Networked Learnin...
Follow
Find
20.8K views | +1 today
Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Anything on matters of online, networked learning and training
Curated by Peter B. Sloep
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Discovery learning is the new higher learning | Globe and Mail | Don Tapscott

Discovery learning is the new higher learning | Globe and Mail | Don Tapscott | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
If universities want to prosper, they need to embrace a new model of pedagogy that encourages collaboration outside the classroom...

 

Comment: networked learning is becoming mainstream. The Canadian, hight-quality newspaper Globe and Mail has a professor of management (not an learning scientist!) write about tomorrow's universities. The bottom line is networked learning, with online resources, actively engaged students (hence the 'discovery learning, I suppose), teachers as guides (rather than sages). Tapscott sees the transformation of universities to take shape in three stages: "The network would have stages or levels. The first is content exchange – professors park their teaching materials online for others to use freely. The second level is content co-innovation, where teachers collaborate and share ideas across boundaries to co-create new teaching materials using wikis and other tools. By the third stage, the university changes from being a place to being a node in the global network of faculty, students and institutions learning collaboratively, while maintaining its identity, campus and brand."

Much of this is already available, of course. Open Educational resources as a movement has been with us for a decade. Attempts to have teachers collaborate are on foot, though not so successful. Networked Learning as conception of learning was formulated 10 year ago. So what's keeping us? Perhaps the resistance of universities to change? (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Grammar and syntax make their MOOC debut in course taught by Stanford scientist

Grammar and syntax make their MOOC debut in course taught by Stanford scientist | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Stanford epidemiologist Kristin Sainani has been teaching a writing course to thousands of scientists and would-be scientists who find cell structure easier to master than sentence structure.

Comment Nice story if only because you would guess that teaching people to write involves a lot of one-to-one interactions. Not so, apparently. Although it would require taking the course really to find out, the report already gives away de clues as how Sainani pills it off (peter sloep, @pbsloep)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

The Crucible: MOOC Planning – Part 8 | Keith Devlin

The Crucible: MOOC Planning – Part 8 | Keith Devlin | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"As I have followed the forum discussions in my MOOC, I have started to wonder if one thing that MOOCs can give to mathematics higher education in spades is a mechanism to provide a real bridge between K-12 education and life in the world that follows. By coming together in a large, albeit virtual community, the precision-seeking individuals who want clear rules and guidelines to follow find themselves side-by-side (actually, keyboard-to-keyboard) with others (perhaps with weak formal mathematics skills) more used to approaching open-ended, novel problems of the kind the real world throws up all the time. If so, that would make the MOOC a powerful crucible that would benefit both groups, and thus society at large."

 

Comment: Keith Devlin reports on his experiences with a mathematics course that seeks to bridge the gap between high school and university type mathematics. The blog offers a view on what it takes to host a MOOC from the lecturer's point of view. The conclusion underscores comments I have made to recent MOOC posts: they become interesting in particular if we see them as an experiment with learning technology, and not if we view them -  naively, I would say, - as a money making machine (peter sloep; @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

RRTeaching: Preparing for the MOOC-ocalypse | Rosie Redfield

RRTeaching: Preparing for the MOOC-ocalypse | Rosie Redfield | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"A UBC colleague who's also going to be producing a Coursera course got me thinking about the future of the university. [...] Contemplating this for very long leads one to various philosophical considerations, such as "Since Coursera courses are free, why would students pay to go to university?" and then "Yikes, what will become of my job??!!!" "

 

Comment: the line of argument followed in this essay is a familiar one: MOOCs are there to stay, there are all these apocalyptic predictions about the disappearance of colleges and universities as we know them, hence, to stay employed, I'd better make the student experience worth their money. Apart from the observation that it is a bit ironic that only now that jobs are on the line we start thinking about giving value for money, there are many problems with this kind of argument.

