Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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Anything on matters of online, networked learning and training
Curated by Peter B. Sloep
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The Digital You Matters: Identity in the Internet Age | Visual.ly

The Digital You Matters: Identity in the Internet Age | Visual.ly | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"You’ve heard it before: we live in a digital age. It’s not news that today nearly every one of us has a digital identity formed by the data that exists about us online."

 

Comment: I have scooped about this before, between August 31 and September 16 of this year (with links to blog posts of mine). A rich and accessible online (learner) identity is conducive to online learning (via the recommenders that use those data), but at the same poses a significant privacy threat. This is especially true because there are so many companies out there that are only interested in our online identities as a means to make money through advertising. The present scoop does not add a much deeper insight into this dilemma, but it does a good job of sketching the extent of our online identies. Now you can assess your opportunities and risks while at least being better informed. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Instructional Design Connectivism - by George Siemens

Instructional Design Connectivism - by George Siemens | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Articulate - The leader in rapid e-learning and communications.

 

Comment: if you have half an hour to spare and want to hear it from the horse's mouth,  listen to George Siemens on networked learning and connectivism, on knowledge, on what is wrong with instructional design, on why we need complexity and chaos, and more. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 2014 3:22 AM
Instructional Design Connectivism - by George Siemens
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The emergence of MOOCs – Part 1 | Sui Fai John Mak

The emergence of MOOCs – Part 1 | Sui Fai John Mak | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"The current popularity of MOOCs is like the running of Olympic Games, where different MOOCs are competing with each others in a global arena of education. ... The emergence of MOOCs has touched the nerves of many college and educational leaders. ... 

There is an urgent need to conduct mega-research of MOOCs and critical reviews into current pedagogy adopted by Higher Education institutions. Further research into the educational values and value proposition of MOOCs is necessary to unearth its long term potential in re-creating or revolutionizing Higher Education."

 

Comment:  A useful attempt to inventory the current state of affairs with respect to MOOCs. Quoting work by others, John treats such questions as What is a MOOC?, Wat are the paradoxes in MOOCs?. What are the most significant problems in MOOCS?, to conclude that 'there is an urgent need to do mega-research on MOOCs". I am not convinced, really. I have a hunch that a good analysis of what is offered in the light of the existing literature will reveal that many MOOCs fly in the face of good educational practice, of all we already have discovered and is described in the literature (Sir John Daniel and Tony Bates espouse this argument). For what is left, relatively small-scale experiments will do, such as the experiments Harvard tries to do with its EdX. (peter sloep, @pbsloep) 

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Brainstorm in Progress: MOOCs and Connectivist Instructional Design | Geoff Cain

Brainstorm in Progress: MOOCs and Connectivist Instructional Design | Geoff Cain | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Based on the principles of connectivism, learning should:
- Provide for a diversity of opinions
- Allow students to create connections between specialized nodes and learning sources
- Foster their capacity to learn (teach metacognitive learning skills)
- Increase their ability see connections between fields, concepts, and ideas
- Teach students to build networks that will allow students to keep current in their field
- Allow students to choose what to learn and how"

 

Comment: Connectivism definitely struck a chord with Geoff Cain and he writes with enthousiasm about cMOOCs and how he sees them work for the kind of (distance) education he is responsible for. Nice, first-hand account of someone's experience with cMOOCs. Although I certainly sympathize with his lofty goals, I am not so sure his high hopes pan out the way he expects, particularly not with distance-ed students who are always pressed for time. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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MOOCs, Motivation, and the Mass Movement toward Open Education | Hans de Zwart

MOOCs, Motivation, and the Mass Movement toward Open Education | Hans de Zwart | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Curtis Bonk led a session about MOOCs at Learning 2012. His slides are available at TrainingShare (this is the direct link). His presentation must have been one of the most insanely paced sessions ...

 

Comment: the blog post is more extensive. It starts off with the question what is a MOOC (and recommends the Curtis Bonk presentation), then it covers history, MOOC instructor guidelines, types of MOOCs,  and finally business guidelines. All four parts are enriched with online available materials, such as the Curtis Bonk talk.

Note, in relation to the adjoining scooop: Hans de Zwart also notices the value of student data and points out that MOOC platforms avoid the term student but in stead talk about participants. Talking students would have restricted their data use under FERPA, the (US) family educational rights and privacy act!  (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Exploring Web 2 . 0 Applications as a Mean of Bolstering up Knowledge Management | Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management | Thomas Bebensee et al.

