networks and netw...
Follow
3.7K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
onto networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

Complex Systems Science as a New Transdisciplinary Science, by Paul Bourgine

The new science of complex systems will be at the heart of the future of the Worldwide Knowledge Society. It is providing radical new ways of understanding the physical, biological, ecological, and techno-social universe. Complex Systems are open, value-laden, multi-level, multi-component, reconfigurable systems of systems, situated in turbulent, unstable, and changing environments. They evolve, adapt and transform through internal and external dynamic interactions. They are the source of very difficult scientific challenges for observing, understanding, reconstructing and predicting their multi-scale dynamics. The challenges posed by the multi-scale modelling of both natural and artificial adaptive complex systems can only be met with radically new collective strategies for research and teaching (...)


Via NESS, Complexity Digest
june holley's insight:

The study of complex systems adds a lot of depth to understanding networks.

more...
Complexity Institute's curator insight, December 6, 2013 12:56 AM

Are we ready to recognize a Science as a "Transdisciplinary Science?
Complex systems science is not a science in itself, but it may be considered as a 'Science of Sciences'.
I think this is the most challenging issue to face for a Worldwide Knowledge Society, as Paul Bourgine states.
What are your opinions about this?

Edgar Francisco Pelayo Valencia's curator insight, December 20, 2013 2:26 PM

Future is here!!!

networks and network weaving
How networks can transform our world
Curated by june holley
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Systems Thinking and the Future of Cities

Systems Thinking and the Future of Cities | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The idea that nothing exists in isolation−but only as part of a system−has long been embedded in folklore, religious scriptures, and common sense.
june holley's insight:

"The idea that nothing exists in isolation−but only as part of a system−has long been embedded in folklore, religious scriptures, and common sense. Yet, systems dynamics as a science has yet to transform the way we conduct the public business. This article first briefly explores the question of why advances in systems theory have failed to transform public policy. The second part describes the ways in which our understanding of systems is growing−not so much from theorizing, but from practical applications in agriculture, building design, and medical science. The third part focuses on whether and how that knowledge and systems science can be deployed to improve urban governance in the face of rapid climate destabilization so that sustainability becomes the norm, not the occasional success story."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Watch now: NOVA | The Pattern in Nature's Networks | PBS Video

Science shows it’s a small world after all—and nature’s networks follow a similar pattern.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Talks
Scoop.it!

What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Inspired by biological design and self-organizing systems, artist Heather Barnett co-creates with physarum polycephalum, a eukaryotic microorganism that lives in cool, moist areas. What can people learn from the semi-intelligent slime mold? Watch this talk to find out.


http://on.ted.com/sz7m


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Is Collaboration Limited by Organizational Structure?

Is Collaboration Limited by Organizational Structure? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
We've been seeking enterprise 2.0 and social business for several years now with some notable success, but still quite a lot of “vague” and some level of fatigue. Topic: Social Business.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Networks as Responsible Structures

Networks as Responsible Structures | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
There is growing awareness that current organizational structures can breed irresponsibility.  That is, arrangements are created where people are less able to be responsive in helpful ways.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Using sociometers to quantify social interaction patterns

Using sociometers to quantify social interaction patterns | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Research on human social interactions has traditionally relied on self-reports. Despite their widespread use, self-reported accounts of behaviour are prone to biases and necessarily reduce the range of behaviours, and the number of subjects, that may be studied simultaneously. The development of ever smaller sensors makes it possible to study group-level human behaviour in naturalistic settings outside research laboratories. We used such sensors, sociometers, to examine gender, talkativeness and interaction style in two different contexts. Here, we find that in the collaborative context, women were much more likely to be physically proximate to other women and were also significantly more talkative than men, especially in small groups. In contrast, there were no gender-based differences in the non-collaborative setting. Our results highlight the importance of objective measurement in the study of human behaviour, here enabling us to discern context specific, gender-based differences in interaction style.

Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Random Overlaps
Scoop.it!

Complexity: A Very Short Introduction (by John H. Holland)

The importance of complexity is well-captured by Hawking's comment: "Complexity is the science of the 21st century". From the movement of flocks of birds to the Internet, environmental sustainability, and market regulation, the study and understanding of complex non-linear systems has become highly influential over the last 30 years.

In this Very Short Introduction, one of the leading figures in the field, John Holland, introduces the key elements and conceptual framework of complexity. From complex physical systems such as fluid flow and the difficulties of predicting weather, to complex adaptive systems such as the highly diverse and interdependent ecosystems of rainforests, he combines simple, well-known examples -- Adam Smith's pin factory, Darwin's comet orchid, and Simon's 'watchmaker' -- with an account of
the approaches, involving agents and urn models, taken by complexity theory.

