Bounded Rationali...
Follow
Find
22.7K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
onto Bounded Rationality and Beyond
Scoop.it!

The Brain on Trial

The Brain on Trial | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
Advances in brain science are calling into question the volition behind many criminal acts.A leading neuroscientist describes how the foundations of our criminal-justice system are beginning to crumble, and proposes a new way forward for law and order.
more...
No comment yet.
Bounded Rationality and Beyond
News on effects of Bounded Rationality
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Neuroscientists reverse memories’ emotional associations

Neuroscientists reverse memories’ emotional associations | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
MIT study also identifies the brain circuit that links feelings to memories. 

Most memories have some kind of emotion associated with them: Recalling the week you just spent at the beach probably makes you feel happy, while reflecting on being bullied provokes more negative feelings.

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions. Furthermore, the researchers found that they could reverse the emotional association of specific memories by manipulating brain cells with optogenetics — a technique that uses light to control neuron activity.

The findings, described in the Aug. 27 issue of Nature, demonstrated that a neuronal circuit connecting the hippocampus and the amygdala plays a critical role in associating emotion with memory. This circuit could offer a target for new drugs to help treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, the researchers say.

“In the future, one may be able to develop methods that help people to remember positive memories more strongly than negative ones,” says Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience, director of the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, and senior author of the paper. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Personality Has Minor Effects on Panel Attrition

Abstract: In light of the recent interest in using longitudinal panel data to study personality development, it is important to know if personality traits are related to panel attrition. We analyse the effects of personality on panel drop-out separately for an 'older' subsample (started in 1984), a relatively 'young' subsample (started in 2000), and a 'new' subsample (started in 2009) of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study. We found that openness slightly decreases the probability of panel drop-out in all three samples. For the 'older' subsample only, we found a small negative effect of agreeableness on panel drop-out. We control for age, sex, education, migration background, and the number of inhabitants in the region of the respondents.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

NEUROECONOMICS OF DECISION-MAKING IN THE AGING BRAIN: THE EXAMPLE OF LONG-TERM CARE

ABSTRACT

Purpose – Long-term care (LTC) services assist people with limitations in the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) as a result of chronic illness or disabilities. We discuss possible behavioral explanations for the under-purchasing of LTC insurance, as well as the current state of knowledge on the neural mechanisms behind these behavioral factors.

Findings/approach – Ideas from behavioral economics are discussed, including risk-seeking over losses, ambiguity-preferring over losses, hyperbolic discounting, and the effect of the aging process on the underlying neural mechanisms supporting these decisions. We further emphasize the role of age, as aging is a highly heterogeneous process. It is associated with changes in both brain tissue as well as cognitive abilities, and both are characterized by large individual differences. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms is vital to understanding this heterogeneity and identifying possible methods of interventions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Should Public Policy Promote Better Habits?

Should Public Policy Promote Better Habits? | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

In other words, neoclassical economics is all wrong.

O.K., that's an overstatement. But both concerns about the health effects of urban layouts and attempts to deter certain kinds of consumption are basically about the failings of rationality as a model of human behavior. People should get enough exercise - they will, in general, be happier if they do - but they tend not to get exercise if they live in an environment where it's easy to drive everywhere and not as easy to walk. People should also limit their caloric intake - again, they'll be happier if they do - but they have a hard time resisting those giant tubs of popcorn.

I can personally attest to the importance of these environmental effects. These days, I walk around with a pedometer on my wrist - hey, I'm 61, and it's now or never - and it's obvious just how much more natural it is to get exercise when I'm in New York than when I'm in Princeton, N.J. Choosing to walk just a couple times rather than take the subway fairly easily gets me to 15,000 steps in the city, while even with a morning run it can be hard to break 10,000 in the suburbs. Also, the nanny-state legacy of former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, with calories displayed on practically everything in New York, does help curb my vices (greasy breakfast sandwiches!).

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

The End of Psychology? » IAI TV

The End of Psychology? » IAI TV | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

The end of psychology? Perhaps not quite yet, but there is a serious message behind The Onion’s fantasy about the American Psychology Association (APA). Over the past decades, psychology has been increasingly overtaken by neuroscience. Two multi-billion euro/dollar initiatives – one European, one American – were launched in 2012 with the avowed objectives of “solving the brain” and, in the EU’s case, incorporating the solution into novel “neuromorphic” computers.

