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Networked learning
News, posts and research on networked learning (for professionals). A topic co-curated with OUNL Professor Peter B. Sloep.
Curated by Steven Verjans
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Why Scoopit Is Becoming An Indispensable Learning Tool

Why Scoopit Is Becoming An Indispensable Learning Tool | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Why Scoopit Is Becoming An Indispensable Learning Tool

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Ra's curator insight, July 21, 2013 9:47 PM

Curating as a group, students identify their own input with their initials. Allows for a synthesis of ideas.

cutesqualid's curator insight, August 12, 2013 4:44 AM

great work

GwynethJones's curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:05 PM

SO true! This is my FAV new Curation tool....well, add Scoopit to MentorMob & you have a dynamic duo!

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Emergence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In philosophy, systems theory, science, and art, emergence is the way complex systems and patterns arise out of a multiplicity of relatively simple interactions. Emergence is central to the theories of integrative levels and of complex systems.

The idea of emergence has been around since at least the time of Aristotle.[1]John Stuart Mill[2] and Julian Huxley[3] are just some of the historical scientists who have written on the concept.

The term "emergent" was coined by philosopher G. H. Lewes, who wrote:

Steven Verjans's insight:

Networked learning happening amongst termites?

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A New Culture of Learning by Doug Thomas & John Seely Brown via @janbommerez

A New Culture of Learning by Doug Thomas & John Seely Brown via @janbommerez | Networked learning | Scoop.it
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Call for papers - 9th International Conference on Networked Learning

Call for papers - 9th International Conference on Networked Learning | Networked learning | Scoop.it
#Call for #papers - 9th International Conference on Networked Learning | eLearning http://t.co/GWjLrazbPz #learning
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Nuno Ricardo Oliveira's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:39 AM

Call for papers - 9th International Conference on Networked Learning

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MT: @mweller: "If education were free, what would MOOCs be?"

Here's a thought experiment, if there were no students fees and higher education were free, what would that do to MOOCs? I mean, obviously it'll never happen... oh, wait, Germany just abolished student fees.

Via Alastair Creelman, Lars-Göran Hedström
Steven Verjans's insight:

On a global level, higher education policies appear to show two tendencies: more public funding leading to cheaper enrollment fees (Germany, Finland) vs. less public funding and higher tuition fees (UK, US, Netherlands). It is interesting to reflect on how these tendencies affect the future of MOOCs...

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Duke University Leaves Semester Online

Duke University Leaves Semester Online | Networked learning | Scoop.it
The move to leave Semester Online, which offers undergraduate classes for credit, comes after faculty members expressed concerns.

Via verstelle
Steven Verjans's insight:

Is this part of the Hype cycle? Teaching staff are concerned that the offering of massive online courses (MOOCs) is too far removed from their core business and unique position (e.g. discussion based learning). Or: can networked learning really substitute in-depth face-to-face learning?

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verstelle's curator insight, May 1, 2013 4:34 AM

Conclusion of the article:

"Faculty concerns about the spread of online courses may be on the rise. Just two weeks ago, faculty members at Amherst College voted against participating in edX, the nonprofit collaboration founded by Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, citing concerns about costs and about how “massive open online courses” would affect a residential campus devoted to small discussion classes."

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The Evolution of Social Business: Six Stages of Social Media Transformation

Companies are not created equal when it comes to social media maturity. In its latest research, Altimeter Group’s Charlene Li and Brian Solis uncovered a dist

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Steven Verjans's insight:

I like the analysis part, but not so much the normative organisational design part. I don't feel you can have general one-size-fits-all recipes for getting the most out of social media within business. Creativity, serendipity and innovation are crucial, but very hard to 'design' or plan.

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steffenbieser's curator insight, March 13, 2013 12:41 PM

This is a brainer !

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Social media is helping workers become more productive | News | WBS

Social media is helping workers become more productive | News | WBS | Networked learning | Scoop.it
New research shows that the multitude of digital devices and social media actually help people work rather than hinder them.
Steven Verjans's insight:

Note: the researchers state: "knowledge workers who were able to successfully deal with the timing and sequence of their ‘presence’ and responses in a digitally mediated workplace were better able to organise the flow of work through digital media.” The crux of the matter seems to be in being able to effectively and efficiently deal with online presence.

