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21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates

21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates | Network learning | Scoop.it

Our students need to be comfortable with the information technologies that are inextricably linked to the 21st century skills the work place requires, and teachers need to help pave the way.


Via Nik Peachey
Peter Evans's insight:

I'd suggest a lot of the more innovative university programmes are already doing much of what is suggested here. One thing to emphasise is supporting students to use digital tools specifically for learning as they generally already know how to use these tools. In otherwords, while students may often be digitally competent, they are often less digitally literate in terms of learning processes. Also, what refer to PDAs - surely old tech?

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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:44 AM

Core foundations of 21 century learning.  

Jean-Claude Domenjoz's curator insight, November 15, 2013 1:19 AM

Liste des compétences:

http://www.imls.gov/about/21st_century_skills_list.aspx

 

VISUAL LITERACY

Demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate, and understand information presented through visible actions, objects and symbols, natural or man-made

 

Miep Carstensen's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:14 PM

Sound advice for teachers to incorprate these core competencies in their teaching programmes.

 

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Performative Materiality and Theoretical Approaches to Interface by Johanna Drucker | DHQ

Performative Materiality and Theoretical Approaches to Interface by Johanna Drucker | DHQ | Network learning | Scoop.it

This article outlines a critical framework for a theory of performative materiality and its potential application to interface design from a humanistic perspective. Discussions of the materiality of digital media have become richer and more complex in the last decade, calling the literal, physical, and networked qualities of digital artifacts and systems to attention. This article extends those discussions by reconnecting them to a longer history of investigations of materiality and the specificity of media in critical theory and aesthetics. In addition, it introduces the concept of performative materiality, the enacted and event-based character of digital activity supported by those literal, physical conditions, and introduces the theoretical concerns that attach to that rubric. Performative materiality is based on the conviction that a system should be understood by what it does, not only how it is structured. As digital humanities matures, it can benefit from a re-engagement with the mainstream principles of critical theory on which a model of performative materiality is based. The article takes these ideas into a more focused look at how we might move towards integrating this model and critical principles into a model of humanistic interface design.


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Business School, Disrupted

Business School, Disrupted | Network learning | Scoop.it
In moving into online education, Harvard Business School discovered that it isn’t so easy to practice what it teaches.
Peter Evans's insight:

This is a fairly long article on HBS move in to online learning. For me, it is an example of how the assumptions that "MOOCs = online learning" are dominating and corrupting analysis of digital education and education innovation. 

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Google Alert for the Soul

Google Alert for the Soul | Network learning | Scoop.it
Peter Evans's insight:

An interesting but unconvincing argument presented here. The corrupting influence of consumerism on authenticity appears to be to be based on a 'straw man' argument accepting identity as individual. The corruption is due to the colonisation of self-actualisation by consumerism. Yet, arguably, the idea of an authentic individual (internal) identity has always been problematic.

Secondly, the argument that individual identity is being transformed by social media to a socialised and computationalised (and networked?) identity appears to rely on technological determinism. Social media has not made "Authenticity as fidelity to an autonomous, unified a priori self" untenable. It was always untenable as humans are inherently social animals. Furthermore, the idea that the quantified self is a way of locating an authentic self seems distinctly flawed and would benefit from a more critical analysis of the 'computational turn' in the social sciences. Ben Williamson's notion of the 'data doppleganger" seems more appropriate here (http://bit.ly/1lwXlIC)

 

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Opening Scotland - funding, if

Opening Scotland - funding, if | Network learning | Scoop.it
1. I get 'open', I really do...but why should I share anything when the enemy down the road gives fuck all? 2. I would, but that would mean asking other members of staff for their packs,... and the...
Peter Evans's insight:

An interesting post on the challenges of implementing openness in education in terms of the networks and discourses mobilised as barriers to 'spontaneous sharing'. The post is focused on open learning resources rather than open scholarship including research. A radical and spontaneous openness may generate a radical reform of education, a 'de-schooling' of tertiary 'education'. But the implications for existing institutions are not really addressed. If resources are open and available, are tertiary education institutions really the best places and spaces to use these resources? Could a plethora of alternative learning providers and alternative delivery models emerge (no bad thing) and if so, what might the purpose of educational institutions be in such an ecosystem?