Hard-line reductionists speak of “molecular and cellular cognition” and dismiss the mind as an epiphenomenal product of neural processes, a “user illusion,” or, as zoologist Thomas Huxley put it a century and a half ago, merely the whistle to the steam train. Most neuroscientists concur; as Francis Crick put it: “You are nothing but a bunch of neurons.” Neurophilosophers, a world away from Descartes famous Cogito ergo sum speak contemptuously of “folk psychology”, to be replaced as neuroscience progresses by an objective, rigorously defined brain language.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Is Economics a Science?

Is Economics a Science? | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

One problem with economics is that it is necessarily focused on policy, rather than discovery of fundamentals. Nobody really cares much about economic data except as a guide to policy: economic phenomena do not have the same intrinsic fascination for us as the internal resonances of the atom or the functioning of the vesicles and other organelles of a living cell. We judge economics by what it can produce. As such, economics is rather more like engineering than physics, more practical than spiritual.

There is no Nobel Prize for engineering, though there should be. True, the chemistry prize this year looks a bit like an engineering prize, because it was given to three researchers – Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel – “for the development of multiscale models of complex chemical systems” that underlie the computer programs that make nuclear magnetic resonance hardware work. But the Nobel Foundation is forced to look at much more such practical, applied material when it considers the economics prize.

The problem is that once we focus on economic policy, much that is not science comes into play. Politics becomes involved, and political posturing is amply rewarded by public attention. The Nobel Prize is designed to reward those who do not play tricks for attention, and who, in their sincere pursuit of the truth, might otherwise be slighted.


Read more at http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/robert-j--shilleron-whether-he-is-a-scientist#ytyt9w1S1gt9t8QY.99
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Advancing consumer neuroscience

Abstract In the first decade of consumer neuroscience, strong progress has been made in understanding how neuroscience can inform consumer decision making. Here, we sketch the development of this discipline and compare it to that of the adjacent field of neuroeconomics. We describe three new frontiers for ongoing progress at both theoretical and applied levels. First, the field will broaden its boundaries to include genetics and molecular neuroscience, each of which will provide important new insights into individual differences in decision making. Second, recent advances in computational methods will improve the accuracy and out-of-sample generalizability of predicting decisions from brain activity. Third, sophisticated meta-analyses will help consumer neuroscientists to synthesize the growing body of knowledge, providing evidence for consistency and specificity of brain activations and their reliability as measurements of consumer behavior

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

The Problem With Reclining Airplane Seat Design

The Problem With Reclining Airplane Seat Design | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

To recline or not to recline? That is the question now being hotly debated among air travelers after three flights were forced to land after passengers on board began fighting about reclining seats.

But are passengers really the problem? The real issue may be that most airline seats are not designed to fully accommodate the human body in its various shapes and sizes.

“We are fighting each other, but the seats are not designed right,” said Kathleen M. Robinette, professor and head of the department of design, housing and merchandising at Oklahoma State University. “The seats don’t fit us.”

Dr. Robinette would know. She is the lead author of a landmark anthropometric survey conducted by the Air Force with a consortium of 35 organizations and published in 2002. It is widely used by seat makers and other designers.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

The Quick Eye Movement That Reveals Whether It’s Love or Lust — PsyBlog

The Quick Eye Movement That Reveals Whether It’s Love or Lust — PsyBlog | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

How to tell just from the eyes whether it’s love or lust .When a stranger looks into your eyes, it could signal romantic love, but if their eyes then slide down your body, they’re probably feeling sexual desire, a new study finds. This automatic judgement can happen in as little as half a second and likely recruits different networks of activity in the brain.

Stephanie Cacioppo, who led the study, which is published in the journalPsychological Science, said:

“Although little is currently known about the science of love at first sight or how people fall in love, these patterns of response provide the first clues regarding how automatic attentional processes, such as eye gaze, may differentiate feelings of love from feelings of desire toward strangers.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Hyper-Connected: What Depression Does to Your Brain — PsyBlog

Hyper-Connected: What Depression Does to Your Brain — PsyBlog | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

The brains of depressed young adults were compared with normal controls Young adults who have experienced depression have hyper-connected cognitive and emotional networks, a new study finds.Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago scanned the brains of 30 adults between the ages of 18 and 23 while they were in a resting state (Jacobs et al., 2014).

The participants had previously experienced depression but were otherwise healthy and not taking any medication.