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TidBITS: How to Set Up and Use Google+ Hangouts | Adam C. Engst - Tidbits

TidBITS: How to Set Up and Use Google+ Hangouts | Adam C. Engst - Tidbits | Networked learning | Scoop.it

Want to do an Internet video call with up to nine other people, with reliable audio and video, plus the option to make it public and record the entire event? Google+ Hangouts do a better job than any other solution we've tried, for free.

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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 26, 2013 6:09 AM

Networked learning by definition uses all kinds of online tools to support learning. Those tools are often classified as web 2.0 or social web tools, although tools that facilitate information seeking and management still play an important role. Google+ is one of the social tools, that facilitates synchronous communication like many others, but is particularly interesting for its seamless integration with the rest of the Google toolbox. The article explains how to set it up - don't forget to read the comments! - and use it.(@pbsloep)

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Living in the age where "knowing" may be obsolete: Interview with Sugata Mitra by Steve Wheeler

Living in the age where "knowing" may be obsolete: Interview with Sugata Mitra by Steve Wheeler | Networked learning | Scoop.it

The media and education worlds have been buzzing over the last few days about the work of a quiet, unassuming Indian born professor. Born in Calcutta in 1952, Sugata Mitra started his academic career in computational and molecular science. His later research also encompassed biological science and energy storage systems. Mitra has also researched diversely into areas such as medicine (Alzheimer’s disease and memory research) and psychology (perception in hypermedia environments) and he received a PhD in Physics for his studies into organic semi-conductors. It is not hard to see why some have hailed him as a polymath and even ‘something of a genius’. Most recently, Professor Mitra won the prestigiousTED prize of 1 million US dollars acknowledgement of his work setting up computer kiosks in developing rural areas, and for his studies into ‘minimally invasive education’. He is now Professor of Educational Technology at Newcastle University, in the North East of England. I managed to catch up with him to interrupt his busy schedule for a brief interview ahead of his keynote at the EDEN 2013 Oslo conference.


Via CM Elias
Steven Verjans's insight:

I have always liked Sugata Mitra's approach, but some of his statements about the history of the current educational system are decidedly biased. As if schools hadn't changed since the Victorian age. A good reply by Mike Caulfield (thanks to @FleurUni) can be found on http://hapgood.us/2013/03/04/an-institution-is-not-an-invention-heretical-thoughts-on-mitra/

Also Donald Clark writes a very critical blogpost: http://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.ca/2013/03/sugata-mitra-slum-chic-7-reasons-for.html

My own view: Most schools that I know in Belgium and The Netherlands apply a mix of progressive and conservative ideas, even though the teacher-centric paradigm seems to be prevalent. Any contribution that tries to shake up this situation is welcome, but it should be supported by more than just anecdotal evidence.

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Steven Verjans's comment, March 22, 2013 4:19 AM
Check out Stephen Downes collection of critical comments: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=60059
verstelle's curator insight, March 23, 2013 4:18 AM

Many of the inspiring ideas of Sugata Mitra are presented often and therefore well known; this one was new for me: 


Steve: What is your vision for education in the next 10 years? What do you think needs to be done next?

Sugata: We need to rethink the curriculum, rethink assessment and rethink certification in an age where 'knowing' may be obsolete. Homo Sapiens will transition to Homo Deus in the next 50 years. Our preoccupation will be with meaning and creation. Knowing will not be our main interest - creating will. In order to create we will need to know things. When we need to know something we will have the means and the capacity to do so in minutes. A page of erudite text may take an educated person an hour to understand. A century ago it would have taken a month. A thousand years ago, a year or more. We could extrapolate to a time when it will take us a minute to understand. A generation or two later, one second. 

The human brain is evolving faster than anything has, ever before.   

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After Moodle: on open learning, connectivism, and #PLE by @downes

After Moodle: on open learning, connectivism, and #PLE by @downes | Networked learning | Scoop.it
In this talk I discuss what will be coming 'After Moodle' by means of a discussion of open learning, connectivism, and personal learning environments, including See it on Scoop.it, via Connectivism and Networked Learning...
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Using peer–support to connect learning network participants to each other: an interdisciplinary approach - International Journal of Learning Technology - Volume 7, Number 4/2012 - Inderscience Publ...

Using peer–support to connect learning network participants to each other: an interdisciplinary approach - International Journal of Learning Technology - Volume 7, Number 4/2012 - Inderscience Publ... | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Steven Verjans's insight:

Publication by our colleagues of the Open University. "Ad-hoc transient groups (AHTGs) seem to foster social capital on the level of relationship characteristics and mutual support. Results on sense of connectedness were inconclusive. It is concluded that AHTGs have a decentralising effect, making the network less dependent on a few key participants." Now my question is, within the Social capital way of thinking, whether connectedness is the key to long-term learning partnerships, or whether transience is an integral part of networked learning. In other words, what's the value of investing in long-term learning connections?