 

First, Rosie argues from the assumption that MOOC-courses are bound to improve shortly. I am not so sure, I actually think that on the average, when more people jump on the MOOC bandwagon, the quality will go down. Yes, the better courses may be tweaked to offer a better learning experience, for instance by replacing the fora with more intelligent ones that help the learner find sensible stuff amongst the massive number of not-so-useful entries.

 

Second, Rosie guesses that flipped classrooms, which provide tutoring next to a (free) MOOC, won't convince the students. That depends, I would say. Read Jonathan Marks' contribution, sitting next to this one. Also, she believes "nobody knows enough about how learning works to do a credible job of this". That simply isn't true. There is a long tradition of research on distance education which explains how to do this online and much research on learning in face-to-face settings other than classrooms and lecture halls which offers valuable insights (see my blog on Katie Vale's presentation, below). It is true, though, that this research has often been ignored by people used to and happy with ordinary lecturing.

 

Third, Rosie then concludes that "[...] one advantage a university gains by offering Coursera courses is that the enormous numbers of students and the online record-keeping make it possible to collect unprecedented amounts of data about student learning. But in practice most of the data will be worthless unless we carefully design our courses as learning experiments.' Under the label of learning analytics such data collection is already taking place and delivering insights. And, yes, it does make sense to carefully design courses as learning experiments. That is precisely what Harvard is doing with its EdX platform (again, see Kathie Vale). I would hope many more colleges start to do so, designing other learning environments than the default lecture hall and learn from the experience.

 

In summary, I don't believe the apocalyptic predictions about MOOCs for one minute. The educational landscape, shaped by learning needs and wants on the one hand and forms and environments for learning on the other, is too vast and rugged to be surveyd to the full by a search party led by commercial MOOC providers alone. However, it is a good thing we start to question the traditional, much trodden roads to learning. If that is what they manage to achieve, we should thank them for that. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

How to improve teaching with technologies? | Peter Sloep

How to improve teaching with technologies?  | Peter Sloep | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Indeed, it is perhaps necessary to acknowledge that the dichotomy of xMOOCs and cMOOCs may still be valid, but that the xMOOC comes in two varieties: the for-profit ones, such as Udacity and Coursera, that are funded by venture capital; and the not-for-profit ones, that are funded through donations. EdX exemplifies this second kind. Making the distinction is necessary when evaluating the value of these MOOCs. I am anxious to hear how Harvard will evaluate their MOOCs."

 

Peter B. Sloep's insight:

blog post of mine on a seminar Technology Enhanced Learning. Although only a minor part of the entire seminar, it was good to note that xMOOCs come in two kinds, as indicated. (@pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

25 Tips to Make the Most of a MOOC - Online College Search - by site administrator

25 Tips to Make the Most of a MOOC - Online College Search - by site administrator | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
We share 25 ways to stay in the loop, on task, and get the most out of your MOOC, or massive online open course, experience.

 

Comment: giving mainly practical advice, the post focusses on cMOOCs, although many of its 25 tips would also work for xMOOCs. The tips go from the obvious (get connected, complete major projects) to the sensible (don't be overwhelming) and handy (designate an email address) (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

MOOC's and the McDonaldization of Global Higher Education - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Jason Lane & Kevin Kinser

MOOC's and the McDonaldization of Global Higher Education - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Jason Lane & Kevin Kinser | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"[…] thousands of students across the world taking the same course, with the same content, from the same instructor. And that is the problem. MOOC’s are now at the forefront of the McDonaldization of higher education. […] MOOC’s do little to foster engagement or cross-cultural understanding, and in most cases don’t offer students a credential. […] A multinational university can’t simply be a broadcasting service to recipients in other countries; it must engage with and learn from other cultures. The “massive” element of MOOC’s and most other technological initiatives has a homogenizing effect that makes this sort of engagement unlikely. […] MOOC’s may provide access to a world-class education, but the product is prepackaged and standardized. And, because it is readily available, it risks diminishing both the diversification of the higher-education sector and the advancement of globally engaged students and institutions."

