroeconomia y Negocios. Buenos Aires, Biblioteca Braidot.

Braidot, N. (2009) Neuromarketing, Barcelona, Ediciones Gestión 2000.

Salmon, C. (2010) Storytelling: la máquina de fabrica historias y formatear las mentes, Barcelona, Ediciones Península.

Goleman, D. (2010) Inteligencia Emocional, Barcelona, Editorial Kairós, S.A.

-Artículos

Vera, C. “Generación de impacto en la publicidad exterior a través del uso de principios del neuromarketing visual”. Telos. Mayo-Agosto 2010. Vol. 12-2 pg. 155-174.

Sánchez, J. C. “La rehabilitación neurocientífica de la empatía y sus implicaciones en los ámbitos de la comunicación”. Estudios sobre el mensaje periodístico. Junio 2009. Vol. 15 pg. 455-476.

Ciprian-Marcel, P.; Lăcrămioara, R.; Ioana, M. A.; et al. “Neuromarketing. Getting inside the costumer’s mind”.

Braidot, N. “Neuromarketing aplicado”. Extraído de http://www.braidot.com/e-papers.php. Consultado el 12/02/2012.

Arussy, L. “Neuromarketing isn’t marketing”. Customer relationship magnement. Enero 2009. Pg. 12.

Baptista, M. V.; Fátima, M.; Mora, C. “Neuromarketing: conocer al cliente por sus percepciones”. Tec Empresarial. Noviembre 2010. Vol. 4-3 pg. 9-19.

Lee, N.; Butler, M.; Senior, C. “The brain in business: neuromarketing and organisational
cognitive neuroscience”. Der Markt. 2010. Vol. 49 pg. 129-131.

Boricean, V. “Brief history of neuromarketing”. The International Conference on Administration and Business. Noviembre 2009.

Olamendi, G. (2007); “Neuromarketing”. Extraído de www.estoesmarketing.es. Consultado el 11/02/2012.

 

Timoteo, J. “Neurocomunicación. Propuesta para una revisión de los fundamentos teóricos de la comunicación y sus aplicaciones industriales y sociales”. Mediaciones sociales. Julio-Diciembre 2007. Vol. 1 pg. 355-386.

 

Monge, J.; Fernández, V. “Neuromarketing: tecnología, mercado y retos”. Pensar la publicidad. 2011. Vol. 5-2 pg. 19-42.

 

Serrano, N.; de Balanzó, C. “Neurociencias y estrategia publicitaria: redefiniendo el rol del incosciente”. Trípodos. 2011. Vol. 28 pg. 35-50.


- Vídeos

Calvert, G “Neuroimaging: Brainwaves for Marketers” Universidad de Warwick, 17/03/2010#

Williams, S “Advances in applied neuroimaging” Universidad de Warwick, 17/03/2010#

Serfaty, L “Seducir al consumidor – Neuromarketing” Altomedia, 2010


Via jose antonio gabelas, AlexaSocialMedia - Social Media & Community Management, Jesús Hernández, Ricard Lloria
more...
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Names Change Behavior | Neuromarketing

Names Change Behavior | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
A new study by David Just and Brian Wansink of the Cornell Food & Brand Lab found that calling the same portion of spaghetti “double-size” instead of regular caused diners to eat less.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Neuromarketing: How Advertisers Are Getting Inside Our Brains

Neuromarketing has embraced advances in brain imaging and is helping businesses to build their brands by focusing on consumers' experiences of pleasure.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Marketing 3.0: Touching the Soul of Consumers! - User Experience

Marketing 3.0: Touching the Soul of Consumers! - User Experience | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
I have been hearing a lot about changes happening in 'marketing' and all my friends and colleagues who are working in marketing organizations and creative agencies have been telling me the stories about what changes they have ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

Don’t Make This Social Proof Mistake | Neuromarketing

Don’t Make This Social Proof Mistake | Neuromarketing | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
Every marketer knows that social proof – showing that other people use your product, support your cause, etc. – is a powerful persuasion tool.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

The 21 New Rules of Content Marketing [INFOGRAP...

The 21 New Rules of Content Marketing [INFOGRAP... | Neuromarketing | Scoop.it
"In this new world of Internet marketing, it's not about being "optimized," but being "easy to find." That sounds like a subtle difference, but it couldn't be more profound.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Franzon
Scoop.it!

33 Lessons in Neuromarketing

An exploration of neuromarketing, psychology and simply brilliant quotes from Jonah Lehrer's How We Decide, Roger Dooley's Brainfluence, and Marketing Lindstrom (Gute Slideshow über #Neuromarketing http://t.co/16j5e4VSS4)...
more...
No comment yet.