cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art
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The Rite of Spring's Digital Centennial

The Rite of Spring's Digital Centennial | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
The performance that almost incited the well-heeled of Paris to a ravenous riot is celebrating its centennial. Even now the pounding score of Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring that debuted on Ma...
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Frontiers | The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Frontiers | The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
Frontiers | The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience publishes articles on the most outstanding discoveries across the research spectrum of Frontiers | The brain on art:...
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40/40 Vision Lecture: Neurology and the Passion for Art

40/40 Vision Lecture: Neurology and the Passion for Art | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
Why is it that great works of art seem to have a universal appeal, transcending cultural and geographic boundaries? V.S. Ramachandran, director of UCSD's Cen...
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Changing brains for the better: Article documents benefits of multiple practices, such as physical exercise and meditation

Practices like physical exercise, certain forms of psychological counseling and meditation can all change brains for the better, and these changes can be measured with the tools of modern neuroscience, according to a new review article.

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Huey O'Brien's curator insight, March 20, 2013 11:33 AM

IMPLICATIONS:  Learning Content Design

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Deric Bownds' MindBlog: Where thinking about thinking happens in the brain.

Deric Bownds' MindBlog: Where thinking about thinking happens in the brain. | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it

Humans are metacognitive: they monitor and control their cognition. Our hypothesis was that neuronal correlates of metacognition reside in the same brain areas responsible for cognition, including frontal cortex. Recent work demonstrated that nonhuman primates are capable of metacognition, so we recorded from single neurons in the frontal eye field, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and supplementary eye field of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that performed a metacognitive visual-oculomotor task. The animals made a decision and reported it with a saccade, but received no immediate reward or feedback. Instead, they had to monitor their decision and bet whether it was correct. Activity was correlated with decisions and bets in all three brain areas, but putative metacognitive activity that linked decisions to appropriate bets occurred exclusively in the SEF. Our results offer a survey of neuronal correlates of metacognition and implicate the SEF in linking cognitive functions over short periods of time.


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Aldous Huxley interview-1958 (FULL)

A rare 1958 interview from the author of "Brave New World" Thank you for watching.

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A Computational Foundation for the Study of Cognition — consc.net — Readability

ABSTRACT

Computation is central to the foundations of modern cognitive science, but its role is controversial. Questions about computation abound: What is it for a physical system to implement a computation? Is computation sufficient for thought? What is the role of computation in a theory of cognition? What is the relation between different sorts of computational theory, such as connectionism and symbolic computation? In this paper I develop a systematic framework that addresses all of these questions.

Justifying the role of computation requires analysis of implementation, the nexus between abstract computations and concrete physical systems. I give such an analysis, based on the idea that a system implements a computation if the causal structure of the system mirrors the formal structure of the computation. This account can be used to justify the central commitments of artificial intelligence and computational cognitive science: the thesis of computational sufficiency, which holds that the right kind of computational structure suffices for the possession of a mind, and the thesis of computational explanation, which holds that computation provides a general framework for the explanation of cognitive processes. The theses are consequences of the facts that (a) computation can specify general patterns of causal organization, and (b) mentality is an organizational invariant, rooted in such patterns. Along the way I answer various challenges to the computationalist position, such as those put forward by Searle. I close by advocating a kind of minimal computationalism, compatible with a very wide variety of empirical approaches to the mind. This allows computation to serve as a true foundation for cognitive science.


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The Science of “Chunking,” Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity

The Science of “Chunking,” Working Memory, and How Pattern Recognition Fuels Creativity | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
"Generating interesting connections between disparate subjects is what makes art so fascinating to create and to view . . . we are forced to

Via Marc Williams DEBONO (Plasticities Sciences Arts), FastTFriend
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Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela’ Contribution to Media Ecology: Autopoiesis, The Santiago School of Cognition, an Enactive Cognitive Science


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UbuWeb Sound :: Jorge Luis Borges


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FastTFriend's curator insight, April 16, 2013 5:53 AM

These are the six Norton Lectures that Jorge Luis Borges delivered at Harvard University in the fall of 1967 and spring of 1968. The recordings, only lately discovered in the Harvard University Archives, uniquely capture the cadences, candor, wit, and remarkable erudition of one of the most extraordinary and enduring literary voices of our age. Through a twist of fate that the author of Labyrinths himself would have relished, the lost lectures return to us now in Borges' own voice. 

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John Searle on Ludwig Wittgenstein: Section 1

Bryan Magee talks to John Searle about the legacy of Ludwig Wittgenstein; ranging from his early work, the Tractatus, to his posthumously published, Philosophical Investigations.


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Gary Williams, A crude theory of perception, 2011

Thoughts on affordances, information, and the explanatory role of representations

 

Minds and Brains. Musings from a Neurophilosophical Perspective

 

Perception is the reaction to meaningful information, inside or outside the body. The most basic information is information specific to affordances.