" How can organizations use Web 2.0 applications for managing knowledge and which impact do they have on KM [knowledge management]? ... Jashapara defines KM as “the effective learning process associated with exploring, exploitation and sharing of human knowledge that use the appropriate technology and cultural environments to enhance an organization‟s intellectual capital and performance”. ... Web 2.0 is the reorientation of the Web that promotes unbounded interaction, collaboration and participation of people. It is characterized by the emergence of a large amount of content generated by a collective of Internet users. It harnesses networking effects and leverages the long tail. ... The research suggests that analytical KM, asset management, developmental KM and innovation & creation may benefit from the adoption of Web 2.0 applications. Depending on the organizational culture these applications may even lead to a novel kind of KM. This new approach to KM would not just benefit from a technology enhancement of the existing applications, but also lead to a new understanding of KM that is based on user contributions, a novel way of unbounded collaboration and leveraging the long tail of user interaction data. In our opinion, it would therefore be appropriate to refer to this as KM 2.0."

 

Comment: of course, the above quotes cannot do justice to an article that spans several pages. Also, it is not exactly a scoop in that it was published about a year ago. Finally, prima facie, knowledge management (KM) hardly counts as networked learning. And yet, I felt it is worthwhile to draw attention to the paper.

First and starting with the last objection, it is striking to notice how much knowledge management uses a kind of language that is similar if not identital to the language that is used for learning. What if anyting is knowledge sharing if not learning from each other? Also, where the present paper talks Web 2.0 and knowledge sharing and creating, I am inclined to talk the "net" and networked learning. This paper therefore makes distinctions and uses categories that are also useful, very useful I would argue, in the context of networked learning. How about drawing attention to serving the long tail or fostering creativity? Second, where the present paper takes the organisation as its starting point but then looks at the behaviour of indidual members of those organisations, networked learning starts with the individual (as in personal learning networks) but then looks at the collective (as in social networks) effects thereof. Again very much complementary views, the contrasting of which should bear fruit for networked learning and knowledge management. And finally, I thought it important to draw attention to the paper as it highlights an aspect of networked learning that is hardly paid attention to, no doubt in part because of the MOOC hype that exemplifies school-oriented forms of learning. That aspect is networked learning by professionals. As this paper shows, often this goed by the name of knowledge management but people do learn, from each other and with each other, in organisational contexts. It is time networked learning began to take informal learning of individuals in organisations seriously, is this paper's main message in my view. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Two paradoxes at the heart of MOOCs | Learning Innovation | by Niall Sclater

"[I] want to set down two paradoxes that it seems to me are at the heart of the MOOC movement.

Paradox 1: Most MOOCs are offered by elite institutions which don’t need to expand their student base

...

Paradox 2: Highly successful MOOCs attack the core business of those who are offering them"

 

Comment: MOOCs have been around for a few years now, the hype around them started about half a year ago. Time has come to take stock, it seems. The Open University's Niall Sclater does so by identifying two puzzling facts about xMOOCs. He concludes: "MOOC-based qualifications will have to be very good and much cheaper to gain ground in an increasingly competitive market." (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Final Lecture: MOOC Planning – Part 9 | by Keith Devlin

Final Lecture: MOOC Planning – Part 9 | by Keith Devlin | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
A real-time chronicle of a seasoned professor embarking on his first massively open online course. I gave my last lecture of the course yesterday (discounting the tutorial session that will go out ...

 

Comment: I have reported on this course twice more often, I think. It is a first-hand account of the experiences of Keith Devlin, the professor that designed and 'gave' this MOOC. This final installment wraps up his experiences, including some reflections on what worked and what not, what it means for a MOOC to be successful and what it takes to organise on. Nothing of deep academic insights, but very useful and certainly engaging (peter sloep, @pbsloep).

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Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To | Edutopia | Idit Harel Caperton

Before We Flip Classrooms, Let's Rethink What We're Flipping To | Edutopia | Idit Harel Caperton | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Investors are salivating at the prospect of getting into an education market with an estimated global value of $54 billion; social and academic entrepreneurs want to provide free education opportunities for the poor; and at the same time, media organizations are falling all over themselves trying to come up with the right model to replace the textbook and other print materials. ... It seems to me that some recent MOOCs and start-up ideas -- which at the outset appear exciting and promising -- are basically indifferent to what we know about what constitutes good learning. All of a sudden, John Dewey, Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky, Maria Montessori, Seymour Papert, Jerome Bruner, Howard Gardner, Allan Collins, John Seely Brown -- more than 100 years of theory about cognition and learning-by-doing -- are being forgotten."

