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Organizational Survival in the New World: The Intelligent Complex Adaptive System (KMCI Press)

Organizational Survival in the New World: The Intelligent Complex Adaptive System (KMCI Press) | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

Organizational Survival in the New World: The Intelligent Complex Adaptive System (KMCI Press), Review Alex and David Bennet are ideally suited to bring forth such a wide-ranging and erudite synthesis of complexity and knowledge theories.


Via Gianluca Biotto
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This is your brain on snacks: Brain stimulation affects craving, consumption | neuroscientistnews.com

This is your brain on snacks: Brain stimulation affects craving, consumption | neuroscientistnews.com | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. After stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), young women experience increased cravings for high-calorie snacks -- and eat more of those foods when given the opportunity, according to the study by researchers at University of Waterloo, Ont., Canada. "These findings shed a light on the role of the DLPFC in food cravings (specifically reward anticipation), the consumption of appealing high caloric foods, and the relation between self-control and food consumption," the researchers write. The senior author was Peter Hall, PhD. Brain Stimulation Affects Cravings and Consumption for 'Appetitive' Snacks The study included 21 healthy young women, selected because they reported strong and frequent cravings for chocolate and potato chips. Such "appetitive," calorie-dense snack foods are often implicated in the development of obesity. - See more at: http://www.neuroscientistnews.com/research-news/your-brain-snacks-brain-stimulation-affects-craving-consumption#sthash.GENRJhPs.dpuf
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NEUROECONOMICS, ILLUSTRATED BY THE STUDY OF AMBIGUITY-AVERSION

This paper is about the emerging field of #neuroeconomics, which seeks to ground economic  theory in details about how the brain works. This approach is a sharp turn in economic thought. Around
the turn of the century, economists made a clear methodological choice, to treat the mind as a black box and ignore its details for the purpose of economic theory (13). In an 1897 letter Pareto wrote
It is an empirical fact that the natural sciences have progressed only when they have taken secondary principles as their point of departure, instead of trying to discover the essence of things. ... Pure political economy has therefore a great interest in relying as
little as possible on the domain of psychology (quoted in Busino, 1964, p. xxiv (14)). Pareto’s view that psychology should be ignored was reflective of a pessimism of his time, about the ability to ever understand the brain. As William Jevons wrote a little earlier, in 1871

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Stumbling and Mumbling: The referendum, & risk attitudes

THE REFERENDUM, & RISK ATTITUDES

To what extent is the Scottish referendum about the benefits of independence and to what extent is it about people's attitudes to risk?

To see my question, think of independence as an investment with a risky payoff - which is what it is. 
There are two reasons why one might reject such an investment. One, trivially, is simply that you expect a negative payoff. The other is that you expect a positive payoff but think the risks around it are too high.

It is perfectly possible for two people to agree upon payoffs and risks and yet one would accept the proposal and the other reject it because one is more risk-tolerant than the other. This is commonplace in asset allocation. Two investors might agree upon expected returns and volatility and yet one might hold more equities and fewer safe assets than the other simply because of differences in tastes.

Mightn't the same be true for many people for Scottish independence? Two Scots might agree on the payoffs and risks to independence but one might vote yes and the other no because of differences in risk tolerance.The statement "Independence probably would be a good thing, but I don't want to risk it" seems tenable to me.

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Neuroscience Provides Clues To Organization

Neuroscience Provides Clues To Organization | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
We’ve all heard the conventional wisdom for better managing our time and organizing our professional and personal lives. 
We’ve all heard the conventional wisdom for better managing our time and organizing our professional and personal lives. Don’t try to multitask. Turn off the email and Facebook alerts. But what’s grounded in real evidence and what’s not? In his new book The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin — a McGill University professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience — explores how having a basic understanding of the way the brain works can help us think about organizing our homes, our businesses, our time and even our schools in an age of information overload. We spoke with Levitin about his work. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. Question: What was your goal in writing this book? Answer: Neuroscientists have learned a lot in the last 10 or 15 years about how the brain organizes information, and why we pay attention to some things and forget others. But most of this information hasn’t trickled down to the average reader. There are a lot of books about how to get organized and a lot of books about how to be better and more productive at business, but I don’t know of one that grounds any of these in the science. From the book, you seem to be a fan of David Allen, the time management guru. Does his Getting Things Donesystem have a real basis in neuroscience? 
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Neuroscientists reverse memories’ emotional associations

Neuroscientists reverse memories’ emotional associations | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
MIT study also identifies the brain circuit that links feelings to memories. 