 

Comment: elaborate argument, summarised in the above, why it is not a good idea to see MOOCs as the solution to the low quality of education in some parts of the world (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

A true(er) history of MOOCs | Open and Networked Learning | Leigh Blackall

A true(er) history of MOOCs | Open and Networked Learning | Leigh Blackall | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"So, what am I to do, when drawn into discussions at La Trobe referencing MOOC? Is it an opportunity to create space for the development of open and networked educational practices, or is the shallowness of interest and awareness ultimately a barrier to such an effort? Is the time right, in other words?"

 

Comment: an outcry for help by the main author of the Wikipedia article on networked learning. I am sure many of us are forced into the position Leigh finds himself in. To be fair, universities cannot afford to remain on the sidelines. When education is evermore seen as a market in which universities compete for students, you cannot simply dismiss seemingly successful attempts to attract those students. It's got nothing to do with pedagogy and everything with economy. Perhaps that should also be the reaction: if this is about numbers, jump that bandwagon; if this is about superb pedagogy, there sure are better ways. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Building Democratic Learning by Fred Garnett

Building Democratic Learning by Fred Garnett | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"MOOC growth now is about US Universities winning the race in the globalised education market, whilst we are raising fees, and failing to improve the learning experience on offer, at our widening participation Universities. [...] I don’t see MOOCs transforming education into a participatory learning process ... I don’t see that Connectivism MOOCs are creating distributed knowledge either [...] The MOOC is just a box in which institutions are trying to capture this evolving practice [of networked learning, ps] so they can sell it; [...] We need to radically change institutional behaviours, and educational policy, examining how these might be transformed in the emerging Network Society, but we aren’t addressing those issues.

 

Comment: highly recommended post and not just because Fred refers to these scoop.it pages. The post contains a welter of insights and practical suggestions, situated around the ideal of open learning policies. Quoting the blog post, in practical terms this means: "

a) Develop a Community of Innovators ...
b) Develop learning design skills which are based on new 21st Century pedagogies …
c) Design learning experiences that offer complexity, authenticity and engagement ...

d) develop them for the society in which we wish to live, for me that is building participatory democratic processes ..."

(peters sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter B. Sloep from Connectivism and Networked Learning
Scoop.it!

Flipping The MOOC? by Jeff Borden

Flipping The MOOC? by Jeff Borden | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

MOOCs already need an overhaul. Let's get to "version 2" as soon as possible.

 

Comment: a by now familiar criticism of xMOOCs (they represent the worst in teaching as we know it), yet useful for its slightly larger depth of analysis (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


Via suifaijohnmak
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

What's learning? A way to approach the question, in response to Steve Wheeler | Stories to TEL, Peter Sloep

"In this post, I will not try to solve the question Steve asks nor will I attempt to analyse whether Connectivism is the learning theory he is looking for. The questions are too difficult, have too many ramifications to be able to answer them in the context of a simple blog post. However, I will make some observations that may help to arrive at an answer."

 

Comment: Blog post of mine on the question (asked by Steve Wheeler a few weeks ago): What is learning? Networked learning and Connectivism feature large (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

The Crisis in Higher Education - Technology Review | by Nicholas Carr

The Crisis in Higher Education - Technology Review | by Nicholas Carr | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Online versions of college courses are attracting hundreds of thousands of students, millions of dollars in funding, and accolades from university administrators. Is this a fad, or is higher education about to get the overhaul it needs?

