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Rescooped by Joel Field from Cyberwarfare & Security
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Stanford University on Stuxnet and Cyber Warfare

The Stuxnet computer worm is perhaps the most complicated piece of malicious software ever built; roughly 50 times the size of the typical computer virus. It...

Via Nathan Fisher
Joel Field's insight:

Very interesting video on a new devastating virus that was recently used to attempt to harm a Nuclear Plant in Iran. The program was been coded with logic so complicated that the virus was 10 times bigger then any known virus. The worm was able to work flawlessly on two completely different operating systems( Windows and the Programmable Logic Controller) and spread itself over the Nuclear network. This virus was able to remain undetected for months whilst performing actions via the control room computer's. The biggest fear regarding this worm is that it used everyday technology to accomplish its task. It understood many flaws in the windows operating system in order to work and was able to bypass anti-virus systems by using stolen certificates from trusted organisations. This article also highlights more so how careless some people can be(although in this case it seems likely to have been an inside job to get the virus into the plant).

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Nathan Fisher's curator insight, March 18, 2014 11:57 PM

A video from Stanford University analyses the Stuxnet virus' methods of attacking the Iranian nuclear enrichment facility.

 

The Stuxnet virus is a worrying issue that many computer and engineering professionals worry about. The virus has the ability to destroy hardware of very important machinery without being detected.

 

This huge cyber threat has created a blowout to cyber security and shows the potential threat of future computers viruses.

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Huge hack 'is ugly sign of future'

Huge hack 'is ugly sign of future' | Network Security | Scoop.it
A massive attack that exploited a key vulnerability in the infrastructure of the internet is the "start of ugly things to come", it has been warned.
Joel Field's insight:

It is concerning that DDos attacks are still as effective and prevalent as they were many years ago. It seems technology leaps forward in every department but protection against DDos attacks is lagging behind. Some good news is the talk of new technology that is able to detect large amounts of data heading to one destination before shutting off the connection.

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Hacking attacks doubled since 2011 - Views and News from Norway

Hacking attacks doubled since 2011. March 18, 2014. Norway's defense industry, technology firms and state agencies were all the regular targets of computer spying attacks last year, according to the state national security authority.
Joel Field's insight:

This article reporting on cyber attacks in Norway brings up a interesting point. At what point will governments take military initiative to attacks from other countries? In another article on my Scoop page it was mentioned that Barack Obama initiated a cyber attack on a terrorist group and that terrorist group was highly angered by that. The kinds of attacks from terrorist groups is largely information extraction and DDos attacks at this point. The concerning thing is that these terrorist groups have no problem attacking huge corporations and governments so it is safe to assume they will continue to do so with stronger weapons as technology advances.

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Joel Field's comment, March 24, 2014 12:03 AM
Shows that hacking is becoming more and more a tool for people who simply want change or want to prove a point rather then steal money. These people are probably harder to fend off since their target or method isn't as predictable.
Nathan Fisher's curator insight, March 28, 2014 12:30 AM

The Norwegian National Security Authority has revealed that the number of cyber attacks have doubled since 2011. They explain that they are constantly under attack and at an increasing rate.

 

As outlined in other scoops, the amount of cyber threats has surged over the past decade and it is not slowing down. Governments are establishing new agencies to specially combat this increasing threat.

 

 

Rescooped by Joel Field from Open Internet
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Cyberspace and the Changing Nature of Warfare

Cyberspace and the Changing Nature of Warfare | Network Security | Scoop.it
Strategists must be aware that part of every political and military conflict will take place on the internet, says Kenneth Geers.

Via Nathan Fisher, Christopher Adams
Joel Field's insight:

A good look into the transformation of political and military conflicts. Every conflict now has a cyber aspect that can drastically effect the outcome of the real world conflicts. Experts conclude that the criminals have the most advantage on the internet. There is far more damage they can do there while remaining hidden. One of the biggest threats to governments is data manipulation. Criminals get access to extremely sensitive information and modify or delete parts. Considering that people have to make important decisions based on this information it is easy to see how there could be extreme real world ramifications. An example would be government infrastructure that has links to military weapons.

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Nathan Fisher's curator insight, March 19, 2014 12:05 AM

This article from SC magazine takes a look into the past cyber warfare acts committed and provides an insight on the future state of cyber crimes.

 

The Estonia cyber attacks in 2007 will be looked back in the future and be remembered as the turning point in cyberwarfare. It shows that there is a demand for cyber security experts to protect IT-dependent countries.

 

Cyberware and security's demand will exponentially increase in the future due to availability of new technologies by almost everyone in the general public.

 

Christopher Adams's curator insight, March 20, 2014 11:48 PM

Good scoop by Nathan. It's a point of interest to look into when looking into more available internet with freedom of use. Every person knows how aware they have to be of criminals but this shouldn't be a reason to restrict our cyber rights. People need to be more informed into the matter as cyberspace changes and grows.

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Cloud Computing: A Way to Reduce Risk? - BankInfoSecurity.com

Cloud Computing: A Way to Reduce Risk? - BankInfoSecurity.com | Network Security | Scoop.it
BankInfoSecurity.com
Cloud Computing: A Way to Reduce Risk?
BankInfoSecurity.com
Spafford also serves as executive director of the Purdue Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security.
Joel Field's insight:

An interesting insight into information management. Using the new cloud technology to store less important data would obviously make the important local data easier to manage. This approach is more about accepting the dangers of the internet and adapting to them rather then investing in newer and ''better'' network security systems to protect data. By moving large amounts of less important information the company would have a much easier time investigating leaks and weaknesses in the storage of their important data.

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Cyber Intelligence Report - Defense Update

Cyber Intelligence Report - Defense Update | Network Security | Scoop.it
Cyber Intelligence Report Defense Update The cyber consulting company, Cyber Hat, reported the spread of the Cryptolocker malware in some Israeli companies, which is a ransomware deployed to a company network by phishing and encrypts files onto the...
Joel Field's insight:

This article just proves more and more that we are entering the age where war is more and more done on the internet. These people are not motivated by money.  They want to prove a point, attack companies who they feel are overstepping boundaries or simply attack governments who have disrespected or offended their culture. Some of these people may have simply protested in the past but have picked up internet weapons because of the anonymity available by doing so. 

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