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Binaural Beats: Powerful Concentration, Focus & Manifestation - Gamma 40 Hz

*Must listen with headphones* What Are Gamma Brain Waves? -Show more- The fastest documented brainwave frequency range is that of Gamma Brain Waves -- which ...
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PLOS Biology: Neuroaesthetics and the Trouble with Beauty

PLOS Biology: Neuroaesthetics and the Trouble with Beauty | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
PLOS Biology is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal that features works of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems, including works at the interface with other disciplines.
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Living in The Matrix Requires Less Brain Power

Living in The Matrix Requires Less Brain Power | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
Living in The Matrix Requires Less Brain Power - ScienceNOW

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Sakis Koukouvis's curator insight, May 8, 2013 4:51 PM

If you were a rat living in a completely virtual world like in the movie The Matrix, could you tell? Maybe not, but scientists studying your brain might be able to. Today, researchers report that certain cells in rat brains work differently when the animals are in virtual reality than when they are in the real world.

Rescooped by Deborah Lawler-Dormer from LEARNING AND COGNITION
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Evidence builds that meditation strengthens the brain

Evidence builds that meditation strengthens the brain | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that long-term meditators have larger amounts of gyrification ("folding" of the cortex, which may allow the brain to process information faster) then non-meditators.

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Huey O'Brien's curator insight, March 20, 2013 11:38 AM

IMPLICATION:  Learning Performance

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Learning requires rhythmical activity of neurons

Learning requires rhythmical activity of neurons | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
The hippocampus represents an important brain structure for learning. Scientists have discovered how it filters electrical neuronal signals through an input and output control, thus regulating learning and memory processes.

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Huey O'Brien's curator insight, March 20, 2013 11:31 AM

IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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How to Create a Mind

How to Create a Mind | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it

Ray Kurzweil is arguably today’s most influential – and often controversial – futurist. In How to Create a Mind, Kurzweil presents a provocative exploration of the most important project in human-machine civilization-reverse engineering the brain to understand precisely how it works and using that knowledge to create even more intelligent machines.
Kurzweil discusses how the brain functions, how the mind emerges from the brain, and the implications of vastly increasing the powers of our intelligence in addressing the world’s problems. He thoughtfully examines emotional and moral intelligence and the origins of consciousness and envisions the radical possibilities of our merging with the intelligent technology we are creating.
Certain to be one of the most widely discussed and debated science books of the year, How to Create a Mind is sure to take its place alongside Kurzweil’s previous classics.


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Hallucinations with Oliver Sacks

In the first installment of the World Science Festival's new series, Science & Story, famed neurologist Oliver Sacks joined award-winning journalist John Hocken

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What Is Consciousness? Go to the Video! | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

What Is Consciousness? Go to the Video! | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
Various scholars have tried to explain consciousness in long articles and books, but one neuroscience pioneer has just released an unusual video blog to get the ...

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What’s Wrong with the Brain Activity Map Proposal: Scientific American

What’s Wrong with the Brain Activity Map Proposal: Scientific American | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
With the president suggesting a multibillion-dollar neuroscience effort, a leading neuroscientist explains the deep conceptual problems with plans to record all the brain's neurons

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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 8, 2013 9:01 AM

Very interesting take on big project Brain Mapping:


As we enter the era of Big Brain Science projects, it is important to know where the next firm foothold is.

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A neurobiological graphic novel

A neurobiological graphic novel | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
The Guardian has a video about the collaboration between neuroscientist Hana Ros and artist Matteo Farinella as they’ve been working on the neurocomic project to create a brain science graphic novel.

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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 13, 2013 5:45 AM

Go see the video

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On Borges, Particles and the Paradox of the Perceived

How can science, philosophy and a work of pure imagination meet to deepen our understanding of the physical world?

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In 1927 a young German physicist published a paper that would turn the scientific world on its head. Until that time, classical physics had assumed that when a particle’s position and velocity were known, its future trajectory could be calculated. Werner Heisenberg demonstrated that this condition was actually impossible: we cannot know with precision both a particle’s location and its velocity, and the more precisely we know the one, the less we can know the other. Five years later he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for having laid the foundations of quantum physics.

This discovery has all the hallmarks of a modern scientific breakthrough; so it may be surprising to learn that the uncertainty principle was intuited by Heisenberg’s contemporary, the Argentine poet and fiction writer Jorge Luis Borges, and predicted by philosophers centuries and even millenniums before him.

While Borges did not comment on the revolution in physics that was occurring during his lifetime, he was obsessively concerned with paradoxes, and in particular those of the Greek philosopher Zeno. As he wrote in one of his essays: “Let us admit what all the idealists admit: the hallucinatory character of the world. Let us do what no idealist has done: let us look for unrealities that confirm that character. We will find them, I believe, in the antinomies of Kant and in the dialectic of Zeno.”


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Affordance Theory (Gibson)

Affordance Theory (Gibson) | cognition, perception, multisensory, neuroscience and art | Scoop.it
Summary: Affordance theory states that the world is perceived not only in terms of object shapes and spatial relationships but also in terms of object possibilities for action (affordances) -- perception drives action.

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