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Paulo Moekotte's comment, February 26, 2013 2:05 PM
Quite interesting to see that you're investigating 'ad hoc' and 'transient' connections and end up with the question about lasting learning connections in networks. I guess that whenever the connections seem to outlast the fulfillment of primary short term goals and needs, network relations might transform to more 'community like' relations. This 'difference' in characterizing the relations does resonate with the gradual difference that Wenger, Trayner and De Laat make, when talking about networks and communities. And this difference can even be traced back to the way Howard Rheingold differentiated networks and communities.

With regard to the decentralising effect it could probably be interesting to investigate if this effect can be related to what Mejias calls paranodality, i.e. an effect residing in between nodes that can distort a nodocentric view or paradigm that is typical for the network. Mejias even states that paranodality is a necessity in order to prevent networks to turn into echo chambers, i.e. exert a nodocentric view. So not only the number of nodes that are influential might generate this decentralizing effect but probably also the paradigmatic 'space' between the nodes and paranodal tendencies of certain nodes.

Furhtermore I would like to point out the blogposts of Kai Pata, who is involved in the IST 7th Framework Learning Layers project, about differences between communities and networks and classical principles of CoP's (http://tihane.wordpress.com/).

Coming back to your questions about the 'value' of investing in long term learning connections. The answer may even be as simple as that people like to flock with like minded. The primary networkbased connection that was more 'object oriented' (the 'object oriented sociality' described by Knorr Cetina and elaborated by Engeström) can evolve to 'people oriented sociality' (can be traced back to Rheingolds concept of 'virtual community' and related to Jenkins' concept of 'participatory culture') were the 'learning' is more socially and culturally contextualised and determined and less professionally.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, February 28, 2013 5:03 AM
Paulo, it makes a lot of sense what your write. I have been thinking for several years already about i) how to differentiate communities and networks, ii) how to use these notions to describe the dynamics of online social networks. For me, but I don't think for Etienne Wenger, the network is the more encompassing entity, which consists of lots of partly overlapping communities. People constantly update their relationship with communities, strengthening or weakening the links with people in the communities. People in communities have a shared goal, and work together towards achieving that. Once that goal is reached, the community loses its function for them. Networks are not just collections of people who are organized in communities, they also are a valuable resource of people who could potentially become members of communities, helping to achieve the community's goal. I have never worked this out in full depth, however, the first attempt can be found here (http://hdl.handle.net/1820/1198). It is a paper given at a rather obscure conference in New Zealand, which is why it is difficult to access. I is called Fostering Sociability in Learning Networks through ad-hoc transient communities.
Paulo Moekotte's comment, March 2, 2013 2:45 PM
Peter, thanks for pointing to your article. I'll take a look at it.
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No. 3 aha moment: asynchronous is (generally) better than synchronous online teaching

No. 3 aha moment: asynchronous is (generally) better than synchronous online teaching | Networked learning | Scoop.it

Via Verena Roberts
Steven Verjans's insight:

Number 3 in a series of 7 reflections on online learning and teaching by Tony Bates.

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Verena Roberts's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:21 AM

Proof of great asynchronous learning

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Content Curation Tools: The Organized Supermap of Over 400 Services

Content Curation Tools: The Organized Supermap of Over 400 Services | Networked learning | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Steven Verjans's insight:

A Pearltree curated by Robin Good that categorizes and organizes content curation tools. Very good starting point for people new to content curation.

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Alex Grech's curator insight, August 9, 2013 11:35 AM

My current absorption with Pearltrees started with an exploration of Robin Good's incredible structure.  To be studied, admired and shared.

Loli Olmos's curator insight, August 19, 2013 7:35 PM

¡Excelente! ¡Menudo trabajo!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 12, 2014 9:50 AM

Content Curation Tools: The Organized Supermap of Over 400 Services

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Integral Theory: Understanding Your Business from a Truly Holistic Perspective via @janbommerez

Integral Theory: Understanding Your Business from a Truly Holistic Perspective via @janbommerez | Networked learning | Scoop.it
I recently finished reading the book A Brief History of Everything, by Ken Wilber, who I first wrote about last year in a post entitled "An Integral Approach to Marketing." I have wanted to read th...
Steven Verjans's insight:

Expansion of the model by Burton & Obel on dynamic fit. importance of culture and passion. Also mportant for learning cultures

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The Ed Techie: You can stop worrying about MOOCs now

The Ed Techie: You can stop worrying about MOOCs now | Networked learning | Scoop.it
I guess we all knew the MOOC bubble would burst sometime, but I'm saying it's happened this week - it just doesn't know it yet. The reason? Commercial MOOC providers have started making noises about becoming elearning courseware providers for...
Steven Verjans's insight:

The hype cycle at work. Question now: how to align MOOCs with your institutional learning strategy?

