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networks and network weaving
How networks can transform our world
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The brain, the Internet and the future of work

The brain, the Internet and the future of work | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
It is not uncommon to think that knowing is something that goes on in the brain. Perhaps astonishingly, the evidence that it is really so is not quite clear. Some scientists have recently expressed...
june holley's insight:

"Changing the way we communicate is the way we change organizations. Changing the conversation is not a major program or change process. It is about understanding and influencing participation. It is sometimes about new connections, new conversations, and new people taking actively part. It is often about asking different kind of questions and pointing to different kinds of issues."

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Five Trends Shaping the Future of Work

Five Trends Shaping the Future of Work | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

If there’s one thing that we can all agree on it’s that the world of work is changing…quickly. The way we have been working over the past few years is NOT how are we are going to be working in the coming years. Perhaps one of the most important underlying factors driving this change is the coming shift around who drives how work gets done. Traditionally executives would set the rules and pass those down to managers who in turn would pass those down to employees. But as Dan Pink aptly put it, “talented people need organizations less than organizations need talented people.” In other words employees are now starting to drive the decisions and conversations around how work gets done, when it gets done, who it gets done with, what technologies are being used to get it done, etc. The next few years are going to bring about dramatic changes. But why now? What are the key trends that are driving this new future of work? There are five of them - take a look.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Ian Berry's curator insight, September 10, 2:39 PM

I agree with the trends One is missing for me The rehumanisation of the workplace. The future is not about technology rather why and how we use it to bring humanity back to the workplace or in some cases put humanity into the workplace

Michael Thiel's curator insight, September 11, 3:53 AM

In den nächsten Jahren wird sich die Arbeitswelt immer mehr verändern aufgrund der mobilen, globalisierten Welt und des daraus resultierenden erhöhten Bedarfs an kollaborativen Verhaltensweisen. Diese Veränderungen rufen nach Führungskompetenzen, die vernetztes, kooperatives Denken in den Vordergrund stellen und Führung als komplexen Prozess betrachten. 



Momentum Factor's curator insight, September 11, 8:07 AM

Go with the flow or fight your way upstream?  Here are 5 undercurrents that will push business in the next few years. 

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Multidimensional homophily in friendship networks

Homophily—the tendency for individuals to associate with similar others—is one of the most persistent findings in social network analysis. Its importance is established along the lines of a multitude of sociologically relevant dimensions, e.g. sex, ethnicity and social class. Existing research, however, mostly focuses on one dimension at a time. But people are inherently multidimensional, have many attributes and are members of multiple groups. In this article, we explore such multidimensionality further in the context of network dynamics. Are friendship ties increasingly likely to emerge and persist when individuals have an increasing number of attributes in common? We analyze eleven friendship networks of adolescents, draw on stochastic actor-oriented network models and focus on the interaction of established homophily effects. Our results indicate that main effects for homophily on various dimensions are positive. At the same time, the interaction of these homophily effects is negative. There seems to be a diminishing effect for having more than one attribute in common. We conclude that studies of homophily and friendship formation need to address such multidimensionality further.


Multidimensional homophily in friendship networks  *
PER BLOCK and THOMAS GRUND

Network Science / Volume 2 / Issue 02 / August 2014, pp 189-212
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/nws.2014.17


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Complex network theory and the brain

Complex network theory and the brain | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

We have known for at least 100 years that a brain is organized as a network of connections between nerve cells. But in the last 10 years there has been a rapid growth in our capacity to quantify the complex topological pattern of brain connectivity, using mathematical tools drawn from graph theory.
Here we bring together articles and reviews from some of the world’s leading experts in contemporary brain network analysis by graph theory. The contributions are focused on three big questions that seem important at this stage in the scientific evolution of the field: How does the topology of a brain network relate to its physical embedding in anatomical space and its biological costs? How does brain network topology constrain brain dynamics and function? And what seem likely to be important future methodological developments in the application of graph theory to analysis of brain networks?
Clearer understanding of the principles of brain network organization is fundamental to understanding many aspects of cognitive function, brain development and clinical brain disorders. We hope this issue provides a forward-looking window on this fast moving field and captures some of the excitement of recent progress in applying the concepts of graph theory to measuring and modeling the complexity of brain networks.


