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Weaving the Network | ACEE

Weaving the Network | ACEE | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
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networks and network weaving
How networks can transform our world
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Digital transformation requires better organisational structures

Digital transformation requires better organisational structures | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The following is an outline of the keynote I gave today at the 7th Social Business Forum in Milan, with slides embedded at the bottom of the post: When considering the ‘why’ of social business, it is worth starting at an even more fundamental level: why do large firms exist? Ronald Coase said it was …
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The Cold Dark Path

The Cold Dark Path | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Two Competing Loops


This week at the first meeting of the League of Social Intrapreneurs in Melbourne I was introduced to the Berkana Institute two loops theory of change. The model of change in complex systems resonated immediately.


When a system nears its peak, change agents identify the need for alternatives and drop out.  They connect and begin to explore alternatives nourishing a new system through experimentation. Eventually the stories of their success illuminates the change to those who remain in the old declining system.


A four step model with four simple verbs seems clear and straightforward. Why is it that the path of change is such a cold dark path?


Nobody Warns You about the Dip


Stepping out of a warm and comfortable ongoing system with its present day rewards is a daunting uncertain choice however bleak the future of that system may look. Those with most to gain will oppose the agents of change who name the issues and start to work on alternatives. Opposition will not always be fair or balanced.




Sign you made it as a change agent: someone misapplies a political label, impugns your integrity or questions your sanity. #caww


— Simon Terry (@simongterry)

July 3, 2014






Most difficult of all is that dip in the diagram above. The uncertainty and the need to build a new complex future means the alternative system starts along way back and with a great deal more risk. Selling another path even to yourself can be a challenge in this scenario.


All the discussions about collaboration, requests for advice and stories shared among change agents at the League of Social Entrepreneurs, in Responsive Organisation, in Change Agents Worldwide or in other conversations that I have with unreasonable people belong at the bottom of the loop where people struggle nourishing new alternatives.


We must embrace the fact that the road to change is a road with dips and uncertainties. Proceeding any other way does not prepare people for the work ahead.


Nourishing Change Takes Hard Work


Most change fails after the connect stage.  Declaring a need for change is initially easy and exhilarating. Manifestos are thrilling. Connecting with other like minded people has a wonderful effect for the spirits and is a great way to reinforce the need for change.


Then nothing happens for a really long time. It grows cold and dark on the path of change.


Lots of drudgery dogs those walking the cold dark path of change. Meetings need to be organised and venues found. Compromises need to be negotiated between people who are 99% aligned. Factions and fragmentation occurs and saps the energy of everyone. More change agents need to be recruited, especially for the work. Experiments need to be agreed, funded and run. Failed experiments need to be cleaned up. New experiments agreed, funded and implemented. Success needs to be found. Someone needs to find money or work out the details of the new model. Communication materials don’t write themselves. Just when success seems inevitable the dying system finds a way to set you back.


Change falls apart when the connected agents of change won’t work the experiments long or hard enough to nourish the success of the new system. If they won’t invest the time to build new connections, share successes, to solve the daily issues and to innovate a path forward then the nourish stage will never offer an opportunity to others to join in the change.


If the organisers of the first meet up about a change end up with all the actions, then a change initiative has work to do to find others to nourish the change. Engaging others in the work matters more than engaging them in the idea of the change.


Join in the Work


Lots of people want to join change at the exhilarating beginning and again at the celebratory end. Traditional management focus only on the beginnings and the endings but leadership is found in realising the collective potential of the journey.


The question is who is willing to walk the cold dark road. Those change agents who do the leadership work of nourishing new experiments shape the future. That path is hard but the work is the most purposeful and rewarding. 

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Anne Landreat's curator insight, July 8, 4:11 PM

Ardu, le chemin de la transformation réelle, incarnée, du passage grandeur nature d'un système à un autre, l'est certainement.

