Neurobiology
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Regulating single protein prompts fibroblasts to become neurons

Regulating single protein prompts fibroblasts to become neurons | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
Repression of a single protein in ordinary fibroblasts is sufficient to directly convert the cells – abundantly found in connective tissues – into functional neurons.
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Scientists design, control movements of molecular motor

Scientists design, control movements of molecular motor | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—An international team of scientists has taken the next step in creating nanoscale machines by designing a multi-component molecular motor that can be moved clockwise and counterclockwise.
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PLOS Biology: Neurons Refine the Caenorhabditis elegans Body Plan by Directing Axial Patterning by Wnts

PLOS Biology: Neurons Refine the Caenorhabditis elegans Body Plan by Directing Axial Patterning by Wnts | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
PLOS Biology is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal that features works of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems, including works at the interface with other disciplines.
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Frontiers | Dynamic functions of GABA signaling during granule cell maturation | Frontiers in Neural Circuits

Frontiers | Dynamic functions of GABA signaling during granule cell maturation | Frontiers in Neural Circuits | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
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Transsynaptic Tracing with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Reveals Novel Retinal Circuitry

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Streamlined engineering for synthetic biology : Nature Methods : Nature Publishing Group

Streamlined engineering for synthetic biology : Nature Methods : Nature Publishing Group | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
Researchers are injecting ever more conscious design into their bioengineering workflow.
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Augmented Vision: A plethora of wearable displays coming our way

Augmented Vision: A plethora of wearable displays coming our way | Neurobiology | Scoop.it

Most augmented reality glasses incorporate a tiny projector in one arm of the spectacles. The picture is then reflected from the side into the centre of the lenses, which are etched with a reflective pattern that then beams the image into the eye. That means the image is directly incorporated into what the wearer see when looking directly ahead – unlike Google’s current incarnation of Google Glass, which puts a small video screen in the bottom right-hand corner of the right eye. That requires the wearer to look down to focus on it, taking their attention away from the view ahead.

 

In this review, many different augmented reality vision devices are shown and their features explained. Welcome to the new world of 2013!


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Significance of the Modular Organization of Entorhinal Grid Cells

The Significance of the Modular Organization of Entorhinal Grid Cells | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
Enthusiastic and Excited response to the publication of “The entorhinal grid map is discretized” (Stensola, et al, Nature, 492, 72-78; 2012) Background The hippocampal formation is an a...
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Uniquely Conjoined twins Tatiana and Krista can see through each other's eye

Uniquely Conjoined twins Tatiana and Krista can see through each other's eye | Neurobiology | Scoop.it

Conjoined twins Tatiana and Krista has unique abilities to see through the other's eyes. Recent functional MRIs demonstrate that physical sensation can be a shared experience too: one can feel the touch of a hand on the other’s kneecap, identify a particular toe being tugged, laugh when her twin is being tickled. They also may share some motor function.

 

They are conjoined not just by flesh and bone. Their brains are zippered together by a neural bridge between the thalami, the sensory processing hubs of their brains. This bridge, which the girls can flitter across at will, has raised questions and inspired a sense of wonder among even the most seasoned specialists.

 

How does it work? What are its limits? What could it mean to our understanding of the ability of the brain to change and adapt? What does it mean in terms of how we understand the development of personality, empathy and consciousness?

 

Doug Cochrane, a neurosurgeon at B.C. Children’s Hospital, was part of a multi-disciplinary team assembled to attend the birth and followup care of the girls in 2006. He had never worked with a set of craniopagus twins; conjoined twins are extremely rare and those joined at the head are the rarest, with an occurrence rate estimated at one in 2.5 million births. Few survive.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Kimmy S's curator insight, April 19, 2013 10:52 AM

Very Intresting!

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Glutamate-Dependent Neuroglial Calcium Signaling Differs Between Young and Adult Brain

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15 times stronger than steel: Scientists develops strongest, lightest glass nanofibres in the world

15 times stronger than steel: Scientists develops strongest, lightest glass nanofibres in the world | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
The University of Southampton's Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) is pioneering research into developing the strongest silica nanofibres in the world.

Via LeapMind
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structural fiber optics

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Space-simulation study reveals sodium rhythms in the body

Space-simulation study reveals sodium rhythms in the body | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
Maintaining the right sodium levels in the body is crucial for controlling blood pressure and ensuring proper muscle function.
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Frontiers | Visualizing leukocyte trafficking in the living brain with 2-photon intravital microscopy | Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience

Frontiers | Visualizing leukocyte trafficking in the living brain with 2-photon intravital microscopy | Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
Intravital imaging of the superficial brain tissue in mice represents a powerful tool for the dissection of the cellular and molecular cues underlying inflammatory and infectious central nervous system diseases.
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Wiring the Brain: How Viruses Can Be Engineered to Trace Neural Connections | Think Tank | Big Think

Wiring the Brain: How Viruses Can Be Engineered to Trace Neural Connections | Think Tank | Big Think | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
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Face the facts: Neural integration transforms unconscious face detection into conscious face perception

Face the facts: Neural integration transforms unconscious face detection into conscious face perception | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—The apparent ease and immediacy of human perception is deceptive, requiring highly complex neural operations to determine the category of objects in a visual scene.
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John Hewitt's curator insight, December 31, 2012 10:12 AM

Noot a fan of the EEG and fMRI in general but the concept is well intentioned

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Face the facts: Neural integration transforms unconscious face detection into conscious face perception

Face the facts: Neural integration transforms unconscious face detection into conscious face perception | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—The apparent ease and immediacy of human perception is deceptive, requiring highly complex neural operations to determine the category of objects in a visual scene.
John Hewitt's insight:

Noot a fan of the EEG and fMRI in general but the concept is well intentioned

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Small circles of extrachromosomal DNA appear to be widespread in mammals

Small circles of extrachromosomal DNA appear to be widespread in mammals | Neurobiology | Scoop.it
A newly identified form of DNA—small circles of non-repetitive sequences—may be widespread in somatic cells of mice and humans, according to a study in this week’s issue of Science. These extrachromosomal bits of DNA, dubbed microDNA, may be the byproducts of microdeletions in chromosomes, meaning that cells all over the body may have their own constellation of missing pieces of DNA.

 

“It’s an intriguing finding,” said James Lupski, a geneticist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston who did not participate in the research. Most DNA studies use cells drawn from blood, but that snapshot of a person’s genome may not be giving a complete picture, Lupski explained, if cells in other organs have their own set of chromosomal snippets missing.

 

But the findings do not surprise Sabine Mai, who studies genomic instability at the University of Manitoba. Extrachromosomal DNA is a well-studied phenomenon in cells ranging from plants to humans, she says. This research is just renaming an old phenomenon, previously referred to small polydispersed DNA. Small circles of DNA have been identified before, Mai says, though new deep sequencing techniques will allow for a “deeper characterization” of these extrachromosomal snippets.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dedifferentiation of Neurons and Astrocytes by Oncogenes Can Induce Gliomas in Mice

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