Most memories have some kind of emotion associated with them: Recalling the week you just spent at the beach probably makes you feel happy, while reflecting on being bullied provokes more negative feelings.

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions. Furthermore, the researchers found that they could reverse the emotional association of specific memories by manipulating brain cells with optogenetics — a technique that uses light to control neuron activity.

The findings, described in the Aug. 27 issue of Nature, demonstrated that a neuronal circuit connecting the hippocampus and the amygdala plays a critical role in associating emotion with memory. This circuit could offer a target for new drugs to help treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, the researchers say.

“In the future, one may be able to develop methods that help people to remember positive memories more strongly than negative ones,” says Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience, director of the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, and senior author of the paper. 

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Personality Has Minor Effects on Panel Attrition

Abstract: In light of the recent interest in using longitudinal panel data to study personality development, it is important to know if personality traits are related to panel attrition. We analyse the effects of personality on panel drop-out separately for an 'older' subsample (started in 1984), a relatively 'young' subsample (started in 2000), and a 'new' subsample (started in 2009) of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study. We found that openness slightly decreases the probability of panel drop-out in all three samples. For the 'older' subsample only, we found a small negative effect of agreeableness on panel drop-out. We control for age, sex, education, migration background, and the number of inhabitants in the region of the respondents.

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NEUROECONOMICS OF DECISION-MAKING IN THE AGING BRAIN: THE EXAMPLE OF LONG-TERM CARE

ABSTRACT

Purpose – Long-term care (LTC) services assist people with limitations in the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) as a result of chronic illness or disabilities. We discuss possible behavioral explanations for the under-purchasing of LTC insurance, as well as the current state of knowledge on the neural mechanisms behind these behavioral factors.

Findings/approach – Ideas from behavioral economics are discussed, including risk-seeking over losses, ambiguity-preferring over losses, hyperbolic discounting, and the effect of the aging process on the underlying neural mechanisms supporting these decisions. We further emphasize the role of age, as aging is a highly heterogeneous process. It is associated with changes in both brain tissue as well as cognitive abilities, and both are characterized by large individual differences. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms is vital to understanding this heterogeneity and identifying possible methods of interventions.

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Should Public Policy Promote Better Habits?

Should Public Policy Promote Better Habits? | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

In other words, neoclassical economics is all wrong.

O.K., that's an overstatement. But both concerns about the health effects of urban layouts and attempts to deter certain kinds of consumption are basically about the failings of rationality as a model of human behavior. People should get enough exercise - they will, in general, be happier if they do - but they tend not to get exercise if they live in an environment where it's easy to drive everywhere and not as easy to walk. People should also limit their caloric intake - again, they'll be happier if they do - but they have a hard time resisting those giant tubs of popcorn.

I can personally attest to the importance of these environmental effects. These days, I walk around with a pedometer on my wrist - hey, I'm 61, and it's now or never - and it's obvious just how much more natural it is to get exercise when I'm in New York than when I'm in Princeton, N.J. Choosing to walk just a couple times rather than take the subway fairly easily gets me to 15,000 steps in the city, while even with a morning run it can be hard to break 10,000 in the suburbs. Also, the nanny-state legacy of former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, with calories displayed on practically everything in New York, does help curb my vices (greasy breakfast sandwiches!).

 

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The End of Psychology? » IAI TV

The End of Psychology? » IAI TV | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

The end of psychology? Perhaps not quite yet, but there is a serious message behind The Onion’s fantasy about the American Psychology Association (APA). Over the past decades, psychology has been increasingly overtaken by neuroscience. Two multi-billion euro/dollar initiatives – one European, one American – were launched in 2012 with the avowed objectives of “solving the brain” and, in the EU’s case, incorporating the solution into novel “neuromorphic” computers.

Hard-line reductionists speak of “molecular and cellular cognition” and dismiss the mind as an epiphenomenal product of neural processes, a “user illusion,” or, as zoologist Thomas Huxley put it a century and a half ago, merely the whistle to the steam train. Most neuroscientists concur; as Francis Crick put it: “You are nothing but a bunch of neurons.” Neurophilosophers, a world away from Descartes famous Cogito ergo sum speak contemptuously of “folk psychology”, to be replaced as neuroscience progresses by an objective, rigorously defined brain language.

 
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Is Economics a Science?

Is Economics a Science? | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

One problem with economics is that it is necessarily focused on policy, rather than discovery of fundamentals. Nobody really cares much about economic data except as a guide to policy: economic phenomena do not have the same intrinsic fascination for us as the internal resonances of the atom or the functioning of the vesicles and other organelles of a living cell. We judge economics by what it can produce. As such, economics is rather more like engineering than physics, more practical than spiritual.