Complex network theory and the brain
Issue compiled and edited by David Papo, Javier M. Buldú, Stefano Boccaletti and Edward T. Bullmore

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/site/2014/network.xhtml


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Systems Thinking and the Future of Cities

Systems Thinking and the Future of Cities | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The idea that nothing exists in isolation−but only as part of a system−has long been embedded in folklore, religious scriptures, and common sense.
june holley's insight:

"The idea that nothing exists in isolation−but only as part of a system−has long been embedded in folklore, religious scriptures, and common sense. Yet, systems dynamics as a science has yet to transform the way we conduct the public business. This article first briefly explores the question of why advances in systems theory have failed to transform public policy. The second part describes the ways in which our understanding of systems is growing−not so much from theorizing, but from practical applications in agriculture, building design, and medical science. The third part focuses on whether and how that knowledge and systems science can be deployed to improve urban governance in the face of rapid climate destabilization so that sustainability becomes the norm, not the occasional success story."

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Watch now: NOVA | The Pattern in Nature's Networks | PBS Video

Science shows it’s a small world after all—and nature’s networks follow a similar pattern.
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What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Inspired by biological design and self-organizing systems, artist Heather Barnett co-creates with physarum polycephalum, a eukaryotic microorganism that lives in cool, moist areas. What can people learn from the semi-intelligent slime mold? Watch this talk to find out.


http://on.ted.com/sz7m


Via Complexity Digest
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Is Collaboration Limited by Organizational Structure?

Is Collaboration Limited by Organizational Structure? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
We've been seeking enterprise 2.0 and social business for several years now with some notable success, but still quite a lot of “vague” and some level of fatigue. Topic: Social Business.
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Networks as Responsible Structures

Networks as Responsible Structures | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
There is growing awareness that current organizational structures can breed irresponsibility.  That is, arrangements are created where people are less able to be responsive in helpful ways.
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Using sociometers to quantify social interaction patterns

Using sociometers to quantify social interaction patterns | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Research on human social interactions has traditionally relied on self-reports. Despite their widespread use, self-reported accounts of behaviour are prone to biases and necessarily reduce the range of behaviours, and the number of subjects, that may be studied simultaneously. The development of ever smaller sensors makes it possible to study group-level human behaviour in naturalistic settings outside research laboratories. We used such sensors, sociometers, to examine gender, talkativeness and interaction style in two different contexts. Here, we find that in the collaborative context, women were much more likely to be physically proximate to other women and were also significantly more talkative than men, especially in small groups. In contrast, there were no gender-based differences in the non-collaborative setting. Our results highlight the importance of objective measurement in the study of human behaviour, here enabling us to discern context specific, gender-based differences in interaction style.

Via Ashish Umre
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Complexity: A Very Short Introduction (by John H. Holland)

The importance of complexity is well-captured by Hawking's comment: "Complexity is the science of the 21st century". From the movement of flocks of birds to the Internet, environmental sustainability, and market regulation, the study and understanding of complex non-linear systems has become highly influential over the last 30 years.

In this Very Short Introduction, one of the leading figures in the field, John Holland, introduces the key elements and conceptual framework of complexity. From complex physical systems such as fluid flow and the difficulties of predicting weather, to complex adaptive systems such as the highly diverse and interdependent ecosystems of rainforests, he combines simple, well-known examples -- Adam Smith's pin factory, Darwin's comet orchid, and Simon's 'watchmaker' -- with an account of
the approaches, involving agents and urn models, taken by complexity theory.

 

 


Via Complexity Digest, Liz Rykert
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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 16, 12:34 AM

Very good overrview

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Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity

Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
june holley's insight:

Wonderful stuff in here!