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Beyond Prototypes | Enabling innovation in technology-enhanced learning

Beyond Prototypes | Enabling innovation in technology-enhanced learning | Network learning | Scoop.it

Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) research focuses on how technologies can add value to learning and teaching processes. Today’s learners have access to increasingly powerful and affordable handheld computing devices, including smartphones, games consoles and tablet computers. They can share, interact and immerse themselves online with others through the use of social networks and virtual worlds.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 25, 2013 11:02 AM

Free 48 page PDF ebook. Well worth downloading.

John Bostock's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:35 PM

I'm going to have to find time to read this as soon as possible!

A/Prof Jon Willis's curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:39 PM

For those interested in moving beyond the classroom/desktop nexus of teaching and learning.

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The Connected Learning Environment | EDUCAUSE.edu

The Connected Learning Environment | EDUCAUSE.edu | Network learning | Scoop.it

Abstract

Connected learning environments are changing education, student engagement, and college completion. While e-learning often connotes delivery of information in a sequential, linear fashion, the connected learning environment is integrative, personalized, interconnected, and authentic. Across higher education, leaders and learners are taking note of this evolution in education. With connected learning environments, everyone and everything is interconnected. The connections magnify the reach and value of not just information but also our relationships, creating opportunities for learning, working, and collaborating on an unprecedented scale. Information technology is about connections, which are fundamental to our institutions, our faculty, and our students. There is no single example of the connected learning environment; it takes various forms. This brief describes three hallmark characteristics of connected learning and provides several examples that illustrate each characteristic.


Via Jenny Pesina
Peter Evans's insight:

this is an interesting briefing on connected learning environments in higher education and states that: "While e-learning often connotes delivery of information in a sequential, linear fashion, the connected learning environment is integrative, personalized, interconnected, and authentic. Across higher education, leaders and learners are taking note of this evolution in education".

Such environments have the characteristics of (a) a seamless integration with student support services including careers services. This appears to emphasise a function to suporting the student in identifying their own curricula and linking their longer-term goals with module and programme learning outcomes and so may well be a rearticulation of attempts at common credit accumulationa and transfer schemes; (b) personalised learning helping students engage with the best learning opportunities through competency based education and (c) authentic learning experiences linking students to research academics, employers, communities etc. in addressing real world problems.

The briefing seems to buy in to the broader discourse of a need to transform or disrupt higher education by breaking down/ permeating institutional boundaries enabling students to study across different institutions and engage in learning through multiple stakeholders.

The briefing does include various examples of elements the connected learning environment being delivered by different institutions. 

 

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Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories? | Network learning | Scoop.it
This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory, zone of proximal development The area of capabilities that learners can exhibit with support from a teacher., Montessori constructivism, Lave & Wenger...

Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor
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Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 19, 2013 5:41 PM

Not really new ideas but a great graphic representation of learning theory.

Terry Price's curator insight, July 22, 2013 2:06 PM

Guide for learning.

 

LETP's curator insight, July 25, 2013 4:46 AM

A useful read for teachers to understand different learner capabilities. 

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More money for MOOCs: Coursera nabs $43M from diverse set of investors

More money for MOOCs: Coursera nabs $43M from diverse set of investors | Network learning | Scoop.it
Online education startup Coursera raises another $43 million with plans to build out mobile apps, open up its platform and deepen its international presence.

Via juandoming
Peter Evans's insight:

This seems to me to be a risky proposition given the diversity of providers emerging in America (North & South) and Europe as well as questions over the need for a specific platform in the first place - see cMOOCs - as well as the dependence on universities as the content providers. In essence, Coursera provides a learning management system that is very scaleable but pedagogically limited without bringing-in other platforms. A risky proposition at $60m plus investment perhaps for such a dependent USP. 

