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Social Ecology: Evolution or Revolution? Part 2. | Communities and ...

Social Ecology: Evolution or Revolution? Part 2. | Communities and ... | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
This is second post on the topic of emergent social ecology, which embraces social media, social networks, communities of practice, enterprise collaboration technologies, social business, social learning, collaboration, cooperation and sharing.

Via steve batchelder
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networks and network weaving
How networks can transform our world
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Rescooped by june holley from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Design Thinking, Deconstructed

Design Thinking, Deconstructed | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn




Via Gust MEES
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Important for networks and self-organiizing.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 21, 10:57 AM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 25, 3:38 PM

I wonder if this is what Derrida had in mind when he used the word deconstructed?

 

@ivon_ehd1

Teresita Moreno's curator insight, February 26, 11:49 AM
Read please
Rescooped by june holley from NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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Why Do We Share? Researchers Probe Motivation in P2P Systems

Why Do We Share? Researchers Probe Motivation in P2P Systems | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
In a just published study, researchers investigated the motivations driving users to peer-to-peer services like timebanks. (10,000 People Blog)

Via jean lievens, Nevermore Sithole
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Rescooped by june holley from Papers
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Systematic inequality and hierarchy in faculty hiring networks

The faculty job market plays a fundamental role in shaping research priorities, educational outcomes, and career trajectories among scientists and institutions. However, a quantitative understanding of faculty hiring as a system is lacking. Using a simple technique to extract the institutional prestige ranking that best explains an observed faculty hiring network—who hires whose graduates as faculty—we present and analyze comprehensive placement data on nearly 19,000 regular faculty in three disparate disciplines. Across disciplines, we find that faculty hiring follows a common and steeply hierarchical structure that reflects profound social inequality. Furthermore, doctoral prestige alone better predicts ultimate placement than a U.S. News & World Report rank, women generally place worse than men, and increased institutional prestige leads to increased faculty production, better faculty placement, and a more influential position within the discipline. These results advance our ability to quantify the influence of prestige in academia and shed new light on the academic system.


Systematic inequality and hierarchy in faculty hiring networks
Aaron Clauset, Samuel Arbesman, Daniel B. Larremore

Science Advances 01 Feb 2015: Vol. 1 no. 1 e1400005

http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1400005 


Via Complexity Digest
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Networks Reveal the Connections of Disease

Networks Reveal the Connections of Disease | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Enormous databases of medical records have begun to reveal the hidden biological missteps that make us sick.


https://www.quantamagazine.org/20150129-networks-reveal-the-connections-of-disease/


Via Complexity Digest
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Rescooped by june holley from NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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Networking democracy? Social media innovations in participatory politics” - City Research Online

Networking democracy? Social media innovations in participatory politics” - City Research Online | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Early conceptions of digital democracy as a virtual public sphere or civic commons have been replaced by a new technological optimism for democratic renewal based upon the open and collaborative networking characteristics of social media. This article provides an introduction to a special issue of the international journal Information, Communication & Society which attempts to present a grounded analysis on these claims drawing upon evidence-based research and analysis. A more cautious approach is suggested for the potential of social media to facilitate more participative democracy whilst acknowledging its disruptive value for challenging traditional interests and modes of communicative power.

Via jean lievens, Nevermore Sithole
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Reflections from talking to people who love networks | Ari Sahagún

Reflections from talking to people who love networks | Ari Sahagún | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
june holley's insight:

Some good resources.

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Rescooped by june holley from Culture Change
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Brenda Zimmerman - Preventing Snap Back - YouTube

At the Collective Impact Summit held Oct 6-10 in Toronto, keynote speaker Brenda Zimmerman discussed 'Preventing Snap Back.' Brenda Zimmerman is the unpreced...

Via Liz Rykert
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Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 5, 10:35 AM

What is Snap Back? you might ask...

Snap back is the thing that happens when you have made a change effort and you find yourself returning to where you started rather than sustaining the change. This talk - given at the Collective Impact Summit in November 2014 is a helpful resource to gain insight on adaptive resilience and to understand how relational patterns of interaction are fractal in nature, meaning they can repeat at different levels. If you are working on large systems change this resource will be particularly useful. 15 mins.

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▶ Pat Ebright - Complex Adaptive System Theory - YouTube

Gonzaga Mentor Gallery Clip - 2007. Pat Ebright Complex Adaptive System Theory . Copyright Gonzaga University 2007. Video by JesuitNET.
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Rescooped by june holley from Talks
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Geoff Mulgan: The wicked problems remain wicked: has the craft and science of transforming whole systems moved forward, and how could we do better?

