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Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis - Dana Foundation

Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis - Dana Foundation | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in which the immune system, normally charged with fighting off invading organisms, attacks the body’s myelin sheaths, the protective insulation that envelops neurons and facilitates high-speed neuronal communication. Without myelin to assist and protect neurons, the brain and spinal cord signals that permit us to interact with our environment malfunction. Neurons in the brain can be compared to the electrical wires of a house. Both are wrapped in protective insulation—neurons in myelin and electrical wires in rubber—to protect the integrity of their structures. In a way similar to how lights flicker when there is erratic signaling or fail to turn on when their wires rust and break, MS patients often experience weakness, loss of coordination, and neuropathic pain due to erratic neural signaling. They may also experience paralysis when their neurons and myelin sheaths are damaged beyond repair.

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Are social conservatives just being squeamish? — The Conversation

Are social conservatives just being squeamish? — The Conversation | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

By Rob Brooks, Prof. of Evolutionary Ecology, UNSW

 

Evolutionary psychologists get a bad rap. I should not be surprised, really. They probe motivations for human behaviour that often exist far beneath conscious thought and the sanitised stories people tell themselves about why they do what they do. Some evolutionary explanations for human behaviour sound so outrageous that the only reasonable reaction seems to be … outrage.

 

In this vein, I recently enjoyed a hugely productive detour into the science of social conservatism. Not to say that conservatism is a science. That would be ironic. I mean the evolutionary explanations for why some people gravitate toward conservatism and others toward progressive ideas.

 

It started with a few posts by US author Chris Mooney, promoting his recent book The Republican Brain: The Science of Why they Deny Science — And Reality. Which introduced me to moral psychologist Jonathan Haidt....

 

Normally, I have an allergy to evolutionary psychology, NOT because I'm afraid of evolution or like my human exceptionalism attacked, as evolutionary psychologists tend to assert, but because I often find conclusions come before data or the interpretive lens is simply un-disprovable, bullet proof no matter what the findings. HOWEVER, this short post by Prof. Brooks is very good and, though I might not agree with all of it, does a nice job also laying out some of the key concepts around the 'behavioural immune system.'

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A Closer Look at the Rise of the Cheating Culture | Education News

A Closer Look at the Rise of the Cheating Culture | Education News | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
By Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez

 

When I read recently about how students at Stuyvesant High School and Harvard University, to name only two recent prominent examples, used everything from notes on scraps of paper to texting answers on cell phones to help each other out on exams, I had to shake my head—not at the students’ behavior, but at the institutional culture to which they were responding.

 

Hernandez turns a discussion of cheating into a reflection on the type of educational institutions and pedagogy that encourage and reward cheating. Nice discussion of Paulo Freire and pedagogy.

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Cyborg anthropologist: We can all be superhuman

Cyborg anthropologist: We can all be superhuman | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
What exactly is cyborg anthropology?...

 

Cyborg anthropology is the study of the interaction between humans and technology, and how technology affects culture. Mobile technology allows one to stand almost anywhere in the world, whisper something, and be heard elsewhere. These devices that live in our pockets need to be fed every night require our frequent attention. In only a few years these devices have become stitched into the fabric of our everyday lives.

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Adio Motayne's curator insight, November 4, 2013 5:44 AM

A branch of anthropology that is strongly influenced by technology and how people interact with it.

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Study reveals autism treatment clues

Study reveals autism treatment clues | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

Young autistic children who can spontaneously imitate adults and use objects in a functional way may be more likely to respond well to a therapy called the Early Start Denver Model, new research shows.

 

The Early Start Denver Model uses play to teach social skills like taking turns to autistic pre-school children but its success varies greatly from child to child.

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List of recent untimely deaths for NFL players - NFL - SI.com

List of recent untimely deaths for NFL players - NFL - SI.com | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

The apparent murder-suicide of Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, 25, is one of a series of untimely deaths for current or former NFL players in recent years:

 

- In July 2012, Tennessee Titans receiver O.J. Murdock, 25, was found in his car in front of his Florida high school with what appeared to be self-inflicted gunshot wounds.

 

Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/nfl/wires/12/02/2020.ap.fbn.untimely.deaths.0759/index.html#ixzz2DxN6g86s

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The Subversive Archaeologist: I taught I taw a unicown. I did! I did! I did tee a unicown! Doodness, dwacious, me!

The Subversive Archaeologist: I taught I taw a unicown. I did! I did! I did tee a unicown! Doodness, dwacious, me! | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

From the Subversive Archaeologist's news ticker and London's Telegraph comes this too-good-to-be-true archaeological claim:

 

"North Korea 'archaeologists' report quite unbelievable discovery of unicorn lair"

 

This must surely be the archaeological find of the Common Era!

 

According to the History Institute of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea Academy of Social Sciences, an inscribed slab found in Pyongyang apparently alerted them to the singular importance of this site. The slab read, simply, "Unicorn Lair." This miraculous slab is believed to date to the Koryo Kingdom (918-1392), and in particular identifies the lair as belonging to King Tongmyong, whose temple still stands nearby in the North Korean city.