There is no Nobel Prize for engineering, though there should be. True, the chemistry prize this year looks a bit like an engineering prize, because it was given to three researchers – Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel – “for the development of multiscale models of complex chemical systems” that underlie the computer programs that make nuclear magnetic resonance hardware work. But the Nobel Foundation is forced to look at much more such practical, applied material when it considers the economics prize.

The problem is that once we focus on economic policy, much that is not science comes into play. Politics becomes involved, and political posturing is amply rewarded by public attention. The Nobel Prize is designed to reward those who do not play tricks for attention, and who, in their sincere pursuit of the truth, might otherwise be slighted.


Read more at http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/robert-j--shilleron-whether-he-is-a-scientist#ytyt9w1S1gt9t8QY.99
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Advancing consumer neuroscience

Abstract In the first decade of consumer neuroscience, strong progress has been made in understanding how neuroscience can inform consumer decision making. Here, we sketch the development of this discipline and compare it to that of the adjacent field of neuroeconomics. We describe three new frontiers for ongoing progress at both theoretical and applied levels. First, the field will broaden its boundaries to include genetics and molecular neuroscience, each of which will provide important new insights into individual differences in decision making. Second, recent advances in computational methods will improve the accuracy and out-of-sample generalizability of predicting decisions from brain activity. Third, sophisticated meta-analyses will help consumer neuroscientists to synthesize the growing body of knowledge, providing evidence for consistency and specificity of brain activations and their reliability as measurements of consumer behavior

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The Problem With Reclining Airplane Seat Design

The Problem With Reclining Airplane Seat Design | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

To recline or not to recline? That is the question now being hotly debated among air travelers after three flights were forced to land after passengers on board began fighting about reclining seats.

But are passengers really the problem? The real issue may be that most airline seats are not designed to fully accommodate the human body in its various shapes and sizes.

“We are fighting each other, but the seats are not designed right,” said Kathleen M. Robinette, professor and head of the department of design, housing and merchandising at Oklahoma State University. “The seats don’t fit us.”

Dr. Robinette would know. She is the lead author of a landmark anthropometric survey conducted by the Air Force with a consortium of 35 organizations and published in 2002. It is widely used by seat makers and other designers.

 
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The Quick Eye Movement That Reveals Whether It’s Love or Lust — PsyBlog

The Quick Eye Movement That Reveals Whether It’s Love or Lust — PsyBlog | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

How to tell just from the eyes whether it’s love or lust .When a stranger looks into your eyes, it could signal romantic love, but if their eyes then slide down your body, they’re probably feeling sexual desire, a new study finds. This automatic judgement can happen in as little as half a second and likely recruits different networks of activity in the brain.

Stephanie Cacioppo, who led the study, which is published in the journalPsychological Science, said:

“Although little is currently known about the science of love at first sight or how people fall in love, these patterns of response provide the first clues regarding how automatic attentional processes, such as eye gaze, may differentiate feelings of love from feelings of desire toward strangers.”

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Neuroeconomics: hype or hope?

This Special Issue of the Journal of Economic Methodology brings together a selection of papers presented at the Conference Neuroeconomics: Hype or Hope?, which was hosted by the Erasmus Institute for Philosophy and Economics (EIPE) in November 2008 in
Rotterdam. The conference speakers comprised ardent advocates and practitioners of neuroeconomics, outspoken critics and skeptics, and philosophers and methodologists taking a stance somewhere in between these extremes. The central question was whether neuroeconomics is a flimsy fad that is likely to pass without leaving a discernible trace in economics, or a promising new field with the potential to enrich and improve economic theory.
Neuroeconomics is hot. Over the last few years, all over the world many leading universities have started their own lab or centre for euroeconomics. Papers explicitly presented under the banner of neuroeconomics frequently appear in leading science journals such as Nature and Science. Neuroeconomics has also received quite some attention in the popular press. Not surprisingly, economists have started to reflect on neuroeconomics and its relevance for economics. To date, the paper by Gul and Pesendorfer (2008) is perhaps the staunchest denial of any potential relevance of neuroscientific findings for economics. Gul and Pesendorfer argue that economists should keep their focus on observable choice behavior and retain their agnosticism about decision-making processes. Since neuroscientific data are about decision-making processes, they should be completely disregarded in empirical assessments of economic theories

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Behavioural tracking and neuroscience tools designed to measure what consumers want and need

Behavioural tracking and neuroscience tools designed to measure what consumers want and need | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

A worth reading article by Dara O’Rourke today well explains why it’s time “we move beyond surveys, and simultaneously commit to avoiding invasive tracking and manipulative marketing, in order to really understand what consumers want and need, and to help them connect their values and actions for sustainability. A new set of tools and technologies has emerged over the last several years to measure the behaviours of consumers. These tools, if used responsibly, transparently, and without violating people’s privacy, hold important potential for better understanding consumer behavior with respect to sustainability”.

