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Executive Functioning | Executive Function Disorder - NCLD

Executive Functioning | Executive Function Disorder - NCLD | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
What is executive function? Learn about this learning disorder that causes difficulty with planning projects, memorizing or retaining information.
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Neurological Disorders
Descriptions, research, diagnosis neurodegenerative disorders
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Fighting Back Against #Cognitive #Aging (#Mindmapping to Exercise the Brain and Organize Thinking)

Fighting Back Against #Cognitive #Aging (#Mindmapping to Exercise the Brain and Organize Thinking) | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
As is said (albeit in a quite different context) "use it or lose it." You age and people tell you to start do crossword puzzles (I've never liked them) or to do simple arithmetic on an iPad (hhmmm....
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Are Tablets the Way Out of Child Illiteracy? - Smithsonian

Are Tablets the Way Out of Child Illiteracy?
Smithsonian
This got Robin Morris, a neuropsychology researcher at Georgia State, thinking about his own backyard.
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Weighing On Your Mind? Obesity, Cognition and Dementia | Brain Blogger

Weighing On Your Mind? Obesity, Cognition and Dementia | Brain Blogger | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it

Obesity in mid-life is associated with a higher risk of dementia- including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) – later in life. Though age is still the primary risk factor for dementia, lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical activity may play an important role in the onset of cognitive impairment and dementia. Now, weight loss surgery is showing benefits in cognitive decline.

Evidence has connected obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and increased blood glucose levels – collectively known as metabolic syndrome – to the onset of dementia even decades down the road. The connection is complicated and still unclear, but there is hope that shared signaling pathways may be a therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and certain types of dementia. Diabetes mellitus, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle are also associated with an increased risk of dementia.

Recently, several studies linked weight loss after bariatric surgery to improved cognitive function; the results are being extrapolated to offer hope for dementia prevention and treatment.

One study evaluated the brain functions of 17 obese women before and 24 weeks after gastric bypass surgery. The brain functions of 16 normal-weight women were also evaluated as controls. Before surgery, the obese women showed higher metabolic activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus – an area of the brain already implicated in the pathology of dementia. This extra metabolic activity was not present after surgery and the post-surgery levels of activity were not different than those of the lean women. After surgery, the obese women also showed improvements in executive functions such as planning, organizing, and strategizing. The authors claim that the evidence suggests that, in obesity, the brain must work harder to achieve the same level of cognition as in an individual of healthy weight.

Another study evaluated 78 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. One year after surgery, cognitive function was markedly improved. This improved cognition was associated with improved liver function, as well, suggesting that liver function impacts cognition in obese patients. A similar study of 50 post-bariatric surgery patients revealed that cognitive improvements were maintained 3 years after surgery.

The impacts of weight loss without surgery on dementia are not as clear. In several cases, low body mass index or weight loss in the early stages of cognitive impairment actually led to worse outcomes and faster disease progression.

Approximately 66 million people are expected to have dementia by 2030 and the condition will continue to impose social, psychological, and financial burdens on families and society. But, together, these new findings are offering glimpses into the pathways of disease progression and future therapeutic targets for dementia. For now, we can just add cognitive decline and dementia to the already long list of complications associated with poor lifestyle choices.

Maintaining a healthy body weight as young as 30 years old may offer the best protection against cognitive decline, but, for those who are obese at the onset of cognitive decline, weight loss surgery may offer cognitive improvement in addition to the obvious physical improvements.

References

Alosco ML, Galioto R, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). Cognitive function after bariatric surgery: evidence for improvement 3 years after surgery.American journal of surgery, 207 (6), 870-6 PMID: 24119892

Alosco ML, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). The effects of cystatin C and alkaline phosphatase changes on cognitive function 12-months after bariatric surgery. Journal of the neurological sciences PMID: 25073570

Anstey KJ, Kingston A, Kiely KM, Luszcz MA, Mitchell P, & Jagger C (2014). The influence of smoking, sedentary lifestyle and obesity on cognitive impairment-free life expectancy. International journal of epidemiology PMID: 25150976

Besser LM, Gill DP, Monsell SE, Brenowitz W, Meranus DH, Kukull W, & Gustafson DR (2014). Body mass index, weight change, and clinical progression in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer disease and associated disorders, 28 (1), 36-43 PMID: 24126214