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Investigating MOOCs through blog mining | Yong Chen | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning

Investigating MOOCs through blog mining | Yong Chen | The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning | Network learning | Scoop.it

Abstract: MOOCs (massive open online course) is a disruptive innovation and a current buzzword in higher education. However, the discussion of MOOCs is disparate, fragmented, and distributed among different outlets. Systematic, extensively published research on MOOCs is unavailable. This paper adopts a novel method called blog mining to analyze MOOCs. The findings indicate, while MOOCs have benefitted learners, providers, and faculty who develop and teach MOOCs, challenges still exist, such as questionable course quality, high dropout rate, unavailable course credits, ineffective assessments, complex copyright, and limited hardware. Future research should explore the position of MOOCs and how it can be sustained.


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, May 2, 8:53 AM

The introduction to the article sometimes paints perhaps too simplistic a picture (such as that the xMOOCs and cMOOCs exhaust the universe of possible MOOCs; cf my recent scoop in early March: http://sco.lt/8FAEJl) or a somewhat trite one (“MOOCs represents an emerging methodology of online teaching and an important development in open education.”). Still the article is an interesting contribution to  MOOC research for the methodology it employs: text mining and analysis of blogs on MOOCs. Language technologies - in this case concept analysis and mapping using leximancer - are a powerful means to crunch large amounts of textual data, often revealing patters that are not immediately apparent to the naked eye. The value of the article therefore does not lie in its introduction, but in the results and ensuing discussion. 

 

Chen summarises the results under the headings of benefits for learners, benefits for providers, and trends, concluding with a discussion of the limitations of his study. His conclusions are not earth shattering, but how could they? After all, this is a mere summary of what he came across in the 360 blog posts he analysed with the help of leximancer; it is not a position paper in any sense, at best it is a kind of meta-analysis. To put it differently, tongue in cheek, there’s no need to go through the 431 scoops I collected on these pages to get an impression of what has been discussed about MOOCs in blogs over the last 4 odd years. Read the article and you have a fair idea. And then you should go to individual blog posts to collect opinions. @pbsloep

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Open Source Scholarship: GitHub for Academics - Next Steps

Open Source Scholarship: GitHub for Academics - Next Steps | Network learning | Scoop.it
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Open Education | Open Education Europa

Open Education | Open Education Europa | Network learning | Scoop.it
Peter Evans's insight:

A really interesting set of stats from the European Commission. In particular, the number of MOOCs from Spain is interetsing and I would wonder if this is partly due to domestic demand but also demand from Southern and Central America?

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21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates

21st Century Technology Skills Are a Core Competency for Today’s Graduates | Network learning | Scoop.it

Our students need to be comfortable with the information technologies that are inextricably linked to the 21st century skills the work place requires, and teachers need to help pave the way.


Via Nik Peachey
Peter Evans's insight:

I'd suggest a lot of the more innovative university programmes are already doing much of what is suggested here. One thing to emphasise is supporting students to use digital tools specifically for learning as they generally already know how to use these tools. In otherwords, while students may often be digitally competent, they are often less digitally literate in terms of learning processes. Also, what refer to PDAs - surely old tech?

more...
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:44 AM

Core foundations of 21 century learning.  

Jean-Claude Domenjoz's curator insight, November 15, 2013 1:19 AM

Liste des compétences:

http://www.imls.gov/about/21st_century_skills_list.aspx

 

VISUAL LITERACY

Demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate, and understand information presented through visible actions, objects and symbols, natural or man-made

 

Miep Carstensen's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:14 PM

Sound advice for teachers to incorprate these core competencies in their teaching programmes.

 

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Donald Clark Plan B: MOOCs – the flipped University?