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Affective basis of Judgment-Behavior Discrepancy in Virtual Experiences of Moral Dilemmas

Affective basis of Judgment-Behavior Discrepancy in Virtual Experiences of Moral Dilemmas | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
AbstractAlthough research in moral psychology in the last decade has relied heavily on hypothetical moral dilemmas and has been effective in understanding moral judgment, how these judgments translate into behaviors remains a largely unexplored issue due to the harmful nature of the acts involved. To study this link, we follow a new approach based on a desktop virtual reality environment. In our within-subjects experiment, participants exhibited an order-dependent judgment-behavior discrepancy across temporally-separated sessions, with many of them behaving in utilitarian manner in virtual reality dilemmas despite their non-utilitarian judgments for the same dilemmas in textual descriptions. This change in decisions reflected in the autonomic arousal of participants, with dilemmas in virtual reality being perceived more emotionally arousing than the ones in text, after controlling for general differences between the two presentation modalities (virtual reality vs. text). This suggests that moral decision-making in hypothetical moral dilemmas is susceptible to contextual saliency of the presentation of these dilemmas.

 

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The rise of emotional awareness

The rise of emotional awareness | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

Our emotions are subject to the ebbs and flow of daily life. Even the subtlest differences in our environments can have a visceral effect on our emotional state and interactions, with new tools and sensor quantifying by exactly how much.

New systems are being developed which use sensors and advanced algorithms to understand, react to and even anticipate our moods and emotional states.

These technologies have a built-in emotional responsiveness that will change the way we think of interactivity, allowing us to connect with our surroundings, with each other and even with ourselves, in an exciting and dynamic new way.

Margaret Morris, research scientist at Intel Labs, has explored the intersection of technology and emotions, examining how computing devices might enhance our personal and professional relationships. In the interview below, Morris talks about what it means to allow technology to get to know us and how will it can help us learn more about ourselves.

 

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Fragility of the Commons under Prospect-Theoretic Risk Attitudes

Abstract: We study a common-pool resource game where the resource experiences failure with a probability that grows with the aggregate investment in the resource. To capture decision making under such uncertainty, we model each player's risk preference according to the value function from prospect theory. We show the existence and uniqueness of a pure strategy Nash equilibrium when the players have arbitrary (potentially heterogeneous) risk preferences and under natural assumptions on the rate of return and failure probability of the resource. Greater competition, vis-a-vis the number of players, increases the failure probability at the Nash equilibrium, and we quantify this effect by obtaining (tight) upper bounds on the failure probability at the equilibrium for a large number of players with respect to the failure probability under investment by a single player. We further examine the effects of heterogeneity in risk preferences of the players with respect to two characteristics of the prospect-theoretic value function: loss aversion and diminishing sensitivity. Heterogeneity in attitudes towards loss aversion always leads to higher failure probability of the resource at the equilibrium when compared to the case where players have identical risk preferences, whereas there is no clear trend under heterogeneity in the diminishing sensitivity parameter.

 
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Brain structure could predict risky behavior | neuroscientistnews.com

Brain structure could predict risky behavior | neuroscientistnews.com | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.

Led by Ifat Levy, assistant professor in comparative medicine and neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine, the team found that those with larger volume in a particular part of the parietal cortex were willing to take more risks than those with less volume in this part of the brain. The findings are published in the Sept. 10 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Although several cognitive and personality traits are reflected in brain structure, there has been little research linking brain structure to economic preferences. Levy and her colleagues sought to examine this question in their study.

Study participants included young adult men and women from the northeastern United States. Participants made a series of choices between monetary lotteries that varied in their degree of risk, and the research team conducted standard anatomical MRI brain scans. The results were first obtained in a group of 28 participants, and then confirmed in a second, independent, group of 33 participants.