Their fMRI scans were compared with those of 23 controls who had not experienced serious depression.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

The Political Economy of Nonlinear Capital Taxation

Abstract:

We study efficient nonlinear taxation of labor and capital in a dynamic Mirrleesian model incorporating political economy constraints. Policies are chosen sequentially over time, without commitment, as the outcome of democratic elections. We study
the best equilibrium for this dynamic game. Our main result is that the marginal tax on capital income is progressive, in the sense that richer agents face higher marginal tax rates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Chaos Theory and its Application in Political Science

Abstract:
The introduction of the notion of chaos – derived from the chaos theory as developed in mathematical and physics sciences – into the study of socio-political phenomena allow us to better understand the dynamic evolution of these non-linear systems. This paper intends to review the still embryonic literature regarding the application of the chaos theory in political science, particularly into the fields of public policies and international relations. The modelling  and prediction attempts made using non-linear tools (such as the mathematical transformations, the fractal objects and other graphic and quantitative methods applicable to the specificities of the socio-political data) reveal the original asset of the chaos for social sciences. Using examples and cases studies, we will attempt to develop and show the pertinence of these original concepts (such as the bifurcations, the strange attractors, or the sensivity to
initial conditions) as well as the analysis and prediction tools associated to them in order to apprehend and understand political phenomena whose behaviour seem to be, at first sight, random or at least unpredictable.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

What Can We Learn From The Wealth of Virtual Nations?

What Can We Learn From The Wealth of Virtual Nations? | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
Economists look to massively multi-player online games for insight into real-world money questions.

A 2009 study led by Edward Castronova, an economist and media expert at Indiana University, took up the question of whether virtual worlds could be considered “economies” in the way a real nation might. The authors examined the MMO EverQuest2 and found that, “with the buying and selling of goods, banking, the creation of goods, and the equivalent of income, derived from taking currency and items from defeated monsters,” the characteristics of a functioning economy were there. Furthermore, a GDP could be calculated, and price levels of various items across the game responded to fluctuations in inflation. "People approach pricing and wealth in virtual environments in much the same way as they do in the real world," Castronova told me. 

How, in a contained economy, does wealth arise among individuals? Can it be a function of a person's behavioral patterns, or position within social networks? 

That’s part of the reason MMOs are so alluring to Castronova—who’s often cited as a founder of the field of virtual economics—as well as to a growing legion of social scientists. Another draw is that these virtual worlds are self-contained and user-driven: For the most part, game developers don’t intervene in the action; each player is following their own quest, forging their own path, building their own networks. People are making decisions on their own. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Fragility of the Commons under Prospect-Theoretic Risk Attitudes

Abstract: We study a common-pool resource game where the resource experiences failure with a probability that grows with the aggregate investment in the resource. To capture decision making under such uncertainty, we model each player's risk preference according to the value function from prospect theory. We show the existence and uniqueness of a pure strategy Nash equilibrium when the players have arbitrary (potentially heterogeneous) risk preferences and under natural assumptions on the rate of return and failure probability of the resource. Greater competition, vis-a-vis the number of players, increases the failure probability at the Nash equilibrium, and we quantify this effect by obtaining (tight) upper bounds on the failure probability at the equilibrium for a large number of players with respect to the failure probability under investment by a single player. We further examine the effects of heterogeneity in risk preferences of the players with respect to two characteristics of the prospect-theoretic value function: loss aversion and diminishing sensitivity. Heterogeneity in attitudes towards loss aversion always leads to higher failure probability of the resource at the equilibrium when compared to the case where players have identical risk preferences, whereas there is no clear trend under heterogeneity in the diminishing sensitivity parameter.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Brain structure could predict risky behavior | neuroscientistnews.com

Brain structure could predict risky behavior | neuroscientistnews.com | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.

Led by Ifat Levy, assistant professor in comparative medicine and neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine, the team found that those with larger volume in a particular part of the parietal cortex were willing to take more risks than those with less volume in this part of the brain. The findings are published in the Sept. 10 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Although several cognitive and personality traits are reflected in brain structure, there has been little research linking brain structure to economic preferences. Levy and her colleagues sought to examine this question in their study.