Emmerzaal TL, Kiliaan AJ, & Gustafson DR (2014). 2003-2013: A Decade of Body Mass Index, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Dementia. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25147111

Marques EL, Halpern A, Corrêa Mancini M, de Melo ME, Horie NC, Buchpiguel CA, Martins Novaes Coutinho A, Ono CR, Prando S, Santo MA, Cunha-Neto E, Fuentes D, & Cercato C (2014). Changes in Neuropsychological Tests and Brain Metabolism After Bariatric Surgery. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism PMID: 25157409

Meng XF, Yu JT, Wang HF, Tan MS, Wang C, Tan CC, & Tan L (2014). Midlife Vascular Risk Factors and the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25024338

Ríos JA, Cisternas P, Arrese M, Barja S, & Inestrosa NC (2014). Is Alzheimer’s disease related to metabolic syndrome? A Wnt signaling conundrum. Progress in neurobiology PMID: 25084549

Rizzi L, Rosset I, & Roriz-Cruz M (2014). Global epidemiology of dementia: Alzheimer’s and vascular types. BioMed research international, 2014 PMID: 25089278

Wotton CJ, & Goldacre MJ (2014). Age at obesity and association with subsequent dementia: record linkage study. Postgraduate medical journal PMID: 25143590

Image via Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.



Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 21, 6:58 PM

Obesity in mid-life is associated with a higher risk of dementia- including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) – later in life. Though age is still the primary risk factor for dementia, lifestyle factors such as nutrition and physical activity may play an important role in the onset of cognitive impairment and dementia. Now, weight loss surgery is showing benefits in cognitive decline.

Evidence has connected obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and increased blood glucose levels – collectively known as metabolic syndrome – to the onset of dementia even decades down the road. The connection is complicated and still unclear, but there is hope that shared signaling pathways may be a therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and certain types of dementia. Diabetes mellitus, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle are also associated with an increased risk of dementia.

Recently, several studies linked weight loss after bariatric surgery to improved cognitive function; the results are being extrapolated to offer hope for dementia prevention and treatment.

One study evaluated the brain functions of 17 obese women before and 24 weeks after gastric bypass surgery. The brain functions of 16 normal-weight women were also evaluated as controls. Before surgery, the obese women showed higher metabolic activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus – an area of the brain already implicated in the pathology of dementia. This extra metabolic activity was not present after surgery and the post-surgery levels of activity were not different than those of the lean women. After surgery, the obese women also showed improvements in executive functions such as planning, organizing, and strategizing. The authors claim that the evidence suggests that, in obesity, the brain must work harder to achieve the same level of cognition as in an individual of healthy weight.

Another study evaluated 78 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. One year after surgery, cognitive function was markedly improved. This improved cognition was associated with improved liver function, as well, suggesting that liver function impacts cognition in obese patients. A similar study of 50 post-bariatric surgery patients revealed that cognitive improvements were maintained 3 years after surgery.

The impacts of weight loss without surgery on dementia are not as clear. In several cases, low body mass index or weight loss in the early stages of cognitive impairment actually led to worse outcomes and faster disease progression.

Approximately 66 million people are expected to have dementia by 2030 and the condition will continue to impose social, psychological, and financial burdens on families and society. But, together, these new findings are offering glimpses into the pathways of disease progression and future therapeutic targets for dementia. For now, we can just add cognitive decline and dementia to the already long list of complications associated with poor lifestyle choices.

Maintaining a healthy body weight as young as 30 years old may offer the best protection against cognitive decline, but, for those who are obese at the onset of cognitive decline, weight loss surgery may offer cognitive improvement in addition to the obvious physical improvements.

References

Alosco ML, Galioto R, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). Cognitive function after bariatric surgery: evidence for improvement 3 years after surgery.American journal of surgery, 207 (6), 870-6 PMID: 24119892

Alosco ML, Spitznagel MB, Strain G, Devlin M, Cohen R, Crosby RD, Mitchell JE, & Gunstad J (2014). The effects of cystatin C and alkaline phosphatase changes on cognitive function 12-months after bariatric surgery. Journal of the neurological sciences PMID: 25073570

Anstey KJ, Kingston A, Kiely KM, Luszcz MA, Mitchell P, & Jagger C (2014). The influence of smoking, sedentary lifestyle and obesity on cognitive impairment-free life expectancy. International journal of epidemiology PMID: 25150976