 

Comment: a very balanced and well argued rebuttal to the current MOOC hype. The conclusion is that we need both Instructionism (as exemplified by xMOOCs) and Constructivism (as conceived by Seymour Papert), depending on the learning challenge at hand. (peter sloep, @pbsloep) 

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GraduateDiplomaOfeLearning's curator insight, March 23, 2013 5:20 AM

I agree with a lot of what is said in this writing.

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OER Quality Standards

OER Quality Standards | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"From David Wiley's blog [http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/2568 ]:

 

The topic of OER quality standards came up at #OpenEd12 today. It makes me a little crazy. Why, why why, do we continue to focus on indirect proxies for quality when we’re capable of measuring quality directly?

 

Stephen Downes comments on this at http://www.downes.ca/post/59252

"If we agree that the only measure of quality of an open educational resource (OER) is "Degree to which the OER facilitates student learning" the David Wiley's table makes sense. Otherwise, we might want to reconsider. For example, an OER might facilitate learning - but of information that is known to be false (or worse: propaganda). That is not "better". Moreover, the degree to which it is true, measured via a standard of precision, is also important. The relevance of the truth also matters. That is why such criteria as 'author qualifications' are used to evaluate OERs. Though I would agree, Wiley's straw man example - "an OER written by a top author that is 700 pages long and chock full or gorgeous artwork, simulations, and video?" - would certainly be a bad one. I have nothing against quality. But I don't think it is simply defined via a single metric." "

 

Comment: Although I do not touch all that often on the issue of OERs in these pages on networked learning, access to online accessible content is a crucial ingredient of the networked learning experience. Quality then automatically becomes an issue, in particular how networked learners may assess quality. Wiley is right about quality being related to facilitating learning, but the bad news is that quality thus defined is a disposition, something that only shows if used. Downes is right that you want people to learn things that are true, the bad news here is that we have been known to get things wrong occasionally (falsehoods being held for truths). I would like to add to these this the degree to which an independent learner is able to assess quality at the outset. An independent learning is taking the risk of investing time that turns out to be wasted. So part of quality is the ability to assess quality. Because of the two issues just mentioned, which are part of an OER's quality, I am afraid we can only go by a proxy, an OER's reputation: who's using it, what do they use it for, what's their reputation, who's reccommended it, what is their reputation, in whose repository does it sit, what is their reputation, etc. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Online Privacy & Ownership by Nelson Zagalo

32 slides' presentation about privacy and ownership in an online world

 

Comment: Nelson argues that being the social animal that we are, we will always tolerate invasions of our privacy and we will always be willing to support people who produce interesting experiences, if they are works of art or something else. I have argued elsewhere on these pages for the necessity to pay attention to privacy matters when learning online: networked learning only thrives if we are willing to let our private spaces be invaded; up to a point of course. Similarly, networked learning can only thrive if content is lavishly made avaiable, in the form of OERs, for example; but somehow this content needs to be paid for, even if it is free. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)


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Will the Real MOOC Please Stand-up |online learning insights | by Debbie Morrison

Will the Real MOOC Please Stand-up |online learning insights | by Debbie Morrison | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Marginal Revolution University created by  professors Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok is the latest entrant into the MOOC market and is the real thing. It’s a Massive Open Online Course that ap...

 

Comment: comparison of a new examplar of a cMOOC with xMOOCs. The new MOOC is created by economists Cowan and Tabarrok, is founded on connectivist principles and is called Marginal Revolution University. This post is mainly interesting in that it reports - and does so well - on others following cMOOC principles (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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My First MOOC | Novel Technology | carlispina

"While the grading was a drawback of my Coursera experience, overall, I really enjoyed my first MOOC. Especially given that students do not have to pay to participate in these courses, I think they are well worth consideration. I would definitely recommend checking out available MOOCs if you are interested in learning a new subject!"