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Crowdsourcing for Participatory Democracies: Efficient Elicitation of Social Choice Functions

We present theoretical and empirical results demonstrating the usefulness of voting rules for participatory democracies. We first give algorithms which efficiently elicit \epsilon-approximations to two prominent voting rules: the Borda rule and the Condorcet winner. This result circumvents previous prohibitive lower bounds and is surprisingly strong: even if the number of ideas is as large as the number of participants, each participant will only have to make a logarithmic number of comparisons, an exponential improvement over the linear number of comparisons previously needed. We demonstrate the approach in an experiment in Finland's recent off-road traffic law reform, observing that the total number of comparisons needed to achieve a fixed \epsilon approximation is linear in the number of ideas and that the constant is not large.
Finally, we note a few other experimental observations which support the use of voting rules for aggregation. First, we observe that rating, one of the common alternatives to ranking, manifested effects of bias in our data. Second, we show that very few of the topics lacked a Condorcet winner, one of the prominent negative results in voting. Finally, we show data hinting at a potential future direction: the use of partial rankings as opposed to pairwise comparisons to further decrease the elicitation time.


Via Bernard Ryefield
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BYOT Network Digital age Learning ecosystem

BYOT Network Digital age Learning ecosystem | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Transforming schools and classrooms into learning communities with personalized technology tools and digital content

Via juandoming
june holley's insight:

Not just for schools but for all network learners!

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 10, 7:38 AM
John Dewey's suggestions about the teacher being and becoming responsible for the environment learning occurs within came to mind. That invitation is processes emerging from what Whitehead described as the genius of the teacher. @ivon_ehd1
En Français - Alix Creuzé's curator insight, September 10, 8:17 AM

L'écosystéme de l'apprentissage.

Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, September 10, 1:28 PM

A key component for this type of classroom is for the teacher to have a growth mindset and a desire to collaborate and share with students and other teachers. 

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What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

VUCA, short for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, and a catchall for “Hey, it’s crazy out there!”    It’s also misleading: VUCA conflates four distinct types of challenges that demand four distinct types of responses. That makes it difficult to know how to approach a challenging situation and easy to use VUCA as a crutch, a way to throw off the hard work of strategy and planning—after all, you can’t prepare for a VUCA world, right?
 

Actually, you can. Here is a guide to identifying, getting ready for, and responding to events in each of the four VUCA categories.

Authors:  Nathan Bennett and G. James Lemoine

Related posts by Deb:

      

   


 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 1, 7:52 AM

VUCA is a term from the military, put into popular use by futurist Bob Johansen in 2010, as mentioned in his book, now in a its second edition,  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World.  The quadrant model depicted, by authors  is handy for thinking through what you can learn and do to be fully prepared and agile enough for this VUCA world.  ~  Deb

Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 5:31 AM

The world of work is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As a result it is time to view surprises as the new normal and steady state as the exception. The difference over the past decade is the increasing speed at which leaders need to address multiple challenges, often at the same time.

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Conditions for the Emergence of Shared Norms in Populations with Incompatible Preferences

Understanding norms is a key challenge in sociology. Nevertheless, there is a lack of dynamical models explaining how one of several possible behaviors is established as a norm and under what conditions. Analysing an agent-based model, we identify interesting parameter dependencies that imply when two behaviors will coexist or when a shared norm will emerge in a heterogeneous society, where different populations have incompatible preferences. Our model highlights the importance of randomness, spatial interactions, non-linear dynamics, and self-organization. It can also explain the emergence of unpopular norms that do not maximize the collective benefit. Furthermore, we compare behavior-based with preference-based punishment and find interesting results concerning hypocritical punishment. Strikingly, pressuring others to perform the same public behavior as oneself is more effective in promoting norms than pressuring others to meet one’s own private preference. Finally, we show that adaptive group pressure exerted by randomly occuring, local majorities may create norms under conditions where different behaviors would normally coexist.


Helbing D, Yu W, Opp K-D, Rauhut H (2014) Conditions for the Emergence of Shared Norms in Populations with Incompatible Preferences. PLoS ONE 9(8): e104207. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0104207


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Open Source Recipes to Make Social Innovations More Shareable

Open Source Recipes to Make Social Innovations More Shareable | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Inspired by the principles of open source software, the concept of Open Social Innovation aims to document social innovations so they can
june holley's insight:

This is REALLY important - how do we share successes in a way that people can actually replicate (or adapt)? How can things go viral without this?