 

This remarkable find finally puts the people's Korea on the geo-political-historical-evolutionary-democratic-anthropological map, squarely above the Republic of Korea, just like it has always been on maps!

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Lecture 3 - Old barriers and new models: the private sector, government and the economic empowerment of Aboriginal Australians - Boyer Lectures - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corpora...

Lecture 3 - Old barriers and new models: the private sector, government and the economic empowerment of Aboriginal Australians - Boyer Lectures - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corpora... | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
In her third lecture, Professor Langton illuminates the experiences of two Aboriginal communities who are levering economic advancement through agreements with mining companies, and examines why it is that the private sector is leading the way in...
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The High Cost Of Our Throwaway Culture  |  Peak Oil News and Message Boards

The High Cost Of Our Throwaway Culture  |  Peak Oil News and Message Boards | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
Peak Oil News and Message Boards is a community and collaboration portal about energy-related topics.

 

As I said in my previous column, we are the biggest force in moving the planet’s rocks and sediments around. Our global extractions are environmentally damaging and depleting some resources to the extent that they are in danger of running out.

 

Many of those resources find their way into the goods, gadgets and machines that we find indispensable in our everyday lives. But do we really need so much stuff, or are we simply addicted to the new? There’s no doubt that our consumption of resources from food to gadgets has risen dramatically over the past 60 years, and much of the world seems to be in the grip of a shopping epidemic. But is there a conscious effort driving it?

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University Sets Up Puppy Room For Stressed Out Students

University Sets Up Puppy Room For Stressed Out Students | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
The end of semester can be a tough time, with students feeling the crunch of big assignments and cramming for exams. Add to it the lack of sleep, eating badly and more than a few drinks, and it's pretty easy to get stressed out.

 

Okay, I usually try to post and scoop serious stuff, but this is obviously a university that is on to something profoundly important. I think staff need a puppy room, too!

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Jean M. O’Brien

According to Dr. Jean M. O’Brien, professor of history at the University of Minnesota, Ojibwe is such a descriptive language that if you created a word for television set in the language and spoke it to an Ojibwe person who has never seen TV, that person would be able to picture a television set—what it does and what it is used for—just by the construction and meaning of the word.

 

A video at Vimeo

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Book: Transforming Ethnographic Knowledge

Book: Transforming Ethnographic Knowledge | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
YaleNews features works recently or soon to be published by members of the University community. Descriptions are based on material provided by the publishers.
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Most Contagious 2012 | Seymourpowell Blog

Most Contagious 2012 | Seymourpowell Blog | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

Ahead of his keynote at this year’s prestigious Most Contagious event in London on 12 December, Seymourpowell‘s co-founder and design director, Richard Seymour, shares his thoughts on the relationship between design and technology and the vital role of anthropology in the creative process.

 

You can watch the film here.

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Arizona Woman's Runny Nose Turns Out to Be Leaking Brain Fluid

Arizona Woman's Runny Nose Turns Out to Be Leaking Brain Fluid | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

35-year-old Aundrea Aragon's four month-long runny nose, which multiple doctor's credited to "severe allergies," turned out to be a cerebrospinal fluid leak. In layman's terms, brain fluid was leaking all over her face. "It wasn't even dripping, it was pouring out of my nose," said the Tucson, AZ native. Had the disease gone untreated, it could be deadly due to the risk of infection.

 

Greg: I've sometimes felt like my brains were leaking out (usually towards the end of a bad conference panel), but a case where someone actually had sprung a brain leak.

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The rise and rise of the science politician — The Conversation

The rise and rise of the science politician — The Conversation | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

By Matthew Bailes

 

In our naive youth, we imagine scientific careers that are exceedingly pure.

 

In them, all that matters is the quality of our ideas, evidence and insight, written up in concise documents and published in refereed journals.

 

Bailes discusses the worrying rise of the 'science politician,' the savvy science careerist who works the system of grants, awards and collaboration better than the actual tools of their discipline.

 

Some of the comments are inter-disciplinary carping, but the article itself is an pointed denunciation of something I've been noticing a lot more since I've been in Australia: the way that some scholars get 'research tracked' here even though it's hard to perceive that the work is all that much better than anyone elses. Showered with grants and support, early 'promise' becomes self-fulfilling prophecy without necessarily translating to great theoretical or scientific effect.

