Networks, Complexity, Agents
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Researchers devise method to study network resistance to random failures based on 'random walks'

Researchers devise method to study network resistance to random failures based on 'random walks' | Networks, Complexity, Agents | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —A small team of mathematicians with Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Spain, has come up with a way to study a network's resistance to failure. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe the concept of 'random walks' and how it can ...
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The Secret Science of Retweets | MIT Technology Review

The Secret Science of Retweets | MIT Technology Review | Networks, Complexity, Agents | Scoop.it
There’s a secret to persuading strangers to retweet your messages. And a machine learning algorithm has discovered it.
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The Emerging Science of Superspreaders (And How to Tell If You're One Of Them)

The Emerging Science of Superspreaders (And How to Tell If You're One Of Them) | Networks, Complexity, Agents | Scoop.it
Nobody has figured out how to spot the most influential spreaders of information in a real-world network. Now that looks set to change with important implications, not least for the superspreaders themselves.

 

http://www.technologyreview.com/view/527271/the-emerging-science-of-superspreaders-and-how-to-tell-if-youre-one-of-them/


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Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | Networks, Complexity, Agents | Scoop.it
  This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers ...
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Network paradox may help algorithms overcome 'universal limitation'

Network paradox may help algorithms overcome 'universal limitation' | Networks, Complexity, Agents | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Sometimes paradoxes can be frustrating, but other times they can reveal something that was previously hidden. A new paradox in the field of network science, presented in a recent issue of EPL by Filippo Radicchi, Assistant Professor at Indiana University, seems to fall into the latter ...
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Containing Epidemic Outbreaks by Message-Passing Techniques

Containing Epidemic Outbreaks by Message-Passing Techniques | Networks, Complexity, Agents | Scoop.it

The problem of targeted network immunization can be defined as the one of finding a subset of nodes in a network to immunize or vaccinate in order to minimize a tradeoff between the cost of vaccination and the final (stationary) expected infection under a given epidemic model. Although computing the expected infection is a hard computational problem, simple and efficient mean-field approximations have been put forward in the literature in recent years. The optimization problem can be recast into a constrained one in which the constraints enforce local mean-field equations describing the average stationary state of the epidemic process. For a wide class of epidemic models, including the susceptible-infected-removed and the susceptible-infected-susceptible models, we define a message-passing approach to network immunization that allows us to study the statistical properties of epidemic outbreaks in the presence of immunized nodes as well as to find (nearly) optimal immunization sets for a given choice of parameters and costs. The algorithm scales linearly with the size of the graph, and it can be made efficient even on large networks. We compare its performance with topologically based heuristics, greedy methods, and simulated annealing on both random graphs and real-world networks.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevX.4.021024
Containing Epidemic Outbreaks by Message-Passing Techniques
F. Altarelli, A. Braunstein, L. Dall’Asta, J. R. Wakeling, and R. Zecchina

Phys. Rev. X 4, 021024 – Published 8 May 2014


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