Décourageant, déstabilisant, submergeant parfois aussi. Mais froid et sombre ? Non, pas si la transformation est effectivement accompagnée et nourrie, avec bienveillance et savoir-faire. Et que l'effet boule de neige, engagement d'un nombre toujours croissant de participants actifs dans le projet de changement est recherché et facilité sans relâche.

Alors, tout est possible.

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Frontiers in Ecology Evolution and Complexity

Frontiers in Ecology Evolution and Complexity | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Advances in molecular biology, remote sensing, systems biology, bioinformatics, non-linear science, the physics of complex systems and other fields have rendered a great amount of data that remain to be integrated into models and theories that are capable of accounting for the complexity of ecological systems and the evolutionary dynamics of life. It is thus necessary to provide a solid basis to discuss and reflect on these and other challenges both at the local and global scales. This volume aims to delineate an integrative and interdisciplinary view that suggests new avenues in research and teaching, critically discusses the scope of the diverse methods in the study of complex systems, and points at key open questions. Finally, this book will provide students and specialists with a collection of high quality open access essays that will contribute to integrate Ecology, Evolution and Complexity in the context of basic research and in the field of Sustainability Sciences

 

Frontiers in Ecology, Evolution and Complexity
Editors: Mariana Benítez, Octavio Miramontes and Alfonso Valiente-Banuet
Prologue by Stuart A. Kauffman
http://scifunam.fisica.unam.mx/mir/copit/TS0012EN/TS0012EN.html ;


Via Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
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The Strength of the Strongest Ties in Collaborative Problem Solving

The Strength of the Strongest Ties in Collaborative Problem Solving | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Complex problem solving in science, engineering, and business has become a highly collaborative endeavor. Teams of scientists or engineers collaborate on projects using their social networks to gather new ideas and feedback. Here we bridge the literature on team performance and information networks by studying teams' problem solving abilities as a function of both their within-team networks and their members' extended networks. We show that, while an assigned team's performance is strongly correlated with its networks of expressive and instrumental ties, only the strongest ties in both networks have an effect on performance. Both networks of strong ties explain more of the variance than other factors, such as measured or self-evaluated technical competencies, or the personalities of the team members. In fact, the inclusion of the network of strong ties renders these factors non-significant in the statistical analysis. Our results have consequences for the organization of teams of scientists, engineers, and other knowledge workers tackling today's most complex problems.

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Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership

Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Social technologies with their inherent democratic, anti-hierarchical quality easily transcend internal and external boundaries, suddenly creating a powerful thrust for horizontal collaboration and participation. They give each and every member of an organization a creative voice and enable real-time virtual connectivity in a way we have never seen before. This makes them a great catalyst for the organizational principles that are required by the new leadership context of the 21st century.


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Joe Boutte's curator insight, June 23, 4:54 AM

Everyday leadership integrates all modes of communications.  21st century leaders should leverage new social technologies to communicate strategy, ideas, news, and priorities.  Unleashing communications from the email treadmill to extend and enhance face-to-face and other traditional communications methods is a force multiplier for organizational leadership.

Donna Karlin's curator insight, June 24, 5:12 AM

In an increasingly global community this is critical. Collaboration across borders and in increasingly virtual work environments, a new playbook is in order.

Donna Karlin's curator insight, June 24, 5:19 AM

In an increasingly virtual work environment and global community this is critical

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▶ Dirk Helbing: How to Create a Better World - YouTube

It probably started with Linux, then came Wikipedia and Open Street Map. Crowd-sourced information systems are central for the Digital Society to thrive. So, what's next? I will introduce a number of concepts such as the Planetary Nervous System, Global Participatory Platform, Interactive Virtual Worlds, User-Controlled Information Filters and Reputation Systems, and the Digital Data Purse. I will also introduce ideas such as the Social Mirror, Intercultural Adapter, the Social Protector and Social Money as tools to create a better world. These can help us to avoid systemic instabilities, market failures, tragedies of the commons, and exploitation, and to create the framework for a Participatory Market Society, where everyone can be better off.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_Lphxknozc


Via Complexity Digest
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The Future of Organization

Aiming to eliminate the compromises in organizational life. Covering some interesting and provocative ideas, spanning human rights, complexity science, the d...