 

A balanced, well-informed, highly informative if only very USA-oriented discussion of cMOOCs, their (short) history, their claimed benefits, as well as some criticisms levelled at them. I can't really summarize the richness, for those who want to get the gist of it, this is the concluding paragraph: "At least as daunting as the technical challenges will be the existential questions that online instruction raises for universities. No matter whether massive open courses live up to their hype or not, they will force college administrators and professors to reconsider many of their assumptions about the form and meaning of teaching. For better or worse, the Net's disruptive forces have arrived at the gates of academia." (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

The Social Media Guide to Growing Your Personal Learning Network » Online College Search by Melissa Venable at Online College.org

The Social Media Guide to Growing Your Personal Learning Network » Online College Search by Melissa Venable at Online College.org | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Check out our guide to growing your personal learning network with social media, full of more than 30 different tips, resources, and tools

 

Comment: although directed at educational professionals, the tips are useful for anybody who wants to populate a PLN with social media tools and learn with them.  (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Should the liberal arts change the MOOC landscape? | Matthew Trevett-Smith

Should the liberal arts change the MOOC landscape? | Matthew Trevett-Smith | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Under this model [of active participation], online learning becomes a knowledge creation process, not a Podcast consumption process. ... faculty become more than bearers of knowledge (or a voice transmitted via earbuds), they become learning architects, modelers, learning concierges, change agents, synthesizers, connected learning incubator, and network gurus"

 

Comments: yet another, but eloquent voice in the choire of teachers who are bewildered by the frenzy about MOOCs. Matthew is specifically wondering about the role liberal arts colleges, such as Harvard, play in this seemingly self-destructive move.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

More Regulation Only Way to Stop Social Networks Learning More Than We Wish, Says Researcher | Loek Essers

More Regulation Only Way to Stop Social Networks Learning More Than We Wish, Says Researcher | Loek Essers | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Social networks have no incentive to inform users how data is gathered on them, a privacy researcher says...

 

Comment: not really news of scoop quality, yet important enough to reiterate. It is not so much the data per se, but what may be inferred from them, for example by cross referencing them, that should scare us. Clever technologies may help protect users, but what really helps is more powerful regulatory bodies. As many governments are themselves keen on inferences from the large collections of data they posses, I can't seem them putting much effort in empowering regulatory bodies. See also blogs of mine recently referenced here, on September 16th and one on August 31st (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

MOOCS: 12 Reasons for universities not to panic by Paul

MOOCS: 12 Reasons for universities not to panic by Paul | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Don’t believe the hype? There has been an extraordinary level of hype in higher education (and beyond) about Massive Open Online Courses or MOOCs. Vice-Chancellors and their senior management...

 

Comment: blog post that urges university management not to panic over the advent of xMOOCs. Paul mentions 12 reasons, all well know, but the force of the argument is in their listing them one below the other: no business model, no credits, no quality assurance, no standards ... Interesting is also his point that, without universities, we could not have MOOCs (who would create the content for it?), effectively invalidating Sebastian Thrun's argument that there is room for 10 universities only (I am not sure, however, whether Thrun means in the world or in the US). Remarkable is Paul's assurance that if the Open University doesn't panic, there is no reason for other universities to do so. Who after all would be in a better position to assess the reality of the MOOC threat?

However, we should not be complacent either. If so many people sign up for a MOOC, they do something right and regular universities something wrong. Interestingly, this is exactly the reasion why Harvard set up EdX, the not-for-profit xMOOC they maintain (see my blog about Katie Vale below: How to improve teaching with technologies). One of the things MOOCs seem to do right is increasing accessibility. Luckily, this is attempted by many more than just the MOOCers. The UNESCO supported movement for Open Educational Resources, begun with the MIT Open Courseware initiative and expanded since then to encompass many more universities, also tries to do this. So even to the admonition not to be complacent, people have already reacted. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Why MOOCs won't replace traditional instruction | Inside Higher Ed | Jonathan Marks

Why MOOCs won't replace traditional instruction | Inside Higher Ed | Jonathan Marks | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Coursera offers [...] classes and teachers united by nothing apart from its platform to students who are expected to know what they want and to pursue it with minimal guidance. In this sense, while Coursera’s mission of open access is democratic, its education is elitist, designed for those who already possess the judgment, independence, and discipline to teach themselves well."