Donald Clark Plan B: MOOCs – the flipped University? | Network learning | Scoop.it
Peter Evans's insight:

Donald Clark has given ten reasons why MOOCs flip higher education. While he makes some valid points, the post itself is overly influenced by the hype surrounding MOOCs and does not really provide a justification for how MOOCs address the problems he identifies in HE (deficiencies in pedagogy, some poor teaching and high costs). I particular: flip 2 suggests almost that MOOCs have been imposed on HE from outside rather than developed by HE; flip 4 from teaching to learning has been going on for a long time and certainly is embedded in the higher quality online (and face-to-face) programmes; flip 5 on assessments is pure conjecture as there are no actual MOOCs I'm aware of that provide for recognised credits (as in part of a national qualifications framework); flip 8 on criticism, yes some criticism is ridiculous but the credibility of MOOCs as learning has yet to be established, but the main criticism of monetisation is important (at least for the platform providers and VCs) and its hard to see how ROI can be established. Its the same for HEs but HEs may be involved for reasons other than as money-making opportunities (reputation enhancement, experimentation and innovation)
Fundamentally, the assumption that MOOCs have succeeded (and succeeded in what?) is not clear to me. Having said that, there are lots of good points here on online learning being as good or better than face-to-face, on the potential to drive greater responsiveness to demand for HE; being more learner-centric (and that's before looking at a feudal timetable of HE and the balance of teaching vs research in reward and recognition in the sector. All good and interesting stuff but lets engage with what we know about MOOCs rather than what we'd which about them.

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[publication] Learning Activities in Personal Learning Environment

Abstract:

Nowadays Learning Management Systems are an integrated part of educational institutions. Teachers as well as learners profit from the so-called Web 2.0 applications in their daily learning process. Communication and collaboration between students have been enhanced using mashups of Web 2.0 technologies. Smart mobile phones and the increased availability of free wireless network access points make the integration of all these tools in our personal daily life and personal learning process much easier than before. This publication focuses on the Personal Learning Environment (PLE) that was launched at Graz University of Technology (TU Graz) in 2010. It illustrates how the PLE at TU Graz has been extended to move towards mobile PLE. Furthermore the learning activities of about more than 4000 learners in the last two years are revealed based on the tracked user behavior. The activities and usage traces are modeled using domain specific semantic ontologies. The models are used as the input for our Analytics Dashboard to visualize statistics and get a quick overview of learning habits and overall reflection usages and activity dynamics in the PLE.

 

Reference:Taraghi, B., Softic, S., Ebner, M. & De Vocht, L. (2013). Learning Activities in Personal Learning Environment. In Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2013 (pp. 2466-2475). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.


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Education 3.0 and the Pedagogy (Andragogy, Heutagogy) of Mobile Learning

Education 3.0 and the Pedagogy (Andragogy, Heutagogy) of Mobile Learning | Network learning | Scoop.it

"The evolution of the web from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 and now to Web 3.0 can be used a metaphor of how education should also be evolving, as a movement based on the evolution from Education 1.0 to Education 3.0."


Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor
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Peter Evans's comment, July 19, 2013 2:28 PM
A useful summary table although I'd emphasise that the different 'versions' of education all have their place - v2.0 does not supercede v1.0
Elke Watson's comment, July 19, 2013 4:49 PM
Thank you. I'm not quite ready myself to do away with teaching professionals or brick and mortal education. I value learning in a group context. I found the second summary table more useful (pedagogy, andragogy, heutagogy)
Veronica Hoyos's curator insight, March 13, 9:22 PM

We could talk of the evolution from Education 2.0 to education 3.0 after carrying an evaluation on the impact of the Web 2.0 in education

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Free Guide: Brand-led learning | Elearning Reports

Free Guide: Brand-led learning | Elearning Reports | Network learning | Scoop.it
Kineo Brand-led learning white white paper (5 Steps for Great Brand-led E-learning: http://t.co/pw9TRSw9hF http://t.co/YwIAS6xFi2)...
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