networks and network weaving
6.0K views | +1 today
Follow
networks and network weaving
How networks can transform our world
Curated by june holley
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

New School In Ghana Learns Art And English Via App

New School In Ghana Learns Art And English Via App | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
You know that time you kill on your phone? Candy Crush blah blah, or just vacantly swiping through a negative news feed? The Elbi community are putting that time to good use and helping a new school in Ghana with English and Art lessons, straight from their phones.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
Scoop.it!

Cooperation, competition and the emergence of criticality in communities of adaptive systems

The hypothesis that living systems can benefit from operating at the vicinity of critical points has gained momentum in recent years. Criticality may confer an optimal balance between exceedingly ordered and too noisy states. We here present a model, based on information theory and statistical mechanics, illustrating how and why a community of agents aimed at understanding and communicating with each other converges to a globally coherent state in which all individuals are close to an internal critical state, i.e. at the borderline between order and disorder. We study --both analytically and computationally-- the circumstances under which criticality is the best possible outcome of the dynamical process, confirming the convergence to critical points under very generic conditions. Finally, we analyze the effect of cooperation (agents try to enhance not only their fitness, but also that of other individuals) and competition (agents try to improve their own fitness and to diminish those of competitors) within our setting. The conclusion is that, while competition fosters criticality, cooperation hinders it and can lead to more ordered or more disordered consensual solutions.


Cooperation, competition and the emergence of criticality in communities of adaptive systems
Jorge Hidalgo, Jacopo Grilli, Samir Suweis, Amos Maritan, Miguel A. Munoz

http://arxiv.org/abs/1510.05941


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

What Are Self-Organising Teams?

What Are Self-Organising Teams? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
There is relatively little material on what self-organising teams are about and how to support them effectively. This first article from a series of on Leading Self-Organising Teams explores what self-organising teams are.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Keynote: Embrace Complexity, Scale Agility by Dave Snowden - Trailer - YouTube

In order to successful scale any method or practice, it has to have some basis in theory. This presentation will use insights from complex adaptive systems t...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Complex Adaptive Systems: 3 Overview

In this module we will be giving a overview to complex adaptive systems, we will firstly define what we mean they this term, before briefly covering the main ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Collaborationweb
Scoop.it!

The Trinity Model of Networks

The Trinity Model of Networks | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Following up on my last post, the network era trinity, I have put together two images to synthesize the multiple concepts behind them. These images are my attempt to create a simple model that explains how networked organizations need to operate differently.

Via David Hain
more...
David Hain's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:18 AM

Harold Jarche (@hjarche) - bringing networks to life via visualisation. Excellent and worth 1 minute viewing, hours of reflection!

Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

The Open Works

The Open Works | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Over 12 months from February 2014 - February 2015, 1000 people took part in building a live prototype of mass participation in West Norwood. Together they created a network of 20 projects, and began to transform the neighbourhood.

Through the process of live testing, we have learnt a lot about how to build this type of neighbourhood - connected, creative, resilient and sociable.

The research report "Designed to Scale - mass participation to build resilient neighbourhoods" is available to read online.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

How Platform Coops Can Beat Death Stars Like Uber to Create a Real Sharing Economy

How Platform Coops Can Beat Death Stars Like Uber to Create a Real Sharing Economy | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The Battle of Yavin where the first Death Star was destroyed. Credit: Fanpop We have an epic choice before us between platform coops and Death Star platforms, and the time to decide is now. It might be the most important economic decision we ever make, but most of us don't even know we have a choice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Silicon Valley’s New Philanthropy

Silicon Valley’s New Philanthropy | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The tech billionaires believe their greatest charitable gift is their own ingenuity.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Book Review: "Networked: The New Social Operating System" – Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman | Governance in a Networked World

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

Could We Open Source Democracy? - WVXU

Could We Open Source Democracy? - WVXU | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Open Source World About Pia Mancini's TED Talk Pia Mancini wants to upgrade democracy with the open source mobile

Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

New Economic Paradigms | Demos

New Economic Paradigms | Demos | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

n October 2013, Demos hosted a high-level convening on New Economic Paradigms, in partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation. In a spirit of dialogue with the broader research and advocacy community, we are happy to make some of the materials we developed for the convening more widely available here.


Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

U.N. Launches App to Feed Hungry With a Simple Tap

U.N. Launches App to Feed Hungry With a Simple Tap | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
A donation of 50 cents a day sounds a lot more palatable than roughly $150 a year, or $12 a month. Who doesn’t have two spare quarters? That pocket change could help to end world hunger—but the traditional model of soliciting donations by mail means that what amounts to a daily donation of 50 cents is barely enough to cover the cost of stamps and paper. Instead of costly mailers, return envelopes, and stamps, a new app called Share the Meal is billing itself as the first mobile crowdfunding app to end global hunger. U.N. leaders hope to use this low-overhead means to help Syrians fleeing the current conflict and other refugees in the future. The free app is available for iOS and Android starting Thursday. As the app mentions upon login, “Smartphone users outnumber hungry children by 20 to 1,” and its goal isn’t just to get people to help feed hungry children via the World Food Programme—first in Lesotho and, once the funding goal is met there, other hunger-ravaged countries—but to get people to give and keep giving. “We don’t want you to donate on one day,” said Massimiliano Costa, the app’s growth manager. “The biggest potential for such a product is to make a habit of donating.” More than 64 percent of Americans own smartphones, and those people check their phones an average of 100 times a day. Nonprofits are hoping they can harness app and mobile-Web addictions to make giving as easy as checking another push notification on your lock screen. Test runs in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland gathered 120,000 users to donate the equivalent of 1.7 million daily rations to children in Lesotho. The app was developed by two former business consultants to the U.N.’s antihunger program during a sabbatical and took one year from inception to launch. The time it takes to actually develop an app like this is the biggest obstacle for nonprofits, many of whom don’t have the resources of a large organization such as the U.N. They had to test the app in a few markets before the global launch, make it available in eight different languages, and make other time-consuming efforts. “It’s so obvious that microdonations can work, and it’s been a trend for a long time, but no one has really picked up on it,” said Maria Pepine, a spokesperson for Share the Meal. “It needs a lot of resources and lots of support to make it happen.” There are a few major benefits to using an app to bring in donations. “The overhead cost is so low that at least 90 percent of donations go to delivering food where it’s needed,” Costa said. By comparison, 70 percent of the organizations evaluated by the website Charity Navigator spend just 75 percent of donations “on the programs and services they exist to provide.” The other advantages are convenience for the user and, for the organization, ease of access to potential donors. Costa explained that even when a video or advertisement does manage to speak to a donor enough to prompt him to donate, it’s a one-time occasion. “We think the app can be different because it keeps you in the loop.” It can connect and update information to social media and send push notifications to nudge users to keep giving. The app’s single-country focus is another interesting departure from the traditional charity model. Share the Meal will set a goal for each location and plans to focus the app’s donations on that locale until the goal is met. Because of the enormity of the Syrian crisis, Share the Meal has plans to focus efforts there once its goals in Lesotho are met.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
Scoop.it!

Society: Build digital democracy

Society: Build digital democracy | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

To ensure that no government, company or person with sole control of digital filters can manipulate our decisions, we need information systems that are transparent, trustworthy and user-controlled. Each of us must be able to choose, modify and build our own tools for winnowing information.


Society: Build digital democracy
Dirk Helbing & Evangelos Pournaras

http://www.nature.com/news/society-build-digital-democracy-1.18690 


See Also: 

Building a Smart Digital Society Together

https://youtu.be/4slnjohWeZk 


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Network Analysis. Lecture 1. Introduction to Network Science - YouTube

Introduction to network science. Complex networks. Examples. Main properties. Scale-free networks. Small world. Six degrees of separation. Milgram study. Lec...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Feelings, magic & gendered work: processes & structures of a collaborative workplace

Feelings, magic & gendered work: processes & structures of a collaborative workplace | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
A Facebook friend asked this question on Friday: “What do you think are the most critical things (I’m talking specific processes, policies, and structures rather than values) that make up non-compe...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
Scoop.it!

Recent Progress on the Resilience of Complex Networks

Many complex systems in the real world can be modeled as complex networks, which has captured in recent years enormous attention from researchers of diverse fields ranging from natural sciences to engineering. The extinction of species in ecosystems and the blackouts of power girds in engineering exhibit the vulnerability of complex networks, investigated by empirical data and analyzed by theoretical models. For studying the resilience of complex networks, three main factors should be focused on: the network structure, the network dynamics and the failure mechanism. In this review, we will introduce recent progress on the resilience of complex networks based on these three aspects. For the network structure, increasing evidence shows that biological and ecological networks are coupled with each other and that diverse critical infrastructures interact with each other, triggering a new research hotspot of “networks of networks” (NON), where a network is formed by interdependent or interconnected networks. The resilience of complex networks is deeply influenced by its interdependence with other networks, which can be analyzed and predicted by percolation theory. This review paper shows that the analytic framework for NON yields novel percolation laws for n interdependent networks and also shows that the percolation theory of a single network studied extensively in physics and mathematics in the last 60 years is a specific limited case of the more general case of n interacting networks. Due to spatial constraints inherent in critical infrastructures, including the power gird, we also review the progress on the study of spatially-embedded interdependent networks, exhibiting extreme vulnerabilities compared to their non-embedded counterparts, especially in the case of localized attack. For the network dynamics, we illustrate the percolation framework and methods using an example of a real transportation system, where the analysis based on network dynamics is significantly different from the structural static analysis. For the failure mechanism, we here review recent progress on the spontaneous recovery after network collapse. These findings can help us to understand, realize and hopefully mitigate the increasing risk in the resilience of complex networks.


