Neuroethology
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Neuroethology
The natural relation between body, nervous system and environment
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Journal of Maritime Archaeology, Volume 4, Number 1 - SpringerLink

‘The Social’ and Beyond: Introducing Actor-Network Theory
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Loop the loop, DNA style: One- or two-way transcription depends on gene loops

Loop the loop, DNA style: One- or two-way transcription depends on gene loops | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered that, by forming or undoing gene loops, cells manipulate the path of the transcription machinery -- which reads out instructions from DNA -- controlling whether it moves along the genetic material in one direction or two.
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Scientists Invent Method to Create Memories in Brains

Scientists Invent Method to Create Memories in Brains | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
I find this extremely hard to believe, but according to new research published in Nature Neuroscience, scientists have invented a method to induce memories in brains for the first time in history.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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New Caledonian crows reason about hidden causal agents

New Caledonian crows reason about hidden causal agents | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

We have generally believed that animals are not capable of very complex thought, even though many species use tools and engage in other complex behaviors. This study looks at whether New Caledonian crows, that were caught just for this experiment, are capable of attributing actions to a hidden cause, when they see that possible cause come and go.


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Wild parrots name their babies | video |

Wild parrots name their babies | video | | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
Wild green-rumped parrotlet parents give their babies their own individual names...

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Robotic patch-clamping automates study of neurons in living mouse brains

Robotic patch-clamping automates study of neurons in living mouse brains | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

A radically new method of automating the process of finding and recording information from neurons in the living brain has been developed by MIT and Georgia Tech researchers. A robotic arm guided by a cell-detecting computer algorithm can identify and record from neurons in the living mouse brain with far better accuracy and speed than a human experimenter.

 

The new automated process eliminates the need for months of training and will provide long-sought information about living cells’ activities. Using this technique, scientists could classify the thousands of different types of cells in the brain, map how they connect to each other, and figure out how diseased cells differ from normal cells.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Biologists create first predictive computational model of gene networks that control development of sea-urchin embryos

Biologists create first predictive computational model of gene networks that control development of sea-urchin embryos | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
As an animal develops from an embryo, its cells take diverse paths, eventually forming different body parts -- muscles, bones, heart.
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Scientists Prove DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies — the Power of Hyper-Communication

Scientists Prove DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies — the Power of Hyper-Communication | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
by Grazyna Fosar and Franz Bludorf Compiled, summarized and translated by Bärbel Mohr THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET and superior in many aspects to the artificial one.  Russian scientific ...

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Automatons Get Creative

Automatons Get Creative | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

Powerful new computer programs are doing tasks once reserved for composers, writers and policy-makers.




Via Mário Florido, Sakis Koukouvis
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2600 years of history in one object

TED Talks A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script, damaged and broken, the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism.

 

At first glance this TED Talk appears to be more about ancient history, archaeology and biblical studies that anything modern.  Yet as Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum continues his discussion of the Cyrus Cylinder (A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script), it becomes clear that this historical artifact is vital in understanding how modern states conceive of their heritage, cultural legacy and role within the Middle East today (such as Israel, Iraq, Iran and even the U.K.).  As such the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism and plays a role in shaping Middle Eastern cultural and political institutions. 


This reminds me of the Geek word 'aletheia'


Via Seth Dixon
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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:18 PM
Objects, ideas and land can have multi overlapping meanings that are constantly being reinterpreted by each succeeding generation creating new symbolic understandings that overlap into many societies and cultures.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:16 AM

Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum, explains Middle Eastern history using the Cyrus Cylinder.  His first point in this TED talk is especially interesting because he explains that people age and perish and objects do the same, but objects such as this cylinder survive and are able to tell important stories of history for a much longer time than people normally can.

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Scientists create chemical 'brain': Giant network links all known compounds and reactions

Scientists create chemical 'brain': Giant network links all known compounds and reactions | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

Scientists have connected 250 years of organic chemical knowledge into one giant computer network -- a chemical Google on steroids. 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Tracing the world's common ancestor

Tracing the world's common ancestor | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
In Jesus's lifetime, the whole population of the Holy Land may have been descended from King David. So how many generations does it take before we are all related to each other, asks evolutionary biologist Dr Yan Wong.


 in 3,000 years someone alive today will be the common ancestor of all humanity.A few thousand years after that, 80% of us (those who leave children who in turn leave children, and so on) will be ancestors of all humanity.