16o. Congreso Wosc 2014. Geoff Mulgan. Universidad de Ibagué. Ibagué, octubre 15 de 2014

Via Complexity Digest
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Rescooped by june holley from LeadershipABC
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Organizing for the Unpredictable

Organizing for the Unpredictable - NOBL Collective - Medium

Barraged by lists of predictions, trends, and otherwise guesses. Swaddled in our own strategic plans. Yet, 2015 won’t conform neatly to our organizational goals and expectations — to succeed, we must learn to adapt ourselves and our organizations to the unforeseen events that will undoubtedly shape the year ahead.




Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, February 1, 11:39 PM

We live now in a world that is far more connected, frenetic, and unpredictable than ever before...

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 2, 9:52 AM

“The important thing is to be able at any moment to sacrifice
what we are for what we could become”
— Charles Du Bos


"The survival of the fittest is the ageless law of nature, but the fittest are rarely the strong. The fittest are those endowed with the qualifications for adaptation, the ability to accept the inevitable and conform to the unavoidable, to harmonize with existing or changing conditions."
– Dave E. Smalley

Jan Matulewicz's curator insight, February 5, 3:58 AM

If the truly unthinkable is about to materialize anyway, since the certainty of our human ways in the near future is vanishing, one of the prudent strategies is engineering miracles both in personal life and business.  I find strange synergy in what is a joke today http://jahumatulewicz.blogspot.com/2015/02/engineering-miracles.html and what will be sensible tomorrow.

 

 

Rescooped by june holley from Peer2Politics
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A New Alignment of Movements? | David Bollier

A New Alignment of Movements? | David Bollier | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

In September 2014, the Commons Strategies Group convened a three-day workshop in Meissen, Germany, of 25 policy advocates and activists from a variety of different economic and social movements.  The topic of the "deep dive":  Can leading alt-economic and social movements find ways to work more closely together?  Can there be a greater convergence and collaboration in fighting the pathologies of neoliberalism? 



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Rescooped by june holley from Research Capacity-Building in Africa
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How digital inclusion can support wider policy outcomes | Digital inclusion

How digital inclusion can support wider policy outcomes | Digital inclusion | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Digital inclusion is about having the right access, skills, motivation and trust to confidently go online.

Via Nevermore Sithole
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How to start thinking and doing more about digital inclusion - part of a longer series. 

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Re-Wiring Networks:                                                                                     The Urgency of Building Momentum in our Movement NOW!

Re-Wiring Networks:                                                                                     The Urgency of Building Momentum in our Movement NOW! | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
By Allen Kwabena Frimpong 
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Rescooped by june holley from Papers
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Human Metasystem Transition (HMST) Theory

Metasystem transitions are events representing the evolutionary emergence of a higher level of organization through the integration of subsystems into a higher “metasystem” (A1+A2+A3=B). Such events have occurred several times throughout the history of life (e.g., emergence of life, multicellular life, sexual reproduction). The emergence of new levels of organization has occurred within the human system three times, and has resulted in three broadly defined levels of higher control, producing three broadly defined levels of group selection (e.g., band/tribe, chiefdom/kingdom, nation-state/international). These are “Human Metasystem Transitions” (HMST). Throughout these HMST several common system-level patterns have manifested that are fundamental to understanding the nature and evolution of the human system, as well as our potential future development. First, HMST have been built around the control of three mostly distinct primary energy sources (e.g., hunting, agriculture, industry). Second, the control of new energy sources has always been achieved and stabilized by utilizing the evolutionary emergence of a more powerful information-processing medium (e.g., language, writing, printing press). Third, new controls emerge with the capability of organizing energy flows over larger expanses of space in shorter durations of time: bands/tribes controlled regional space and stabilized for hundreds of thousand of years, chiefdoms/kingdoms controlled semi-continental expanses of space and stabilized for thousands of years, and nation-states control continental expanses of space and have stabilized for centuries. This space-time component of hierarchical metasystem emergence can be conceptualized as the active compression of space-time-energy-matter (STEM compression) enabled by higher informational and energetic properties within the human system, which allow for more complex organization (i.e., higher subsystem integration). In this framework, increased information-energy control and feedback, and the consequent metasystem compression of space-time, represent the theoretical pillars of HMST theory. Most importantly, HMST theory may have practical application in modeling the future of the human system and the nature of the next human metasystem.