Besser LM, Gill DP, Monsell SE, Brenowitz W, Meranus DH, Kukull W, & Gustafson DR (2014). Body mass index, weight change, and clinical progression in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer disease and associated disorders, 28 (1), 36-43 PMID: 24126214

Emmerzaal TL, Kiliaan AJ, & Gustafson DR (2014). 2003-2013: A Decade of Body Mass Index, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Dementia. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25147111

Marques EL, Halpern A, Corrêa Mancini M, de Melo ME, Horie NC, Buchpiguel CA, Martins Novaes Coutinho A, Ono CR, Prando S, Santo MA, Cunha-Neto E, Fuentes D, & Cercato C (2014). Changes in Neuropsychological Tests and Brain Metabolism After Bariatric Surgery. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism PMID: 25157409

Meng XF, Yu JT, Wang HF, Tan MS, Wang C, Tan CC, & Tan L (2014). Midlife Vascular Risk Factors and the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD PMID: 25024338

Ríos JA, Cisternas P, Arrese M, Barja S, & Inestrosa NC (2014). Is Alzheimer’s disease related to metabolic syndrome? A Wnt signaling conundrum. Progress in neurobiology PMID: 25084549

Rizzi L, Rosset I, & Roriz-Cruz M (2014). Global epidemiology of dementia: Alzheimer’s and vascular types. BioMed research international, 2014 PMID: 25089278

Wotton CJ, & Goldacre MJ (2014). Age at obesity and association with subsequent dementia: record linkage study. Postgraduate medical journal PMID: 25143590

Image via Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.


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Sandy Williams Spencer's curator insight, September 22, 10:53 AM

Interesting data, we should all take note and lose a few pounds.

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Huntington's disease is a four-repeat tauopathy with... [Nat Med. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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AC/DC's Malcolm Young being treated for dementia - Las Vegas Review-Journal

I Know Today
AC/DC's Malcolm Young being treated for dementia
Las Vegas Review-Journal
AC/DC's Malcolm Young is reportedly in a full-time care facility in Sydney following a dementia diagnosis.
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What is frontotemporal dementia, and is it inheritable? - Boston Globe

What is frontotemporal dementia, and is it inheritable? - Boston Globe | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
What is frontotemporal dementia, and is it inheritable?
Boston Globe
A.
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'Senior Moments' Could Be Early Signs of Dementia: Study - TIME

'Senior Moments' Could Be Early Signs of Dementia: Study - TIME | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
CBS News 'Senior Moments' Could Be Early Signs of Dementia: Study TIME The study, published in the journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggests that self-reported worries about memory lapses are strong predictors of a later diagnosis of...
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Dementia, Accessibility and Defibrillators - New York Times

Dementia, Accessibility and Defibrillators - New York Times | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
New York Times
Dementia, Accessibility and Defibrillators
New York Times
A rent-stabilized tenant who suffers from dementia wanders the halls ringing everyone's doorbell starting at 4 a.m.
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Your brain waves could reveal what you forgot (or lied about) - CNET

Your brain waves could reveal what you forgot (or lied about) - CNET | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Your brain waves could reveal what you forgot (or lied about)
CNET
The study examined 24 subjects using the Concealed Information Test (CIT), a recognition test that examines whether a subject recognizes crime-relevant information.
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Treatment of and Research on Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Footage of the 2012 Stanford & APDA Atypical Parkinsonism Symposium at the Crowne Plaza SFO in Burlingame, California on October 13, 2012. Video footage was ...
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Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Dementia Recovery

Dr. Lonnie Herman reviews what causes Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Dementia. You can recover from neurodegenerative disorders when you integrate safe and eff...
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Comment on Harnessing the Power of the World-Wide #SocialBrain: A #MindMap by iNotes4You

Comment on Harnessing the Power of the World-Wide #SocialBrain: A #MindMap by iNotes4You | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Thanks for this great map.
The ’5 Necessary Conditions’ is my favorite topic and I missed it when moderating a 90k member community on Google+.
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Accessing Scientific Information about Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, Art, Creativity: A #MindMap

Accessing Scientific Information about Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, Art, Creativity: A #MindMap | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Recently I have had a number of discussions with Tony Buzan (@Tony_Buzan) about how the relationships between art and creativity and dementia support the conclusion that mind mapping may be useful in helping those with cognitive impairment.
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Psychiatry, Mental Illness, and the State - The Federalist