 

Comment: another example of someone experiencing an xMOOC first hand (on gamification). A balanced review, overall enthusiastic with serious reservations regarding the peer grading (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Are we right to fear computers in education – or in life? | Tony Bates

Are we right to fear computers in education – or in life? | Tony Bates | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Thus my belief (how will a computer handle that?) is that computers are wonderful tools for supporting teaching and learning, and as cognitive and computer scientists become more knowledgeable, computers will increase in value in meeting this purpose as time goes on, . However it means that these scientists need to work collaboratively, and more importantly as equals, with teachers and indeed learners, to ensure that computers are used in ways that respect not only the complexity of teaching and learning, but also the value systems that underpin a liberal education.
And it is here that I have the most concerns. There is, especially in the United States of America, a growing ideology that considers teachers to be ineffective or redundant and which seeks means to replace teachers with computers. Coursera-style MOOCs are just one example. Multiple-choice testing and open educational resources in the format of iTunes and OpenCourseWare are other examples."

 

Comment: thoughtful and entertaining blog post by Tony Bates, a brave attempt to say something quite in general about computers in education. After voicing a number of concerns, such as the advent of cMOOCs, he concludes that "None of these concerns undermine my belief that computers, when used appropriately, can and do bring enormous benefits to teaching and learning. We shouldn’t anthropomorphize computers (they don’t like it) but, as I learned from ‘Downton Abbey’, like all good servants, they need to know their place." I would conclude that we should not fear computers, but perhaps we should fear the people who want to replace teachers by them(peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Jordan Alixondria T-p's curator insight, May 6, 2013 2:03 AM

After reading this, I want you to answer two questions.

1. Do you believe that we will someday be able to simulate the brain by 2018? If so, how do you think it will impact the world and yourself?

2. Why do you believe computers and technology is such an important part of learning? If you do not believe computers are an important part of learning, explain, using information from the article.

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Coursera strikes MOOC licensing deal with Antioch University | Inside Higher Ed | Steve Kolowich

Coursera strikes MOOC licensing deal with Antioch University | Inside Higher Ed | Steve Kolowich | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Coursera, the largest provider of massive open online courses (MOOCs), has entered into a contract to license several of the courses it has built with its university partners to Antioch University, which would offer versions of the MOOCs for credit as part of a bachelor’s degree program"

 

Comment: an interesting development. Antioch is a company that will share its revenues with Coursera, which will share back to the participating universities, which own the IP to the courses they have brought in. Of course, first actual money has to be made, but one may see here the bare bones of a business model (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Faculty Senate grapples with the possibilities and challenges of online learning | R.F.Mackay

Faculty Senate grapples with the possibilities and challenges of online learning | R.F.Mackay | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
John Mitchell, vice provost for online learning, outlines progress in online teaching and learning and hears both praise and skepticism.

 

Comment: a report on a meeting of the Standford Senate in which online learing was discussed. Although nothing really new is being said and no deep insights are revealed, it is interesting to read how Stanford professors themselves think about their efforts to create MOOCs and about the 3 platforms they work with. Those include Coursera, set up by Stanford's Daphne Koller, and Class2Go, an open and highly flexible platform of their own making. There's no strategy that all agree on and there is a lot of experimenting, as elsewhere. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Will MOOCs destroy academia? | ACM | Moshe Vardi

Will MOOCs destroy academia? | ACM | Moshe Vardi | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"Early rhetoric about the educational value of MOOCs was quite lofty, talking about the goal of reaching the quality of individual tutoring, but it is difficult to reconcile such rhetoric with massiveness as an essential feature of MOOCs. ... To understand the real significance of MOOCs you must consider the financial situation in which U.S. colleges and universities have found themselves in the aftermath of the Great Recession. ... My fear is the financial pressures will dominate educational consideration. ... If I had my wish, I would wave a wand and make MOOCs disappear, but I am afraid that we have let the genie of the bottle."

 

Comment: Moshe Vardi is editor of the venerable publication Communications of the ACM. If the above quotes have wetted your appetite, read the entire article, it's one page only and well worth reading! (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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The ethics of MOOC research | Rough Type |Nicholas Carr

"I have no reason to think that Coursera, or any other MOOC, has anything but noble intentions when it comes to data collection and data mining. I certainly believe that the leaders of the companies are motivated by a desire to improve education. But Coursera is a for-profit business, backed by venture capitalists. Sooner or later, it will have to make money, and, given the current excitement in Silicon Valley and elsewhere about the commercial potential of “Big Data,” it seems inevitable that the company and its investors will explore “other business purposes” for its data, including ones that would bring in revenues."