I wonder...


1)Will this increase Altruism (as it is considered to be a kin selection behaviour)


2)Is it a case for a kind of Singularity which transcends technology and overcomes man


3)Will self similarity in the system of genealogical humanity create a collective conscious which transcends its own singularity then splits and creates dialogue/symbiosis with something beyond man which creates a new synthesis called say, "uniwelt" or the power to control the universe or much of it 


4) Will universal relatedness mean that the human race goes into decay/remission or will 

technology, bioengineering etc... transcend this regression



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The City As Engine: Energy, Entropy And The Triumph Of Disorder : NPR

The City As Engine: Energy, Entropy And The Triumph Of Disorder : NPR | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

Instead of just basic machines, the city becomes a vast interconnected system designed for turning energy into work. Seen through that lens, cities are really giant heat engines, and that makes them creatures subject to one of the most profound principles in all of physics: the omnipresent Second Law of Thermodynamics.


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Ethnomethodology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ethnomethodology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

Ethnomethodology is an ethnographic approach to sociological inquiry introduced by the American sociologist Harold Garfinkel. Ethnomethodology's research interest is the study of the everyday methods that people use for the production of social order (Garfinkel:2002). Ethnomethodology's goal is to document the methods and practices through which society's members make sense of their world (WIKIPEDIA)

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Subtle differences in the DNA of honeybees are reflected in the bees' roles within the hive

Subtle differences in the DNA of honeybees are reflected in the bees' roles within the hive | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
Switching roles within the hive is reflected in reversible epigenetic changes.

 

All honeybees (Apis mellifera) are born equal, but this situation doesn’t last long. Although genetically identical, the bees soon take on the specific roles of queen or worker. These roles are defined not just by behavioural differences, but by physical ones. Underlying them are minor modifications to their DNA: ‘epigenetic’ changes that leave the DNA sequence intact, but that add chemical tags in the form of methyl (CH3) molecules to sections of the DNA. This in turn alters the way a gene is expressed.

 

Once a bee is a queen or worker, they fulfil that role for life — the change is irreversible. But that is not the case for the subdivisions among the workers. The workers start out as nurses, which look after and feed the queen and larvae, and most then go on to become foragers, which travel out from the hive in search of pollen. Again the two types have very different methylation patterns in their DNA. This time, however, as the latest research show, the DNA modifications are reversible: if a forager reverts to being a nurse, its methylation pattern reverts too.

 

Led by Andrew Feinberg of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and Gro Amdam of Arizona State University in Tempe, the researchers coaxed forager bees back into nursing roles by removing all the nurses from the hive while the foragers were out looking for pollen. When the foragers returned, they noticed the lack of nurses, and about half of them took on nursing roles. Examination of the methylation patterns in DNA from their brain cells showed that these too had switched back to the pattern associated with nurses.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Mark Slusher
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Low fertility increases descendant socioeconomic position but reduces long-term fitness in a modern post-industrial society

Low fertility increases descendant socioeconomic position but reduces long-term fitness in a modern post-industrial society | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

Adaptive accounts of modern low human fertility argue that small family size maximizes the inheritance of socioeconomic resources across generations and may consequently increase long-term fitness.


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New DNA study shows humankind’s complex origins in Africa

New DNA study shows humankind’s complex origins in Africa | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

The Khoe and San peoples in southern Africa play an important role for our understanding of the evolutionary history of humans. These peoples are directly descended from the first branching of the genealogical tree of today’s humans. This is shown in a study led by Uppsala University researchers and being presented in the early online version of the journal Science today.