Psychiatry, Mental Illness, and the State - The Federalist | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
The Federalist
Psychiatry, Mental Illness, and the State
The Federalist
Finally, we have a definitive discussion of the discipline of psychiatry, from an insider committed to the profession but who does not shy away from its profound difficulties.
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41 Neuroscience Terms Every Teacher Should Know

41 Neuroscience Terms Every Teacher Should Know | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it

"As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change. The human brain. But neuroscience isn’t exactly accessible to most educators, rarely published, and when it is, it’s often full of odd phrasing and intimidating jargon. Worse, there seems to be a disconnect between the dry science of neurology, and the need teachers have for relevant tools, resources, and strategies in the classroom. Judy Willis, teacher, neuroscientist, and consultant has put together an A-Z glossary of relevant neuroscience terms for teachers and administrators to help clarify the jargon." | by Judy Willis


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Neurology: The Next Frontier in Telehealth? - Healthcare Informatics

Neurology: The Next Frontier in Telehealth? - Healthcare Informatics | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Healthcare Informatics
Neurology: The Next Frontier in Telehealth?
Healthcare Informatics
Miles E. Drake, M.D., professor emeritus of psychology and neurology at the Ohio State University, has a long history with telehealth.
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Netherlands 2013 euthanasia report – 15% increase, euthanasia for psychiatric problems and dementia | NRL News Today

Netherlands 2013 euthanasia report – 15% increase, euthanasia for psychiatric problems and dementia | NRL News Today | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it

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Modeling Shockwaves Through the Brain

Modeling Shockwaves Through the Brain | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Researchers develop a new scaling law which predicts a human's risk of blast-related TBI, based on previous studies of blast injuries on animal brains.
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What is the Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia ...

What is the Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia ... | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
There is great confusion about the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's.
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People Who Complain of Facing Memory Issues are at Risk of Dementia - Headlines & Global News

People Who Complain of Facing Memory Issues are at Risk of Dementia - Headlines & Global News | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Headlines & Global News People Who Complain of Facing Memory Issues are at Risk of Dementia Headlines & Global News "What's notable about our study is the time it took for the transition from self-reported memory complaint to dementia or clinical...
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A Doctor Unlocks Mysteries Of The Brain By Talking And Watching - NPR (blog)

A Doctor Unlocks Mysteries Of The Brain By Talking And Watching - NPR (blog) | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
NPR (blog)
A Doctor Unlocks Mysteries Of The Brain By Talking And Watching
NPR (blog)
This reliance on bedside observation and conversation is what makes neurology such a remarkable specialty, Ropper says.
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Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias | Neuropsychological ...

While NFTs and SPs are characteristic of AD, they are not pathognomic, as they occur in multiple other neurodegenerative diseases such as progressive supranuclear palsy and dementia pugilistica, which will be .....
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neuropathology blog: Nobel Laureate Prusiner Tells His Story

neuropathology blog: Nobel Laureate Prusiner Tells His Story | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Prions, by subverting the brain's own proteins, may play a crucial role in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurodegenerative diseases—and perhaps afford a clue to their prevention. Madness and Memory is the story of ...
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Harnessing the Power of the World-Wide #SocialBrain: A #MindMap

Harnessing the Power of the World-Wide #SocialBrain: A #MindMap | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Click image to expand.
 
Imagine what is happening as these billions of people discuss universal human rights, diversity, disparity, and the material versus the spiritual. Keep those servers running.
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Missing Scientific Link Between Organic #MindMapping and Help for Cognitively Impaired Individuals (Think I Found IT)

Missing Scientific Link Between Organic #MindMapping and Help for Cognitively Impaired Individuals (Think I Found IT) | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Aaahh … “hard science double-blind” research designs.
How do you apply such a design to determine if visual thinking-art therapy-visual cognitive remapping strategies help those who live with cognitive impairment?
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Comment on Hypothesis: #OrganicMindMap = Art + Plus (for those with cognitive impairment/dementia) by pixiejan

Comment on Hypothesis: #OrganicMindMap = Art + Plus (for those with cognitive impairment/dementia) by pixiejan | Neurological Disorders | Scoop.it
Reblogged this on Fran's World of Wonder.
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