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Thought for week- public health and wider matters: Alcohol No Ordinary Commodity: Some Ramblings

Those of you with even a modicum of knowledge of alcohol policy will know that this title is not original but taken from a very famous book by Babor et al. However it is a good way to introduce a few of my rambling thoughts on how normalised alcohol has become in our culture. The stimulus for this was an encounter on twitter. Many tweets (I am just of guilty of this) are bit jokey and often somewhat facile. I received a tweet inviting all people following the strand to a school fete where high end vodka would be sold. The school was in the independent sector and catered from children of all ages. There was an interaction to establish what was taking place. Apparently there was a licence for this event and it was not to promote the product. Now I am sure academic careers have been made on discussing the distinction between promotion and selling but as the reasonable man it strikes me that the ultimate aim is the same-to sell more of the product. In the past I have been a treasurer for a PTA and I know the financial pressures schools are under and I have no doubt this is perfectly legal but have we really reached a point where everything is a marketing opportunity?

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The DSM-5 has been finalised

The DSM-5 has been finalised | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

It’s arcane, contradictory and talks about invisible entities which no-one can really prove. Yes folks, the new psychiatric bible has been finalised.

 

The American Psychiatric Association have just announced that the new diagnostic manual, to be officially published in May 2013, has been approved by the board of trustees.

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The Psychology of Cults - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Psychology of Cults - All In The Mind - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

Podcast from RadioNational Australia.

 

If you sign up to a weekend personal development workshop, you don’t really expect to emerge 10 years later a shadow of your former emotional self. What sets many groups apart from what we regard as cults is a range of powerful psychological techniques which can be difficult to see through—particularly if you are at a vulnerable time of your life. We hear the story of one woman’s escape from a cult and some insights into those persuasive techniques

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ibiss helter's curator insight, September 20, 2013 3:41 AM

nice ine

EerstehulpSEO's comment, September 24, 2013 10:57 PM
awesome
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Living, Breathing, Professors

In Defense of the Living, Breathing Professor‘

 

“Crowd-sourcing’ the grading of an essay online is no substitute for thoughtful evaluation by a trained educator.”

 

This is an excellent commentary about mass classes published in the Wall Street Journal, of all places. Have a look:it is all about why good teachers have little to fear form from the current fad in mass internet classes (MOOCS in the current parlance).

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Human Evolution Enters an Exciting New Phase | Wired Science | Wired.com

Human Evolution Enters an Exciting New Phase | Wired Science | Wired.com | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
If you could escape the human time scale for a moment, and regard evolution from the perspective of deep time, in which the last 10,000 years are a short chapter in a long story, you'd say: Things are pretty wild right now.
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The Coasian culture that is Japan

The Coasian culture that is Japan | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

A forthcoming paper* in the Journal of Financial Economics finds not only that inherited family control is still common in Japanese business, but that family firms are “puzzlingly competitive”, outperforming otherwise similar professionally managed companies. “These results are highly robust and…suggest family control ‘causes’ good performance rather than the converse,” say the authors.

 

Japan boasts some of the world’s oldest family-run businesses, and many family firms—Suzuki, Matsui Securities, Suntory—break the rule of steady dynastic decline. So how do Japanese firms do it? The answer, says the paper, is adoption.

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Study: Stress Causes Brain To Shrink - CBS Connecticut

Study: Stress Causes Brain To Shrink - CBS Connecticut | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
A new study has found that living a stressful life may lead to shrinking in important parts of the brain.
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Anthropology News: Announcing Open–and then closed again–Anthropology | Savage Minds

Anthropology News: Announcing Open–and then closed again–Anthropology | Savage Minds | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it

Ryan Anderson gets excited, but then less so about the news that the AAA is creating a kind-of-Open Anthropology. Here's the kicker...

 

That would be the catch. Did you see it? Here it is again:

 

There will be a specific policy for Open Anthropology on “ungating” and perhaps “re-gating” content after a certain period of time.

 

Re-gating? What on earth is that? How is that open access? So the AAA is going to do open access, but not really. It’s like “kind of open access” and then not open anymore. I think they need a new name for the publication they are proposing here. Maybe “Open and then no so open anthropology”? “Part-time open anthropology, except on weekends, holidays, Mondays, and blackout dates”? That has a nice ring to it. How about this: “Open anthropology with an asterisk”? “Open For A Limited Time Offer Anthropology”? “Oops who left the gate open anthropology?” One last one: “I can’t believe it’s open oh wait it’s really not anthropology”? I like that one. Really hits the nail on the head.

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The Long-Dead Native Language Wopânâak is Revived - Yankee Magazine

The Long-Dead Native Language Wopânâak is Revived - Yankee Magazine | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
The long-dead Native language that once greeted the Pilgrims is today again being spoken.

 

Kuweeqâhsun ... This was the first word that Jessie Little Doe Baird spoke to her daughter, Mae, the day she was born. The birth hadn't gone as planned. Jessie had spent most of the last four months of her pregnancy in bed. She was 40 years old and already had four grown children, but Mae was no accident. Jessie took this last risky plunge into motherhood with her eyes wide open.

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Anthropologist in the Attic: Coral files reveal time of first Polynesian settlements

Anthropologist in the Attic: Coral files reveal time of first Polynesian settlements | Neuroanthropology | Scoop.it
#anthropology Coral files reveal time of first Polynesian settlements http://t.co/XeyKwfnC...
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