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Half an Hour: MOOC - The Resurgence of Community in Online Learning

Steven Verjans's insight:

After the hype?

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Scoop.it integrates with Yammer to supercharge enterprise social media

Scoop.it integrates with Yammer to supercharge enterprise social media | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Be gone, irritating chain email about a fake virus scare that your head of HR sent out! Away, pictures of a random offsite meeting that no one actually cares about!
Steven Verjans's insight:

Now you can integrate your social Intranet with your external content curation! Brilliant!

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Unser Rotation Curation Twitter-Account | Vodafone case by @mgn #SoMeRWE

Unser Rotation Curation Twitter-Account | Vodafone case by @mgn #SoMeRWE | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Unter @being_Vodafone twittert jede Woche ein neuer Mitarbeiter über seinen Arbeitsalltag und seine Erfahrungen bei Vodafone.
Steven Verjans's insight:

Interesing new concept for me: rotation curation

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Knowledge Management: Creating a Social Intranet Where Your Employees can Learn

Knowledge Management: Creating a Social Intranet Where Your Employees can Learn | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Knowledge Management: Creating a Social Intranet Where Your Employees can Learn, Elizabeth Lupfer, the social workplace, 9 April 2013 "Collaboration has become more than just a hot topic. It’s now ...

Via steve batchelder
Steven Verjans's insight:

Important sentence: "We are seeing that the best intranets are those that are integrating social technologies that not only drive community and collaboration, but also knowledge management."

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Evolution of the networked enterprise: Survey results - McKinsey Quarterly - High Tech - Strategy & Analysis

Evolution of the networked enterprise: Survey results - McKinsey Quarterly - High Tech - Strategy & Analysis | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Executives report that the adoption of social-media tools at their companies is high—and that this usage could spur additional benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly High Tech article.

Via Fred Zimny
Steven Verjans's insight:

The networked enterprise: how does Higher Education prepare its students?

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Fred Zimny's curator insight, March 28, 2013 9:57 AM

Over a surprisingly brief period, the use of social tools and technologies has grown from limited experimentation at the edge of corporate practice to what’s now the mainstream. But after this strong initial uptake, many companies find themselves at a crossroads: if they want to capture a new wave of benefits, they’ll need to change the ways they manage and organize themselves, according to the results from our sixth annual survey on the business use of these technologies.1 A remarkable 83 percent of respondents say their companies are using at least one social technology, and 65 percent say employees at their companies access at least one tool on a mobile device. Ninety percent of executives whose companies use social technologies report measurable benefits from these tools, and what’s more, a small yet growing number of companies—the most skilled and intensive technology users—are racking up outsize benefits.2

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Donald Clark Plan B: MOOCs: ‘dropout’ a category mistake, look at ‘uptake’?

Donald Clark Plan B: MOOCs: ‘dropout’ a category mistake, look at ‘uptake’? | Networked learning | Scoop.it

Is it inappropriate to take the word ‘dropout’ from one context and stamp it upon another? With MOOCs I’d call it a category mistake, when a word is used to mean one thing (pejoratively) in the context of a long school, college or University course, then applied with the same pejorative force to a very different type of learning experience


Via verstelle, Frederik Truyen
Steven Verjans's insight:

Maybe the discussion of MOOC 'dropout' can fuel the discussion of mental dropout in traditional face-to-face university education?

 

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verstelle's curator insight, March 23, 2013 7:03 AM

Great posting!