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National Magazine Award Finalist on SINGULARITY - Collection of Special Reports

National Magazine Award Finalist on SINGULARITY - Collection of Special Reports | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

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Chimpanzees create 'social traditions': Unique handclasp grooming behavior reveals local difference

Chimpanzees create 'social traditions': Unique handclasp grooming behavior reveals local difference | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
Researchers have revealed that chimpanzees are not only capable of learning from one another, but also use this social information to form and maintain local traditions.
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A new evolutionary history of primates

A new evolutionary history of primates | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

A robust new phylogenetic tree resolves many long-standing issues in primate taxonomy. The genomes of living primates harbor remarkable differences in diversity and provide an intriguing context for interpreting human evolution. The phylogenetic analysis was conducted by international researchers to determine the origin, evolution, patterns of speciation, and unique features in genome divergence among primate lineages.

 

The authors sequenced 54 gene regions from 186 species spanning the primate radiation. The analysis illustrates the importance of resolving complex, species-rich phylogenies using large-scale comparative genomic approach. Patterns of species and gene sequence evolution and adaptation relate not only to human genome organization and genetic disease sensitivity, but also to global emergence of zoonoses (human pathogens originating from non-human disease reservoirs), to mammalian comparative genomics, to primate taxonomy and to species conservation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mapping population densities: some interesting models

Mapping population densities: some interesting models | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

New kind of cartograms to map population densities on this planet from an article in the Telegraph. The cartograms use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Sixth Sense

A Sixth Sense | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

We still have a lot to learn about how animals use magnetic fields. And how does magnetoreception even work? How animals navigate over long distances is still a great mystery, but scientists are on the case.


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Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say

Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists say the first speakers of what would become the Indo-European languages were probably farmers in what is now Turkey — a conclusion that differs by hundreds of miles and thousands of years from a longstanding linguistic theory.

 

This research potentially can explain much about the geography of languages and the distribution of cultural groups in Eurasia. 

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Human cells, worms, frogs and plants share mechanism for asymmetrical patterning: tubulin proteins

Human cells, worms, frogs and plants share mechanism for asymmetrical patterning: tubulin proteins | Neuroethology | Scoop.it
As organisms develop, their internal organs arrange in a consistent asymmetrical pattern -- heart and stomach to the left, liver and appendix to the right. But how does this happen?

 

Biologists at Tufts University have produced the first evidence that a class of proteins that make up a cell's skeleton -- tubulin proteins -- drives asymmetrical patterning across a broad spectrum of species, including plants, nematode worms, frogs, and human cells, at their earliest stages of development.

 

Up to now, scientists have identified cilia -- rotating hair-like structures located on the outside of cells -- as having an essential role in determining where internal organs eventually end up. Scientists hypothesized that during later stages of development, cilia direct the flow of embryonic fluid which allows the embryo to distinguish its right side from its left. But it is known that many species develop consistent left-right asymmetry without cilia being present, which suggests that asymmetry can be accomplished in other ways.

 

The researchers pinpointed tubulin proteins, an important component of the cell's skeleton, or cytoskeleton. Tubulin mutations are known to affect the asymmetry of a plant called Arabidopsis, and previous work suggested the possibility that laterality is ultimately triggered by some component of the cytoskeleton. Further, this mechanism could be widely used throughout the tree of life and could function at the earliest stages of embryonic development. Importantly, mutated tubulins perturbed asymmetry only when they were introduced immediately after fertilization, not when they were injected after the first or second cell division. This suggested that a normal cytoskeleton drives asymmetry at extremely early stages of embryogenesis, many hours earlier than the appearance of cilia.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A New Kind Of Social Science For The  21st century - A Conversation with Nicholas A. Christakis (w/video)

A New Kind Of Social Science For The  21st century - A Conversation with Nicholas A. Christakis  (w/video) | Neuroethology | Scoop.it

These three things—a biological hurricane, computational social science, and the rediscovery of experimentation—are going to change the social sciences in the 21st century. With that change will come, in my judgment, a variety of discoveries and opportunities that offer tremendous prospect for improving the human condition.
It's one thing to say that the way in which we study our object of inquiry, namely humans, is undergoing profound change, as I think it is. The social sciences are indeed changing. But the next question is: is the object of inquiry also undergoing profound change? It's not just how we study it that's changing, which it is. The question is: is the thing itself, our humanity, also changing?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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