 

 


Via Complexity Digest, Liz Rykert
more...
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 16, 12:34 AM

Very good overrview

Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity

Build trust, embrace networks, manage complexity | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
june holley's insight:

Wonderful stuff in here!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Complexity - Complex Systems Theory
Scoop.it!

Crowdsourcing for Participatory Democracies: Efficient Elicitation of Social Choice Functions

We present theoretical and empirical results demonstrating the usefulness of voting rules for participatory democracies. We first give algorithms which efficiently elicit \epsilon-approximations to two prominent voting rules: the Borda rule and the Condorcet winner. This result circumvents previous prohibitive lower bounds and is surprisingly strong: even if the number of ideas is as large as the number of participants, each participant will only have to make a logarithmic number of comparisons, an exponential improvement over the linear number of comparisons previously needed. We demonstrate the approach in an experiment in Finland's recent off-road traffic law reform, observing that the total number of comparisons needed to achieve a fixed \epsilon approximation is linear in the number of ideas and that the constant is not large.
Finally, we note a few other experimental observations which support the use of voting rules for aggregation. First, we observe that rating, one of the common alternatives to ranking, manifested effects of bias in our data. Second, we show that very few of the topics lacked a Condorcet winner, one of the prominent negative results in voting. Finally, we show data hinting at a potential future direction: the use of partial rankings as opposed to pairwise comparisons to further decrease the elicitation time.


Via Bernard Ryefield
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Coaction versus reciprocity in continuous-time models of cooperation

Cooperating animals frequently show closely coordinated behaviours organized by a continuous flow of information between interacting partners. Such real-time coaction is not captured by the iterated prisoner׳s dilemma and other discrete-time reciprocal cooperation games, which inherently feature a delay in information exchange. Here, we study the evolution of cooperation when individuals can dynamically respond to each other׳s actions.


Via Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

A Network Way of Working: A Compilation of Considerations about Effectiveness in Networks

A Network Way of Working: A Compilation of Considerations about Effectiveness in Networks | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Networks aren’t new, but the role they play in our working lives is expanding significantly through technology. The potential for impact is great, but newly enhanced networks require new strategies.
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 18, 6:33 PM

This is an excellent article with a detailed bibliography. It would be worthwhile for School managers to read and begin to realize networks are more organic and complex than just externally ordering them and insisting they happen.

Rescooped by june holley from Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here)
Scoop.it!

‘Wisdom of the crowd’: The myths and realities

‘Wisdom of the crowd’: The myths and realities | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Are the many cleverer than the few? Phil Ball explores the latest evidence on what can make groups of people smarter – but can also make them wildly wrong.

Via Claude Emond
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 12, 10:25 AM

Some interesting observations about the way striving for consensus impacts accuracy. With misinformation, and there is an abundance, we move away from accuracy, not that we can ever know something completely.

Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

[1407.1549] Resilience of human brain functional coactivation networks under thresholding

june holley's insight:

Fascinating hints about effective networks.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Papers
Scoop.it!

Epidemic processes in complex networks

In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and socio-technical systems. The complex properties of real world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. Here we present a coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, epidemiologists, computer and social scientists share a common interest in studying epidemic spreading and rely on very similar models for the description of the diffusion of pathogens, knowledge, and innovation. For this reason, while we focus on the main results and the paradigmatic models in infectious disease modeling, we also present the major results concerning generalized social contagion processes. Finally we outline the research activity at the forefront in the study of epidemic spreading in co-evolving and time-varying networks.


Epidemic processes in complex networks
Romualdo Pastor-Satorras, Claudio Castellano, Piet Van Mieghem, Alessandro Vespignani

http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.2701


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Seeing Like a Network — The Message — Medium

Seeing Like a Network — The Message — Medium | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Don’t Call It Threat Modeling
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Talks
Scoop.it!

Interview: Prof Geoffrey West on complexity science

CLC interviewed Prof. Geoffrey West, Distinguished Professor and Past President of Sante Fe Institute, at the World Cities Summit 2014 on the study of cities in relation to complexity science....