 

Comment: a well argued blog post that should give some pause for thought. It is ironic that universities who themselves want to engage in this kind of big data research will have to convince ethical boards before starting off; it is also ironic that they do not seem to have access to all the data they collect in the context of their own course. Come to think of it, I wonder who owns the copyrights on the materials the students contribute. I had a quick look at the contract http://tiny.cc/vp2rmw but student's rights are not mentioned explicitly. From the little I understand, student-contributed content is either part of the platform and Coursera has the rights, or it is in the public domain and Coursera shares the rights with the participating university. Either way, this puts MOOC providers on a par with all modern social media providers, who provide a service for the right to use your data at will. Students beware! (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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Thinking In Network Terms | Conversation | Edge | Albert-László Barabási

Thinking In Network Terms | Conversation | Edge | Albert-László Barabási | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"We always lived in a connected world, except we were not so much aware of it. We were aware of it down the line, that we're not independent from our environment, that we're not independent of the people around us. We are not independent of the many economic and other forces. But for decades we never perceived connectedness as being quantifiable, as being something that we can describe, that we can measure, that we have ways of quantifying the process. That has changed drastically in the last decade, at many, many different levels.

...

It is almost common sense now that we live in the age of networks. What most people haven't really internalized is that these networks are not random. They have internal rules. Once you start seeing them, then you start looking at the very different way of how these networks function. The number of highly connected or less-connected nodes is never random in the network. The way they break down, the way they evolve is never random in these networks. The way that hubs link to their neighborhood, the way the community is formed, the way the communities look, their number, their size, they all follow very precise laws and very quantifiable patterns."

 

Comment:  Some excerpts from an hour-long interview (held September 24, 2012), a transcript of which has been made available. In my view, which owes a lot to Barabási and many others for that matter, the relevance of network science for the understanding of networked learning is the following: studying networks in the abstract, discovering ways to describe them, discovering the rules that govern (social) networks, all of that bears relevance to our understanding of networked learning and our understanding of how we may manipulate networks to foster learning. This holds true over and above the pedagogical or learning-theoretic insights that need to go into designing learning networks. Network science provides both the descriptive apparatus to talk about networked learning and the set of rules that constrain the social learning that networked learning is. This is of course my conception of how network science is relevant to networked learning, Barabási talks social science in general, not learning in particular. (peter sloep  @pbsloep)

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MOOCs will never replace traditional higher ed | Minnesota Daily | Trent Kays

MOOCs will never replace traditional higher ed | Minnesota Daily | Trent Kays | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"The concept of a MOOC predates the digital age. The intellectual underpinnings of MOOCs date to around the 1960s, when early Internet pioneers discussed massive collaboration via a network of connected computers. ... There certainly are positive attributes to MOOCs. They can encourage peer-to-peer learning, collaboration across regions and the ability to easily dive into an exciting and new subject. ... [But l]ike higher education, MOOCs aren’t for everyone. Yet, more than that, MOOCs signify something from which higher education should be moving away.  ... For all the publicity, MOOCs often become nothing more than a glorified content and learning management system. Knowledge is deposited inside the MOOC, and the students or participants drink from the fountain of knowledge."

 

Comment: No doubt, the Minnesota Daily felt it needed to write something about MOOCs in view of the recent refusal of the state to allow Coursera to peddle their courses to Minnesota citizens. The arguments that Kay Trent aduces are not really new, when compared to the multitude of arguments that so far have been voiced. Perhaps the only new thing is that Kays refuses to see a fundamental differences between xMOOCs and cMOOCs: "Despite [their pedagogical] distinctions, all MOOCs have something in common: privilege. Meaning, one must have access to a stable Internet connection, a sturdy computer, time to engage with the material and basic digital-literacy skills to participate." I don't think, though, that is they key issue. With time, computer access will become ubiquitous and digital literacies will be spread widely, if only because they are taught in high school. However, that stillwouldn't make MOOCs a suitable replacement for traditional higher ed. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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The Role of Content Curator in Workplace Learning | E-Learning Academy | Alison Bickford

The Role of Content Curator in Workplace Learning | E-Learning Academy | Alison Bickford | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it
Content curation is a growing trend, helping those who are time poor to stay abreast of specific topics. Curators are an unrealised resource for workplace learning.