Recent Progress on the Resilience of Complex Networks
Jianxi Gao, Xueming Liu, Daqing Li, and Shlomo Havlin
Energies 2015, 8(10), 12187-12210; http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/en81012187 


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
Scoop.it!

Measuring Emotional Contagion in Social Media

Social media are used as main discussion channels by millions of individuals every day. The content individuals produce in daily social-media-based micro-communications, and the emotions therein expressed, may impact the emotional states of others. A recent experiment performed on Facebook hypothesized that emotions spread online, even in absence of non-verbal cues typical of in-person interactions, and that individuals are more likely to adopt positive or negative emotions if these are over-expressed in their social network. Experiments of this type, however, raise ethical concerns, as they require massive-scale content manipulation with unknown consequences for the individuals therein involved. Here, we study the dynamics of emotional contagion using a random sample of Twitter users, whose activity (and the stimuli they were exposed to) was observed during a week of September 2014. Rather than manipulating content, we devise a null model that discounts some confounding factors (including the effect of emotional contagion). We measure the emotional valence of content the users are exposed to before posting their own tweets. We determine that on average a negative post follows an over-exposure to 4.34% more negative content than baseline, while positive posts occur after an average over-exposure to 4.50% more positive contents. We highlight the presence of a linear relationship between the average emotional valence of the stimuli users are exposed to, and that of the responses they produce. We also identify two different classes of individuals: highly and scarcely susceptible to emotional contagion. Highly susceptible users are significantly less inclined to adopt negative emotions than the scarcely susceptible ones, but equally likely to adopt positive emotions. In general, the likelihood of adopting positive emotions is much greater than that of negative emotions.


Ferrara E, Yang Z (2015) Measuring Emotional Contagion in Social Media. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0142390. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0142390 ;


Via Complexity Digest
more...
António F Fonseca's curator insight, November 8, 2015 6:42 AM

Nice to know that positive emotions are more contagious than negative ones. 

Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Five Guidelines for Successful Funder Collaborations (SSIR)

Five Guidelines for Successful Funder Collaborations (SSIR) | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Lessons from the Packard Foundation on how funders can effectively work together to amplify their resources and impact.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Unlike Us | Beyond distributed and decentralized: what is a federated network?

Unlike Us | Beyond distributed and decentralized: what is a federated network? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Christopher Alexander on living structure | Solving for Pattern

Christopher Alexander on living structure | Solving for Pattern | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Video of the famous 1996 OOPSLA talk on the origins of pattern theory and the generation of a living world.
june holley's insight:

WOW! A video of a Christopher Alexander (Pattern Language) talk!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

How can social network analysis help tackle West Africa’s challenges?

How can social network analysis help tackle West Africa’s challenges? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
by Matthew Stephenson, Sahel and West Africa Club Secretariat (SWAC/OECD) Social network analysis (SNA) is a powerful tool that helps understand interactions amongst individuals, groups or institut...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
Scoop.it!

A Design Pattern for Decentralised Decision Making

The engineering of large-scale decentralised systems requires sound methodologies to guarantee the attainment of the desired macroscopic system-level behaviour given the microscopic individual-level implementation. While a general-purpose methodology is currently out of reach, specific solutions can be given to broad classes of problems by means of well-conceived design patterns. We propose a design pattern for collective decision making grounded on experimental/theoretical studies of the nest-site selection behaviour observed in honeybee swarms (Apis mellifera). The way in which honeybee swarms arrive at consensus is fairly well-understood at the macroscopic level. We provide formal guidelines for the microscopic implementation of collective decisions to quantitatively match the macroscopic predictions. We discuss implementation strategies based on both homogeneous and heterogeneous multiagent systems, and we provide means to deal with spatial and topological factors that have a bearing on the micro-macro link. Finally, we exploit the design pattern in two case studies that showcase the viability of the approach. Besides engineering, such a design pattern can prove useful for a deeper understanding of decision making in natural systems thanks to the inclusion of individual heterogeneities and spatial factors, which are often disregarded in theoretical modelling.


Reina A, Valentini G, Fernández-Oto C, Dorigo M, Trianni V (2015) A Design Pattern for Decentralised Decision Making. PLoS ONE 10(10): e0140950. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0140950


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.