Study participants included young adult men and women from the northeastern United States. Participants made a series of choices between monetary lotteries that varied in their degree of risk, and the research team conducted standard anatomical MRI brain scans. The results were first obtained in a group of 28 participants, and then confirmed in a second, independent, group of 33 participants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Thinking like a trader selectively reduces individuals’loss aversion

Research on emotion regulation has focused upon observers’ ability to regulate their emotional reaction to stimuli such as affective pictures, but many other aspects of our affective experience are also potentially amenable to intentional cognitive regulation. In the domain of decision-making, recent work has demonstrated a role for emotions in choice, although such work has generally remained agnostic about the specific role of emotion. Combining psychologically-derived cognitive strategies, physiological measurements of arousal, and an economic model of behavior, this study examined changes in choices (specifically, loss aversion) and physiological correlates of behavior as the result of an intentional cognitive regulation strategy. Participants were on average more aroused per dollar to losses relative to gains, as measured with skin conductance response, and the difference in arousal to losses versus gains correlated with behavioral loss aversion across subjects. These results suggest a specific role for arousal responses in loss aversion. Most importantly, the intentional cognitive regulation strategy, which emphasized ‘‘perspective-taking,’’ uniquely reduced both behavioral loss aversion and arousal to losses relative to gains, largely by influencing arousal to losses. Our results confirm previous research demonstrating loss aversion while providing new evidence characterizing individual differences and arousal correlates and illustrating the effectiveness of intentional regulation strategies in reducing loss aversion both behaviorally and physiologically

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

The Art of Being Yourself: Caroline McHugh at TEDxMiltonKeynesWomen - YouTube

aroline McHugh wrote a lovely book about the art of being yourself. We had a great conversation about how the True Mirror was such a great new tool for both discovering and for further knowing your real self, that she included True Mirror in the book. Its a wonderful book that you will be happy to own and show off on your coffee table and bookshelf
From a the book blurb:

How many times has someone offered you that wonderfully insightful piece of advice to 'just be yourself'? Like it hadn't crossed your mind already? 
Here is a wee book with a big idea—that you should be nobody but yourself—offering inspiration and direction for everybody who wants to be more specifically somebody. 
At a time when we're looking for a more honest approach to everything from food to music to politics, Never Not a Lovely Moon offers not a path to being yourself, but being yourself as the path. 
In her two decades of being a student and teacher of IDOLOGY, Caroline has worked all over the world with thousands of individuals, from celebrated artists to Fortune 500 CEOs to schoolchildren in India, using her unique perspective to shine a light on theirs. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

There Is Always Hope: How Music Saved My Life

There Is Always Hope: How Music Saved My Life | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
A couple of months ago, I was asked by To Write Love On Her Arms to do a post on my experience with depression, music, and being a suicide survivor.

 On July 9, 2013, I grabbed sushi with a dear friend from college. It had been at least a year since we’d seen one another due to his relocation to another state. We had a wonderful dinner, his charisma weaving grandiose patterns of laughter and jokes to make up for lost time. To this day, he remains the only friend who could ever get away with his hysterical manner of picking me up and spinning me around. It was simply his way of saying “Hello.”

       The following afternoon, as I was on my way to Stanford University to cover a behavioral science and creativity conference, I received an urgent phone call from the Los Angeles Police Department. After an inundation of bewildering questions and the request that I be sitting down, I was alerted that my friend had sustained a perplexing and potentially fatal injury. The following two months would consist of a blur of countless ER, ICU and eventually hospice visits, and even more fatigued phone calls from detectives, friends, and families in attempt to speculate every detail as to my friend’s condition. After failing to regain consciousness, my friend died on August 21, 2013 of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. He was twenty seven.

...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study | Emotion Science

We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Frontiers | Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia patients do not succumb to the Allais paradox | Decision Neuroscience

The Allais Paradox represents on of the earliest empirical challenges to normative models of decision-making, and suggests that choices in one part of a gamble may depend on the possible outcome in another, independent, part of the gamble—a violation of the so-called “independence axiom”. To account for Allaisian behavior, one well-known class of models propose that individuals’ choices are influenced not only by possible outcomes resulting from one’s choices, but also the anticipation of regret for foregone options. Here we test the regret hypothesis using a population of patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a clinical population known to present ventromedial prefrontal cortex dysfunctions and associated with impaired regret processing in previous studies of decision-making. Compared to behavior of matched controls and Alzheimer (AD) patients that has no ventromedial prefrontal atrophy, we found a striking diminution of Allaisian behavior among bvFTD patients. These results are consistent with the regret hypothesis and furthermore suggest a crucial role for prefrontal regions in choices that typically stands in contradiction with a basic axiom of rational decision-making.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain

Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

Are humans programmed to tell the truth? Not when lying is advantageous, says a new study led by Assistant Professor Ming Hsu at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. The report ties honesty to a region of the brain that exerts control over automatic impulses.