Human Metasystem Transition (HMST) Theory
Cadell Last

Journal of Evolution and Technology - Vol. 25 Issue 1 – January 2015 - pgs 1-16


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Rescooped by june holley from Collaborationweb
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Business Value Group International – It’s all about the Grey – A path to Collaboration, Innovation and Teamwork

Business Value Group International – It’s all about the Grey – A path to Collaboration, Innovation and Teamwork | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

I find that real collaboration is often as elusive as the woolly mammoth was just before they went extinct. Thousands of books and articles have been written and will continue to be written about such topics as collaboration, teams, and innovation. (I include innovation in this list as no meaningful innovation can occur without people working with each other in highly creative and productive modes). Many use exhaustive data research and analysis of industries/companies past performance in a quest to improve credibility, however in my humble opinion, little if any of the messages stick or cause behavior changes. Many of the concepts simply become brain candy for a leaders psyche. The lessons and language are mostly consigned to the sub-conscious repository of buzz words that are used to feed meaningless rhetoric and pretend/inauthentic dialogue that rarely yields results in a timely enough manner in this competitive and fast paced world.


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David Hain's curator insight, February 11, 7:16 AM

4 key questions that collaboration will test. "An unexamined life is not worth living" ~ Socrates

Rescooped by june holley from Building Innovation Capital
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The Capabilities Your Organization Needs to Sustain Innovation

The Capabilities Your Organization Needs to Sustain Innovation | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Three Capabilities of Innovation
After studying masters of organizational innovation for over 10 years, we’ve identified three key activities that truly innovative organizations like Pixar are able to do well. First, the people and groups in them do collaborative problem solving, which we call creative abrasion. Second, they try things and learn by discovery, demonstrating creative agility. Third, they create new and better solutions because they integrate existing ideas in unanticipated ways, practicing creative resolution.
3 capabilities: Creative abrasion + Creative agility + Creative resolution

 


Via Alexander Crépin, Paul Hobcraft
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Monica Gabay's curator insight, February 6, 1:48 PM

Innovation fuels resilience

Rani Suman's curator insight, February 7, 5:02 AM

Nice!

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▶ Complex systems design:Networks - YouTube

Networks are the true structure to complex engineered systems and in this section we discuss the importance of seeing these systems from the perspective of a...
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Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems - Kindle edition by John H. Holland. Professional & Technical Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

Signals and Boundaries: Building Blocks for Complex Adaptive Systems - Kindle edition by John H. Holland. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.
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Rescooped by june holley from Talks
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▶ Carlos Gershenson: Requisite Variety, Autopoiesis, and Self-organization

16o. Congreso WOSC 2014. Carlos Gershenson. Universidad de Ibagué, octubre 16 de 2014

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Sibout Nooteboom's curator insight, January 28, 12:23 PM

Nice intro to complexity theory, with its potentially huge implications on how to govern and lead.

Rescooped by june holley from Influence et contagion
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Structural #Patterns of the Occupy Movement on Facebook | #socialchange #SNA

Structural #Patterns of the Occupy Movement on Facebook | #socialchange #SNA | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

In this work we study a peculiar example of social organization on Facebook: the Occupy Movement -- i.e., an international protest movement against social and economic inequality organized online at a city level. We consider 179 US Facebook public pages during the time period between September 2011 and February 2013. The dataset includes 618K active users and 753K posts that received about 5.2M likes and 1.1M comments. By labeling user according to their interaction patterns on pages -- e.g., a user is considered to be polarized if she has at least the 95% of her likes on a specific page -- we find that activities are not locally coordinated by geographically close pages, but are driven by pages linked to major US cities that act as hubs within the various groups. Such a pattern is verified even by extracting the backbone structure -- i.e., filtering statistically relevant weight heterogeneities -- for both the pages-reshares and the pages-common users networks.

 

Structural Patterns of the Occupy Movement on Facebook
Michela Del Vicario, Qian Zhang, Alessandro Bessi, Fabiana Zollo, Antonio Scala, Guido Caldarelli, Walter Quattrociocchi

http://arxiv.org/abs/1501.07203


Via Complexity Digest, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, January 30, 3:51 AM
Data Description The dataset represents a complete screenshot of the Occupy Movement in the period immediately following the outbreak of the protest on September 17th, 2011 in the Zuccotti Park of New York. The dataset covers all the posts until the end of February 2013, at the time when all the major protests were no more active. After the Zuccotti occupation, in fact, an October full of similar occupational events followed, leading to an international protest movement that extended itself until the end of 2012, when the movement was principally an online collective protest.