Via Roger D. Jones, PhD, Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Network Literacy Mini-Course | Howard Rheingold

Network Literacy Mini-Course | Howard Rheingold | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Detecting Communities Based on Network Topology

Detecting Communities Based on Network Topology | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Network methods have had profound influence in many domains and disciplines in the past decade. Community structure is a very important property of complex networks, but the accurate definition of a community remains an open problem. Here we defined community based on three properties, and then propose a simple and novel framework to detect communities based on network topology. We analyzed 16 different types of networks, and compared our partitions with Infomap, LPA, Fastgreedy and Walktrap, which are popular algorithms for community detection. Most of the partitions generated using our approach compare favorably to those generated by these other algorithms. Furthermore, we define overlapping nodes that combine community structure with shortest paths. We also analyzed the E. Coli. transcriptional regulatory network in detail, and identified modules with strong functional coherence.

  


Via Ashish Umre
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 26, 3:54 PM

Community is a more complex and organic organizing than teams. Teams are inherently hierarchical with predetermined goals. Communities are fluid and the goals are continuously being negotiated. Schools and classrooms are better served to be thought of as communities with overlapping qualities and permeable boundaries with other communities.

Eli Levine's curator insight, July 29, 3:42 PM

A useful tool for policy making, because it helps identify communities and how they interact to form super-communities.

 

The essence of mapping the polity and the public, socially, economically, technologically, and infrastrucutrally.

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by june holley from Random Overlaps
Scoop.it!

Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks

Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

A number of social-ecological systems exhibit complex behavior associated with nonlinearities, bifurcations, and interaction with stochastic drivers. These systems are often prone to abrupt and unexpected instabilities and state shifts that emerge as a discontinuous response to gradual changes in environmental drivers. Predicting such behaviors is crucial to the prevention of or preparation for unwanted regime shifts. Recent research in ecology has investigated early warning signs that anticipate the divergence of univariate ecosystem dynamics from a stable attractor. To date, leading indicators of instability in systems with multiple interacting components have remained poorly investigated. This is a major limitation in the understanding of the dynamics of complex social-ecological networks. Here, we develop a theoretical framework to demonstrate that rising variance—measured, for example, by the maximum element of the covariance matrix of the network—is an effective leading indicator of network instability. We show that its reliability and robustness depend more on the sign of the interactions within the network than the network structure or noise intensity. Mutualistic, scale free and small world networks are less stable than their antagonistic or random counterparts but their instability is more reliably predicted by this leading indicator. These results provide new advances in multidimensional early warning analysis and offer a framework to evaluate the resilience of social-ecological networks.


Early Warning Signs in Social-Ecological Networks.

PLoS ONE 9(7): e101851. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101851 (2014)

Suweis Samir, D'Odorico Paolo


Code of the analysis available at https://github.com/suweis


http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0101851


Via Complexity Digest, Liz Rykert
more...
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 31, 12:24 AM

Reliably unreliable systems interacting

Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University

Metacognition | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Vanderbilt University
june holley's insight:

Group metacognition is one of the greatest sources of breakthroughs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

The End of ‘Genius’

The End of ‘Genius’ | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
The idea of the solitary creator is a myth that has outlived its usefulness.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

How collective comparisons emerge without individual comparisons of the options

Collective decisions in animal groups emerge from the actions of individuals who are unlikely to have global information. Comparative assessment of options can be valuable in decision-making. Ant colonies are excellent collective decision-makers, for example when selecting a new nest-site.


Via Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by june holley from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership

Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it

Social technologies with their inherent democratic, anti-hierarchical quality easily transcend internal and external boundaries, suddenly creating a powerful thrust for horizontal collaboration and participation. They give each and every member of an organization a creative voice and enable real-time virtual connectivity in a way we have never seen before. This makes them a great catalyst for the organizational principles that are required by the new leadership context of the 21st century.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
june holley's insight:

Some really important material on connection between leadership and social technology...

more...
Joe Boutte's curator insight, June 23, 4:54 AM

Everyday leadership integrates all modes of communications.  21st century leaders should leverage new social technologies to communicate strategy, ideas, news, and priorities.  Unleashing communications from the email treadmill to extend and enhance face-to-face and other traditional communications methods is a force multiplier for organizational leadership.

Donna Karlin's curator insight, June 24, 5:12 AM

In an increasingly global community this is critical. Collaboration across borders and in increasingly virtual work environments, a new playbook is in order.

Donna Karlin's curator insight, June 24, 5:19 AM

In an increasingly virtual work environment and global community this is critical

Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

Is being liquid enough to innovate toward policy success?

Is being liquid enough to innovate toward policy success? | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
Is being liquid enough to innovate toward policy success?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by june holley
Scoop.it!

5 differences between complexity & systems thinking | Better Evaluation

5 differences between complexity & systems thinking | Better Evaluation | networks and network weaving | Scoop.it
june holley's insight:

Really good comparison...

more...
No comment yet.