Just a few quotes:Lot’s of people don’t finish books but we don’t see this as a sign of intellectual failure. In fact, it can be a sign of efficient learning and research. MOOCs must not be seen as failure factories. They must rise above the education models that filter and weed out learners through failure.
Good MOOCs will allow you to truly go at your own pace, to stop and start, go off on an exploratory path and return again. This is what true adult learning is and should be. They should not copy but complement or construct new models of learning.
MOOCs encourage the ‘look see’ approach to learning We need to look at uptake, not dropout. Dropout is a highly pejorative term that comes from ‘schooling’. The ‘high school dropout’. He’s ‘dropped out of ‘University’. It's this pathological view of education that has got us into this mess in the first place. MOOCs are NOT school, they eschew the lecture hall and are more about learning than teaching. MOOCs, like BOOKs, need to be seen as widely available opportunities, not compulsory attendance schooling.  via @fagotissimo
Frederik Truyen's curator insight, March 23, 2013 7:42 AM

Interesting read point of view from Donald Clark

drsmetty's curator insight, April 2, 2013 9:54 AM

Is a school dropout = MOOC dropout? Interesting note by Donald Clark. 

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Where does managed learning stop and self-managed learning begin?

Where does managed learning stop and self-managed learning begin? | Networked learning | Scoop.it
I was recently asked this question: Where does “managed learning” stop and “self-managed” learning begin? So I created a chart ,which I am sharing below, to visualise my tho...
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MOOC completion rates | Katy Jordan - MoocMoocher

MOOC completion rates | Katy Jordan - MoocMoocher | Networked learning | Scoop.it

While Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) may allow free education on an enormous scale, one of the biggest criticisms raised about MOOCs is that although thousands enrol for courses, a very small proportion actually complete the course. The release of information about enrollment and completion rates from MOOCs appears to be ad hoc at the moment - that is, official statistics are not published for every course. This data visualisation draws together information about enrollment numbers and completion rates from across online news stories and blogs.


Via Peter B. Sloep
Steven Verjans's insight:

I tend to agree with Inge (@Ignatia) that MOOC's may be instrumental in (re-)shaping continuous professional development, rather than substituting complete initial academic degrees (Bachelor or Master). Another opportunity is that MOOCs act as elective courses in full academic programmes, and thus enable virtual student mobility. Students can then extend their learning network during their initial study.

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PaigeCuffe's curator insight, March 3, 2013 12:17 PM

The best collection of numbers related to mooc participation I've seen - so far.  'Participation' is a difficult thing to identify and define in the original cMOOC formats, where it is possible to visit without signing in so whilst unique visitor numbers can be extracted for the core site, engagement is difficult/ not possible to ascertain for these mooc formats.  It is much clearer in xMOOCs, where sign-in is required and often fixed assignments are presented.  In addition, in cMOOCs, and especially in the longer lasting ones (e.g. the 9 month #Change11) the notion of 'participation' isn't based on weekly attendance but on accessing those resources and conversations of interest to that participant. 

So evaluating retention may be an illusion other than for some xMOOCs.

The comments on this blog are worth a careful read, they open discussion on many of the more nuanced points around completion v participation v 'persistence'.  The language used to discuss this is not trivial, as some terms shift responsibility for performance between provider and learner.

Jon Dron's comment, March 3, 2013 8:15 PM
@Peter - the confusion of threaded forums is largely avoided in bigger MOOCs, where most dialogue is involved in problem-solving so rapid responsiveness trumps complexity. In the early Coursera offerings, median response time in forums was 22 minutes, 24 hours a day, which is not bad! However, there are also other communities that develop in both formal and informal settings, Facebook, Twitter, etc, so there are more diverse opportunities to form communities. xMOOCs are overlaid with cMOOC-like networks. I prefer 'persistence rate' too.
catspyjamasnz's comment, March 17, 2013 8:18 AM
The completion rates of MOOCs should not be compared to university completion rates. Compare it rather to the number of people who read your course brochure, and then the number of students who actually enrolled and completed.
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A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories [Infographic]

A Simple Guide To 4 Complex Learning Theories [Infographic] | Networked learning | Scoop.it
Do you know the actual theories of learning? A learning theory is an attempt to describe how people learn, helping us understand this inherently complex process.

Via Gust MEES, Made Hery Santosa, Roselink, Carmen Arias , Rui Guimarães Lima, Alfredo Calderon, REDaprendiendo, Laura Rosillo, Carlos Marcelo, Elena Elliniadou, Nikos Amanatidis
Steven Verjans's insight:

Very interesting overview of learning theories.

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Kari Smith's curator insight, February 17, 2013 1:17 PM

Great background information to build our understanding. I really like seeing them all presented this way for easy comparison. 

uTOP Inria's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:38 AM

(Edudemic - 24 Déc 2012)

Christine Cattermole's curator insight, May 16, 2013 4:58 AM

A very visual illustration of learning theory.