Hsu, who heads the Neuroeconomics Laboratory at the Haas School of Business and holds a joint appointment with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, said the results, just published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, indicate that willpower is necessary for honesty when it is personally advantageous to lie.


Read more at http://scienceblog.com/74268/study-links-honesty-prefrontal-region-brain/#7frbBu5jEVtIbvJp.99
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

LEADER HEURISTICS, POLITICAL KNOWLEDGE AND VOTING IN BRITAIN'S AV REFERENDUM

This paper uses data gathered in a large national survey to investigate the impact of party leader images on voting in Britain's 2011 national referendum on the Alternative Vote electoral system. Previous studies have found that leader heuristics have significant
effects on voting in major referendums and general elections, and some analysts have argued that these effects are stronger for voters with lower levels of political knowledge.
However, consistent with recent research in experimental conomics, it can be hypothesized that more knowledgeable voters actually rely more heavily on leader heuristics than do less knowledgeable individuals. Using multivariate statistical techniques suitable for analyzing interaction effects in nonlinear models, we show that a
political knowledge index focusing on the electoral system does not have statistically significant effects on referendum voting. However, knowledge of leaders' positions on AV does interact with their images. The nature of these effects is consistent with the conjecture that more knowledgeable voters place greater emphasis on leader heuristics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

The Label “Rational” Is Being Used Illogically | Big Think

The Label “Rational” Is Being Used Illogically | Big Think | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
The label “rational” is being used illogically. Economists (even the better behavioural kind) often misapply it, ignoring Shakespeare’s wisdom (he understood human nature better) and our evolved relational rationality.
1. Consider the Ultimatum Game: a Proposer is given money and must ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Incremental Shifts in pH Spring Water Can Be Stored as “Space-Memory”: Encoding and Retrieval Through the Application of the Same Rotating Magnetic Field | Dotta | NeuroQuantology

Incremental Shifts in pH Spring Water Can Be Stored as “Space-Memory”: Encoding and Retrieval Through the Application of the Same Rotating Magnetic Field | Dotta | NeuroQuantology | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT

Both four-dimensional (space-time) models and Casimir-like processes predict that the representations of stimulusresponse

pairing remain in altered or virtual states that can be potentially retrieved. Over a six month period we

demonstrated “excess correlations” between mild acidification in quantities (50 ml) of spring water in a local space

and the temporally contiguous incremental alkalinisation in nonlocal quantities of water when both loci were exposed

to the same experimental paradigm that produced “entanglement” in photon reactions. The procedure required

simultaneous exposures of both loci to specific patterns of rotating magnetic fields displaying specific rates of change

in angular velocity. If the ~0.1 unit increases in pH within the non-local water samples due to injections of acetic acid

in the local samples had been established on one day, comparable shifts occurred in the non-local water samples the

following day when there were no injections of acetic acid if the space was exposed to the original magnetic field

configurations. These results suggest that, like photon patterns, the “memory” or representation of pH (H+) shifts

remain in space long after the stimulus has been removed and can be retrieved within that space if the specific

electromagnetic field is repeated.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alessandro Cerboni
Scoop.it!

Hypercitizenship and the Management of Genetic Diversity: Sociology of Law and the Key Systemic Bifurcation Between the Ring Singularity and the Neofeudal Age

This article is essentially theoretical and is focused on the allocative function of the legal systems to attract/reject different capitals according to their proceduresto shape norms and laws. This function of the legal systems is pivotal in ourtimes as humankind is facing a systemic and evolutionary bifurcation betweenthe heideggerian Gegnet of a strategic, high speed convergence (i.e., Singularity)among robotics, informatics, nanotechnologies, and genetics (RINGs)—whichwill reshape human life in terms of its life quality styles and standards especiallyregarding health and environment matters, and the so called Neofeudal Scenario(NS) supported by those for whom the Industrial Model failed and the only wayto save humankind and its environment would be a kind return to a Medievallife style based on a slow pace of life and austerity. This article provides anoverview of the most important and recent international references regarding thetwo alternatives of bifurcation and describes a potential paradigm shift inside thesystemic approach to reframe the conceptual map of global change through asystemic epistemology of the sociology of law
more...
No comment yet.