Comment: Alison really only alerts us to the opportunities that content curation should have for Workplace Learning, although she does add a few pointers for those interested in traveling this route. But she has a very good point. There is a snag, though. I suppose in corporate environments going public as a content curator exposes one to critique by those higher up in the command chain and less convinced of the value of content curation of 'wasting company time'. This in contrast to teachers, many of whom are already maintaining PLNs and engaging in social networking. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)
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Will MOOCs open elite universities to excessive corporate influence? | Inside Higher Ed | Mark Edmundson

Will MOOCs open elite universities to excessive corporate influence? | Inside Higher Ed | Mark Edmundson | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

"It’s possible that the incursion of the Internet market into the universities will be something like the incursion of big-time college sports. There are any number of American schools that appear now to have been swallowed by their sports programs. ... Something similar may happen with Internet education. Certain colleges may become addicted to the revenue that Internet courses draw and they will deform themselves in the attempt to make more and more money. They will adulterate their intellectual goods for the marketplace and perhaps those goods will sell briskly. "

 

Comment: Yet another pebble in the pond of opinions on how MOOCs might affect education, and a good one at that. The piece ends in an optimistic note: "The quest for truth will always collide in time with the quest for profits." I hope with the author that this is how the story ends. But once you allow money to dictate academic values, there's no real going back, I fear. Look at the film industry (the author himself mentions Hollywood), the music industry. Financial gain is the great homogeniser, we should never allow it to even aspire to that role in academia.  

Note: For now, the bleak scenario applies to the USA in particular, but ever more countries in the world seem to be wiling to organise themselves in such a way that financial arguments are the ultimate and only judge of the policies they choose to adopt and ignore. If that is true, nobody is immune to the scenario sketched here. (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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The Global One Room Schoolhouse: John Seely Brown (Highlights from JSB's Keynote at DML2012)

An animated highlight of John Seely Brown's Keynote Presentation, "Cultivating the Entrepreneurial Learner in the 21st Century," at the 2012 Digital Media an...

 

Comment: wonderful animation, great talk by a distinguished member of the scientific community. How to go from homo sapiens to the home faber and home ludens whom the networked age needs? Short on empirical evidence to support the story, long on powerful arguments to convince you. Highly recommended (somehow, we'll collect the evidence :-) (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

 

Note: if you miss the picture, so do I (MacOs with Safari). Just click the link to youtube below it.


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MOOCS: The new higher education? - Jim Farmer

MOOCS: The new higher education? - Jim Farmer | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

There is a bubble, in that lots of organisations are thinking that they “have to get on board with MOOCs [Massive Open Online Courses] or be left behind”, says Seb Schmoller

 

Comment: Largely quoting from discussions held at the UK's Association for Learning Technology forum, Jim provides a balanced acoount of how to answer the question of whether MOOCs are the new higher education. He extensively quotes Dianne Laurillard, OU UK pundit and known from such books as 'Rethinking University Education' and 'Teaching as a Design Science'. She concludes that xMOOCs cannot provide education, though they may have a role in education: "“MOOCs can be ‘educational’ in the way that TV programmes can be, and when we try them out, as I think we certainly should, we should be trying to extend the format to be more supportive of the learner, while respecting the ‘Massive’ aspect. But a genuine MOOC could never provide the kind of personal feedback to the learner that is the essence of education (along with useful certification of what they have learned). That is the labour-intensive variable cost of education that requires the teaching staff to be massive too. Automated intelligent personalised feedback to learners on the basis of their actions is one of the grand challenges that learning technologies have not yet stepped up to, sadly. I do believe there is potential for that.”

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Online learning group hears from MOOC pioneer | Inside Higher Ed | Doug Lederman

Online learning group hears from MOOC pioneer | Inside Higher Ed | Doug Lederman | Networked Learning - MOOCs and more | Scoop.it

Comment: report of the 18th Sloan-C's International Conference on Online Learning, The report focuses on current experiences with MOOCs. It first discussesMOOC  the skepticism of Jack Wilson, president emeritus of the University of Massachusetts system and Distinguished Professor of Higher Education, Emerging Technologies, and Innovation at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell ("They're certainly not the first movers; they're not even the fast followers"). It then goes on to report on a talk by Udacity founder and Google exec Sebastian Thrun. Amidst apologetic remarks about his kind of MOOC ("I'm not the first to think about online education"), he concluded rather safely that "that online education is undoubtedly the future". xMOOC pundits are beginning to see they are part of a wider history. That's good, it can only help find out how online learning should be shaped (as EdX explicitly claims to want) for our knowledge hungry world (peter sloep, @pbsloep)

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