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Systems Thinking, Critical Realism and Philosophy: A Confluence of Ideas (by John Mingers)

Systems Thinking, Critical Realism and Philosophy: A Confluence of Ideas (Ontological Explorations)

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This book seeks to re-address the whole question of philosophy and systems thinking for the twenty first century and provide a new work that would be of value to both systems and philosophy. This is a highly opportune time when different fields – critical realism, philosophy of science and systems thinking – are all developing around the same set of concepts and yet not realizing it.

This book will be of interest to the academic systems community worldwide and due to it's interdisciplinary coverage, it will also be of relevance to a wide range of scholars in other disciplines, particularly philosophy but also operational research, information systems, and sociology.

 

 


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Systems Thinking and Complexity 101 « how to save the world

Systems Thinking and Complexity 101 « how to save the world | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
"Systems Thinking and Complexity 101 « how to save the world" ( http://t.co/xLTRlclyZJ )

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 15, 10:27 AM

Creativity exists in the messiness of complexity and on the edge of chaos. It does not exist in the mainstream where it is easily managed.

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The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Two great trends are evident in the evolution of life on Earth: towards increasing diversification and towards increasing integration. Diversification has spread living processes across the planet, progressively increasing the range of environments and free energy sources exploited by life. Integration has proceeded through a stepwise process in which living entities at one level are integrated into cooperative groups that become larger-scale entities at the next level, and so on, producing cooperative organizations of increasing scale (for example, cooperative groups of simple cells gave rise to the more complex eukaryote cells, groups of these gave rise to multi-cellular organisms, and cooperative groups of these organisms produced animal societies). The trend towards increasing integration has continued during human evolution with the progressive increase in the scale of human groups and societies. The trends towards increasing diversification and integration are both driven by selection. An understanding of the trajectory and causal drivers of the trends suggests that they are likely to culminate in the emergence of a global entity. This entity would emerge from the integration of the living processes, matter, energy and technology of the planet into a global cooperative organization. Such an integration of the results of previous diversifications would enable the global entity to exploit the widest possible range of resources across the varied circumstances of the planet. This paper demonstrates that it's case for directionality meets the tests and criticisms that have proven fatal to previous claims for directionality in evolution.

 

The direction of evolution: The rise of cooperative organization
John E. Stewart

Biosystems
Available online 1 June 2014

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosystems.2014.05.006


Via Complexity Digest, NESS
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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 15, 7:06 PM

Cooperation is the best way to improve, sustain, maintain, and repair.  Competition is what drives everyone and everything towards something different, be it competition for resources or competition against the elements around us.

 

I don't get what the point of competition amongst the species is for.  Part of cooperation, after all, is knowing what works, learning about what could work better or doesn't work, and then letting the negative or sub-optimal slip back beneath the waves of ignorance, such that the new ways can rise to prominence.

 

Change is the only constant in this universe of universes.

 

Yet cooperation, I think, yields the higher and stronger of the universal structures that are out there, even if it means that there are still losers and winners.  The only difference is the level of consent and consensus that's reached within the social, ecological, economical, and/or political landscape.  One way works towards what is best.  The other way simply yields what is best at competing, which is not the same as being the actual best solution to a given problem or condition.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 16, 6:51 AM

is this the end of stove pipes?

Ra's curator insight, June 22, 3:02 AM

Have I been reading too much science fiction?