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Epidemic processes in complex networks

In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and socio-technical systems. The complex properties of real world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. Here we present a coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, epidemiologists, computer and social scientists share a common interest in studying epidemic spreading and rely on very similar models for the description of the diffusion of pathogens, knowledge, and innovation. For this reason, while we focus on the main results and the paradigmatic models in infectious disease modeling, we also present the major results concerning generalized social contagion processes. Finally we outline the research activity at the forefront in the study of epidemic spreading in co-evolving and time-varying networks.


Epidemic processes in complex networks
Romualdo Pastor-Satorras, Claudio Castellano, Piet Van Mieghem, Alessandro Vespignani

http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2701


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Seeing Like a Network — The Message — Medium

Seeing Like a Network — The Message — Medium | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Don’t Call It Threat Modeling
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Interview: Prof Geoffrey West on complexity science

CLC interviewed Prof. Geoffrey West, Distinguished Professor and Past President of Sante Fe Institute, at the World Cities Summit 2014 on the study of cities in relation to complexity science....

Via Roger D. Jones, PhD, Complexity Digest
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Network Literacy Mini-Course | Howard Rheingold

Network Literacy Mini-Course | Howard Rheingold | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
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Detecting Communities Based on Network Topology

Detecting Communities Based on Network Topology | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Network methods have had profound influence in many domains and disciplines in the past decade. Community structure is a very important property of complex networks, but the accurate definition of a community remains an open problem. Here we defined community based on three properties, and then propose a simple and novel framework to detect communities based on network topology. We analyzed 16 different types of networks, and compared our partitions with Infomap, LPA, Fastgreedy and Walktrap, which are popular algorithms for community detection. Most of the partitions generated using our approach compare favorably to those generated by these other algorithms. Furthermore, we define overlapping nodes that combine community structure with shortest paths. We also analyzed the E. Coli. transcriptional regulatory network in detail, and identified modules with strong functional coherence.

  


Via Ashish Umre
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 26, 3:54 PM

Community is a more complex and organic organizing than teams. Teams are inherently hierarchical with predetermined goals. Communities are fluid and the goals are continuously being negotiated. Schools and classrooms are better served to be thought of as communities with overlapping qualities and permeable boundaries with other communities.

Eli Levine's curator insight, July 29, 3:42 PM

A useful tool for policy making, because it helps identify communities and how they interact to form super-communities.

 

The essence of mapping the polity and the public, socially, economically, technologically, and infrastrucutrally.

 

Think about it.

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Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks

Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

A number of social-ecological systems exhibit complex behavior associated with nonlinearities, bifurcations, and interaction with stochastic drivers. These systems are often prone to abrupt and unexpected instabilities and state shifts that emerge as a discontinuous response to gradual changes in environmental drivers. Predicting such behaviors is crucial to the prevention of or preparation for unwanted regime shifts. Recent research in ecology has investigated early warning signs that anticipate the divergence of univariate ecosystem dynamics from a stable attractor. To date, leading indicators of instability in systems with multiple interacting components have remained poorly investigated. This is a major limitation in the understanding of the dynamics of complex social-ecological networks. Here, we develop a theoretical framework to demonstrate that rising variance—measured, for example, by the maximum element of the covariance matrix of the network—is an effective leading indicator of network instability. We show that its reliability and robustness depend more on the sign of the interactions within the network than the network structure or noise intensity. Mutualistic, scale free and small world networks are less stable than their antagonistic or random counterparts but their instability is more reliably predicted by this leading indicator. These results provide new advances in multidimensional early warning analysis and offer a framework to evaluate the resilience of social-ecological networks.


Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks.

PLoS ONE 9(7): e101851. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101851 (2014)

Suweis Samir, D'Odorico Paolo


Code of the analysis available at https://github.com/suweis


http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0101851


Via Complexity Digest, Liz Rykert
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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 31, 12:24 AM

Reliably unreliable systems interacting

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Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University

Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Vanderbilt University
june holley's insight:

Group metacognition is one of the greatest sources of breakthroughs.

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The End of ‘Genius’

The End of ‘Genius’ | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The idea of the solitary creator is a myth that has outlived its usefulness.
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