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Thinking like a trader selectively reduces individuals’loss aversion

Research on emotion regulation has focused upon observers’ ability to regulate their emotional reaction to stimuli such as affective pictures, but many other aspects of our affective experience are also potentially amenable to intentional cognitive regulation. In the domain of decision-making, recent work has demonstrated a role for emotions in choice, although such work has generally remained agnostic about the specific role of emotion. Combining psychologically-derived cognitive strategies, physiological measurements of arousal, and an economic model of behavior, this study examined changes in choices (specifically, loss aversion) and physiological correlates of behavior as the result of an intentional cognitive regulation strategy. Participants were on average more aroused per dollar to losses relative to gains, as measured with skin conductance response, and the difference in arousal to losses versus gains correlated with behavioral loss aversion across subjects. These results suggest a specific role for arousal responses in loss aversion. Most importantly, the intentional cognitive regulation strategy, which emphasized ‘‘perspective-taking,’’ uniquely reduced both behavioral loss aversion and arousal to losses relative to gains, largely by influencing arousal to losses. Our results confirm previous research demonstrating loss aversion while providing new evidence characterizing individual differences and arousal correlates and illustrating the effectiveness of intentional regulation strategies in reducing loss aversion both behaviorally and physiologically

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The Art of Being Yourself: Caroline McHugh at TEDxMiltonKeynesWomen - YouTube

aroline McHugh wrote a lovely book about the art of being yourself. We had a great conversation about how the True Mirror was such a great new tool for both discovering and for further knowing your real self, that she included True Mirror in the book. Its a wonderful book that you will be happy to own and show off on your coffee table and bookshelf
From a the book blurb:

How many times has someone offered you that wonderfully insightful piece of advice to 'just be yourself'? Like it hadn't crossed your mind already? 
Here is a wee book with a big idea—that you should be nobody but yourself—offering inspiration and direction for everybody who wants to be more specifically somebody. 
At a time when we're looking for a more honest approach to everything from food to music to politics, Never Not a Lovely Moon offers not a path to being yourself, but being yourself as the path. 
In her two decades of being a student and teacher of IDOLOGY, Caroline has worked all over the world with thousands of individuals, from celebrated artists to Fortune 500 CEOs to schoolchildren in India, using her unique perspective to shine a light on theirs. 
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There Is Always Hope: How Music Saved My Life

There Is Always Hope: How Music Saved My Life | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it
A couple of months ago, I was asked by To Write Love On Her Arms to do a post on my experience with depression, music, and being a suicide survivor.

 On July 9, 2013, I grabbed sushi with a dear friend from college. It had been at least a year since we’d seen one another due to his relocation to another state. We had a wonderful dinner, his charisma weaving grandiose patterns of laughter and jokes to make up for lost time. To this day, he remains the only friend who could ever get away with his hysterical manner of picking me up and spinning me around. It was simply his way of saying “Hello.”

       The following afternoon, as I was on my way to Stanford University to cover a behavioral science and creativity conference, I received an urgent phone call from the Los Angeles Police Department. After an inundation of bewildering questions and the request that I be sitting down, I was alerted that my friend had sustained a perplexing and potentially fatal injury. The following two months would consist of a blur of countless ER, ICU and eventually hospice visits, and even more fatigued phone calls from detectives, friends, and families in attempt to speculate every detail as to my friend’s condition. After failing to regain consciousness, my friend died on August 21, 2013 of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. He was twenty seven.

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Frontiers | Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study | Emotion Science

We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set.
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Frontiers | Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia patients do not succumb to the Allais paradox | Decision Neuroscience

The Allais Paradox represents on of the earliest empirical challenges to normative models of decision-making, and suggests that choices in one part of a gamble may depend on the possible outcome in another, independent, part of the gamble—a violation of the so-called “independence axiom”. To account for Allaisian behavior, one well-known class of models propose that individuals’ choices are influenced not only by possible outcomes resulting from one’s choices, but also the anticipation of regret for foregone options. Here we test the regret hypothesis using a population of patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a clinical population known to present ventromedial prefrontal cortex dysfunctions and associated with impaired regret processing in previous studies of decision-making. Compared to behavior of matched controls and Alzheimer (AD) patients that has no ventromedial prefrontal atrophy, we found a striking diminution of Allaisian behavior among bvFTD patients. These results are consistent with the regret hypothesis and furthermore suggest a crucial role for prefrontal regions in choices that typically stands in contradiction with a basic axiom of rational decision-making.
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Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain

Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain | Bounded Rationality and Beyond | Scoop.it

Are humans programmed to tell the truth? Not when lying is advantageous, says a new study led by Assistant Professor Ming Hsu at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. The report ties honesty to a region of the brain that exerts control over automatic impulses.

Hsu, who heads the Neuroeconomics Laboratory at the Haas School of Business and holds a joint appointment with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, said the results, just published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, indicate that willpower is necessary for honesty when it is personally advantageous to lie.


Read more at http://scienceblog.com/74268/study-links-honesty-prefrontal-region-brain/#7frbBu5jEVtIbvJp.99
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