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Ten Leadership Skills for the Future - Valuable Insight from Bob Johansen (The Institute for the Future)

Ten Leadership Skills for the Future - Valuable Insight from Bob Johansen (The Institute for the Future) | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Here’s one of the ongoing challenges. Just what is the job of a leader? We start with definition. I liked these portions of the definition from Merriam-Webster (as I googled “Leader – define”): • s...
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Complicated or complex - knowing the difference is important

Complicated or complex - knowing the difference is important | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Understanding the difference between complex and complicated systems is becoming important for many aspects of management and policy. With complicated problems or issues one can define the problem ...

Via NESS, Complexity Digest
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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 2, 11:12 AM

It's a slight, but significant difference in meaning.  Just remember, that complex refers to systems, while complicated seems to refer more to engineering tasks.

 

However, it can be argued that some aspects of complexity can be engineered, although never with the precision or exactness of traditional forms of engineering.

 

Fuzzy math.

 

Think about it.

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MIT Center for Collective Intelligence

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Get a chance to see versions of the COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE HANDBOOK AS THEY ARE WRITTEN AND REVISED.

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Mass collaboration: How we can transform the impact of public funding | IPPR

Mass collaboration: How we can transform the impact of public funding | IPPR | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
In this provocative and practical paper, social entrepreneurship leader Matthew Pike sets out a course of action for a wholesale change of culture, decision-making and accountability in the contracting of public services, to take advantage of a 'rare window of opportunity to transform how government works with others'.

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Social Networking Enabled Organisational Change

Social Networking Enabled Organisational Change | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Social networking enabled organisational change can improve staff engagement, enable innovation, increase agility & facilitate transformational change.

Via the Change Samurai, Anne Landreat
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Anne Landreat's curator insight, July 8, 11:59 PM

Oui. A condition que les réseaux existes et soient cultivés et encouragés IRL. Le "réseau social" n'est qu'un outil. Il n'a aucune utilité en lui-même. Tout dépend de l'usage qu'on en fait, de l'humain ou des humains qui s'en servent.

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Regardless of our city's size, we all live in ‘villages’

Regardless of our city's size, we all live in ‘villages’ | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
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Thanks Sandy maxey!

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Liz Rykert's curator insight, July 4, 6:31 AM

Thanks for this great scoop June! Would not expect les form SantaFe Institute and MIT - here is my favourite quote:


“People tend to think of cities as people, buildings, roads, pipes, and so on,” he says. “But at a more fundamental level, cities are really about connections. These connections form networks of people and organizations that enable the production of all products of civilization, from modern economies and fast innovation to complex bureaucracies and political institutions.”


“That social interactions per person increase with city size begins to explain how so many socioeconomic quantities, from GDP to violent crime, scale superlinearly,” he adds. “We had developed theory that predict the superlinear growth of social connections in the way we observe here, but this is the first time that we can observe this phenomenon directly and explore it in detail! It is tremendously exciting.”

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Multiple percolation transitions in a configuration model of a network of networks

Multiple percolation transitions in a configuration model of a network of networks | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Recently much attention has been paid to the study of the robustness of interdependent and multiplex networks and, in particular, the networks of networks. The robustness of interdependent networks can be evaluated by the size of a mutually connected component when a fraction of nodes have been removed from these networks. Here we characterize the emergence of the mutually connected component in a network of networks in which every node of a network (layer) alpha is connected with q_alpha its randomly chosen replicas in some other networks and is interdependent of these nodes with probability r. We find that when the superdegrees q_alpha of different layers in a network of networks are distributed heterogeneously, multiple percolation phase transition can occur. We show that, depending on the value of r, these transition are continuous or discontinuous.


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Summer School 2014 in Neuroergonomics and Sociogenesis - biourbanism.org

Summer School 2014 in Neuroergonomics and Sociogenesis - biourbanism.org | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
“WHAT IF, INSTEAD OF BREAKING THEM, THE DESIGN OF CITIES COULD NATURALLY FEED SOCIAL TIES? THERE MUST BE A WAY FOR URBAN PLANNERS TO MAKE CITIES MORE HUMAN-CENTRED AND HAPPY, BY FOCUSING ON THE EFFECTS THAT THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT HAS ON SOCIALITY.„ This ISB Summer School presents a challenging programme in “Neuroergonomics and Sociogenesis”, to be held in Artena, Italy, …
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Fascinating term: biourbanism, neuroergonomics, sociogenesis! I want to learn more..