 

Comment: in the series of scooped blogs written by people who actually experienced a MOOC hands-on, this is a well written and well thought-through essay by a college professor who took a Coursera course to find out if it would really threaten his job. His answer is 'no', his argument that college students are not up to self-guided learning and will never be as they also need formation, which you can't get online. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter B. Sloep from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

ePortfolios - ePortfolios with GoogleApps by Helen Barrett

ePortfolios  - ePortfolios with GoogleApps by Helen Barrett | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"This Google Site has been set up by Dr. Helen Barrett to focus on the use of Google Apps to create ePortfolios. On this site, there are instructions on how to use the different elements of Google Apps to maintain e-portfolio."

 

Comment: the diagram, indeed the entire site from which it was extracted, are not new in the sense that they were created yesterday. No real scoop therefore. However, a solid piece of work needs to be put in the limelight every so often, lest we forget it is there (thanks to Ana Cristina for doing so).

The diagram is useful in that it (re)draws attention to the two entirely different use ones can make of a portfolio, as a tool to reflect on what you have been doing and as a tool to present your achievements to a specific audience. Portfolio software exists, usually provided by schools. Although nominally such portfolios are portable, in actual fact they are hardly ever ported and thus go against the very grain of what any portfolio should be: yours! Helen describes how Google tools may be used to bring that ideal closer: use the docs for storage, the blogs for reflection, the sites for presentation. Of course, schools still have to buy into this. Even so, these Google-built portfolio are ideal for the lifelong learner, the professional learner, the self-guided learner, in short, the informal learner, for whom the portfolio software that is on the market makes no sense.

Parenthetically, the still running EU-funded TRAILER project  http://grial.usal.es/agora/trailerproject/#.UG6hQrQxBD0  attempts to integrate informal and formal learning experiences with each other in an ePortfolio context (disclaimer: I am involved in this project so biased on its usefulness!). (peter sloep, @pbsloep).


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Reading the MOOC Tea Leaves - The EvoLLLution | Ray Schroeder

"The expansion of Massive Open Online Courses has seen significant changes in the way higher education is delivered and has raised many questions about how the industry’s landscape will continue to shift as they continue to spread into the market"

 

Comment: A rather US-centric but nevertheless insightful view on MOOCs by Ray Schroeder. He sees three factors that fuelled the advent of xMOOCs (fully ignoring the historically older cMOOCs): the Internet, the financial crisis, the tuition hike in the USA.  Google's getting involved via its Course Builder platform and Moody's - you know that company that failed to see the financial crisis brewing - assessment of MOOCs as disrupting the age old university business model, Ray sees as signs that the tea is brewing: "Given the rapidity of these developments, it may not be long before we can make a definitive reading on a vision of the future of the higher education marketplace"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Massively Open Online Course (MOOC) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Massively Open Online Course (MOOC) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

Comment: Key MOOC resources as collected by EDUCAUSE (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Reciprocity: Understanding online social relations | First Monday | E. Pelaprat & B. Brown

Reciprocity: Understanding online social relations | First Monday | E. Pelaprat & B. Brown | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Reciprocity is a key concept for understanding social behaviour. It involves complex interactions of giving and returning. This paper examines the concept of reciprocity to think about, and design for, online social interactions. We argue that reciprocal exchange is symbolic insofar as it produces and enacts many forms of social life by drawing individuals into a relation of recognition."

 

Comment: full paper, so you need some time to read it all through, but it is well  worth the effort. If you are in a hurry, skip the middle part in which the authors attack Peter Pirolli and Peter Kollock for providing useful, but incomplete accounts of online social behaviour (of which networked learning is of course an example). They also attack Rational Choice Theory, which assumes that people 'are in it' for a profit. They have an alternative approach, based in mutual recognition through symbolic gifts, which makes much sense, even though I fail to see how it necssarily invalidates RCT or game theory. In my view, theirs is just another level descriptive apparatus that with some effort may be brought in line with, say, game theory. A symbolic gift has symbolic value (that is, value that is imparted on it by the receiver and sender). This value could be the start of the utility computations that game theory typically works with. However, this does not detract from the value of their descriptive apparatus for _designing_ social online environments, such as learning networks. Such a design allows for encounters, which afford symbolic exchange and, as a consequence thereof, mutual recognition of participants.