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Who would you like to sit near at work?

Who would you like to sit near at work? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
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Complexity and the Art of Public Policy: Solving Society's Problems from the Bottom Up: David Colander, Roland Kupers: 9780691152097: Amazon.com: Books

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy: Solving Society's Problems from the Bottom Up

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Complexity and the Art of Public Policy: Solving Society's Problems from the Bottom Up [David Colander, Roland Kupers] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Complexity science--made possible by modern analytical and computational advances--is changing the way we think about social systems and social theory. Unfortunately
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▶ Towards a Self-Regulating Society

Towards a Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. 2014/05/20

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Anne Landreat's curator insight, June 17, 4:12 AM

Vers une société auto-régulée. En Anglais.

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Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Daron Acemoglu, James A. Robinson

Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy

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Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy [Daron Acemoglu, James A. Robinson] on Amazon.com. What forces lead to democracy's creation? Why does it sometimes consolidate only to collapse at other times? Written by two of the foremost authorities on this subject in the world


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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 15, 10:36 AM

I think that the general conclusions that these two reached are most excellent and accurate to how things work in the empirical world.

 

used linear economic equations and the principle of Occam's Razor to overly simplify and inaccurately demonstrate the roots of the phenomenon that they otherwise did a good job of describing.  Personally, I would have chosen to use case studies and surveys of case studies to get as fine an image as is possible of what is happening in as many cases as possibles, in order to generalize upon the basics characteristics, functions, and dynamics in basically democratic and non-democratic societies.

 

I would have also liked to have seen a little more about how culture influences political, social, and economic choices, because it seems to me, at the very least, that culture: collective and individual interpretations of consciousness and the world that is around us, is at the roots of how we see the world and make decisions with regards to the world over rational and optimal decisions.

 

Culture is, for example, one of the key reasons that the US will not likely adapt for an extended period of time a collective, authoritarian system of government that many East Asian societies adopt.  Even in "democratic" East Asian societies, there is much more deference to the top leadership and collective needs in business and in society than there is in the more egalitarian and individualistic United States.  This changes the ways we individually and collectively make decisions as a society, which is one of the chief questions at the root of political science and economics.

 

A most interesting book.

 

 

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Strategy In A Networked World

Strategy In A Networked World | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
They key source of advantage is no longer building efficiencies, but widening and deepening connections.
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Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | NECSI

The New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) is an independent educational and research institution dedicated to advancing the study of complex systems.
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Complex Networks V: Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on Complex Networks CompleNet 2014 (edited by Pierluigi Contucci et al.)

A network is a mathematical object consisting of a set of points that are connected to each other in some fashion by lines. It turns out this simple description corresponds to a bewildering array of systems in the real world, ranging from technological ones such as the Internet and World Wide Web, biological networks such as that of connections of the nervous systems, food webs, or  protein interactions, infrastructural systems such as networks of roads, airports or the power-grid, to patterns of social and professional relationships such as friendship, sex partners, network of Hollywood actors, co-authorship networks and many more.

Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the scientific community in the properties of these networks. The emergence of the internet in particular, coupled with the widespread availability of inexpensive computing resources has facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of networks in the real world, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. The study of networks is broadly interdisciplinary and central developments have occurred in many fields, including mathematics, physics, computer and information sciences, biology, and the social sciences.

This book brings together a collection of cutting-edge research in the field from a diverse array of researchers ranging from physicists to social scientists, and presents them in a coherent fashion, highlighting the strong interconnections between the different areas. Topics included are social networks and social media, opinion and innovation diffusion,  biological and health-related networks, language networks, as well as network theory, community detection,  or growth models for Complex Networks.

 

 


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