For example and if I interprete them correctly, Scoop.it could be improved if a more direct interaction between posters and readers were possible (encounter). My gift is symbolic, this scoop, but what I get in return cannot be attributed to particular people (my score is an aggregated measure of the behaviour of my readers, rendered through an opaque algorithm). So there's no real encounter. To remedy this situation, I tweet about all my scoops and the recognition then is afforded by Twitter, outside of Scoop.it. Actually, since Scoop.it stimulates me to use other social media for this, their choice of not affording direct encounter may not be such a bad one. 

(peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

A Pioneer in Online Education Tries a MOOC - The Chronicle of Higher Education - Ann Kirschner

A Pioneer in Online Education Tries a MOOC - The Chronicle of Higher Education - Ann Kirschner | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

" A course is not a book but a journey, led by an expert, and taken in the company of fellow travelers on a common quest for knowledge. My MOOC had those elements, albeit in a pretty crude form. [...] It is too soon to declare MOOC's either a silly fad or a silver bullet. But it is not too soon to declare 2012 the year that the public finally understood the potential for adult learning on a global scale."

 

Comment: Ann Kirschner participated in a MOOC and describes her experience. An intereresting twist is that she herself was involved in runnin a proto-MOOC, several years ago, so her judgement, which is quite balanced, counts for something. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

Clasificación de Redes Sociales para educación by Juan José de Haro

Clasificación de Redes Sociales para educación by Juan José de Haro | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Hola: Una infografía con una Clasificación de Redes Sociales para educación.

 

Comment: even if you don't read any Spanish and do not realise immediately this is about a classification of social networks for education, the image contains enough gems that having a look pays dividend. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
Marketing Redes y Política's curator insight, February 9, 4:23 PM

Clasificación de Redes Sociales para el sector eduacación

Scooped by Peter B. Sloep
Scoop.it!

What Connectivism Is ~ Stephen's Web | by Stephen Downes

What Connectivism Is ~ Stephen's Web | by Stephen Downes | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Knowledge is, on this theory [of Connectivism], _literally_ the set of connections formed by actions and experience. It may consist in part of linguistic structures, but it is not essentially based in linguistic structures, and the properties and constraints of linguistic structures are not the properties and constraints of connectivism. In connectivism, a phrase like 'constructing meaning' makes no sense."

 

Comment: a brief but clear and telling explanation of connectivism qua theory of knowledge. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter B. Sloep from Social network data analysis
Scoop.it!

Social Networks, Individuals and Small Worlds by Remko Helms

Comment: in this presentation, Remko Helms connects social networking analysis techniques with networked learning, in particular he analysis how particular characteristics of social networking affect networked learning and knowledge sharing. Some hightlights: slide 7 is a sociogram depicting the effects of knowledge drain because of employees retiringslide; slide 36 shows the difference between the familiar, formal organisation chart (tree) and the actual network of links people in the organisation maintain; slide 44 has some interesting, empirical conclusions: i) isolated individuals and subgroups are to be avoided as they miss out on the transfer of tacit knowledge, ii) employees should be selective about their learning relations, more isn't better, iii) mutual learning relations among experts and among novices should be stimulated; slide 45 has two questions for further research how do communities evolve over time and become successful, what is the role of the interaction between newbies and oldies in this?

Although the presentation focuses on companies and the employee networks therein, the reflections, conclusions and questions apply, mutatis mutandis, equally well to the personal networks people maintain for learning or to course-bound networks that arise spontaneously or are set up by learning institutions

(peter sloep, @pbsloep)


Via ukituki, eRelations
more...
No comment yet.