Net Neutrality
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Net Neutrality
All about recent FCC ruling on net neutrality—overview on the ruling, and what the implications could be for businesses and consumers.
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Netflix’s secret weapon in the net neutrality fight

Netflix’s secret weapon in the net neutrality fight | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
The streaming video giant begins to flex its considerable muscle.
Jessica Donlon's insight:
In a letter to investors, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and CFO David Wells warned that if broadband providers start charging a toll for reaching U.S. Internet subscribers, Netflix and its users would revolt. "Were this draconian scenario to unfold with some ISP [Internet service provider], we would vigorously protest and encourage our members to demand the open Internet they are paying their ISP to deliver," Hastings and Wells wrote. That doesn't appear to be an empty threat; in the same letter Wednesday, Netflix announced its paying customer base had grown to more than 34 million Americans, a 23-percent increase compared with the same period last year. Netflix currently accounts for nearly a third of all U.S. Internet traffic during peak hours, according to third-party studies.
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Did the Government Just Break the Internet?

Did the Government Just Break the Internet? | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
Ten years ago, the Federal Communications Commission wandered away from 100 years of communications history, labeling high-speed Internet access services as “unregulated.” Theoretically, competition would take the place of any regulation.
Jessica Donlon's insight:

"My only choice for high-speed Internet access in Cambridge is Comcast. And the same is true for more than 77 percent of Americans: The local cable monopoly is the only seller of wired high-speed, high-capacity Internet access."

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Voices for Internet Freedom Calls on the FCC to Take Immediate Action to Protect the Open Internet

Voices for Internet Freedom Calls on the FCC to Take Immediate Action to Protect the Open Internet | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, a federal court struck down the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Order. The ruling means that companies like AT&T and Verizon can censor, block and interfere with Internet traffic and content.
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What you need to know about the court decision that just struck down net neutrality

What you need to know about the court decision that just struck down net neutrality | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, an appeals court in Washington, D.C. struck down the FCC’s rules regarding net neutrality, which are designed to prevent ISPs from giving preferential treatment to certain kinds of data.
Jessica Donlon's insight:

From GigaOm: This decision — if it remains unchallenged — raises the possibility that large internet service providers could charge certain companies extra for delivering their content to subscribers, and give preference to the content coming from those who are willing pay them a fee, or have cut some other kind of deal. In effect, the democratized nature of the internet would be replaced by a feudal system in which the ability to reach a consumer would be auctioned off to the highest bidder. As a Bloomberg article described it:

 

“Proponents, including Web companies, say regulations are needed to keep Internet-service providers from interfering with rival video and other services. Those companies don’t pay today for what’s known as last-mile Web content delivery. The FCC has said that without rules, Internet providers could favor wealthier, established players at the expense of startups, squelching innovation.”

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What's Net Neutrality? What Happened to Net Neutrality Yesterday? What Happens Next? A Q&A for the Rest of Us.

What's Net Neutrality? What Happened to Net Neutrality Yesterday? What Happens Next? A Q&A for the Rest of Us. | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
This stuff sounds complicated. Law professor Susan Crawford helps us out.
Jessica Donlon's insight:

via recode: Insights from Susan Crawford, a law professor with an intense interest in the subject and the ability to help the rest of us make sense of it.


Define Net Neutrality: "The basic idea is that the companies that are selling Internet access to Americans are not supposed to choose winner or losers — to decide which applications or services will be more successful in reaching subscribers."


The Issues: 


So the carriers are on one side of this battle. Who’s taking them on?

The problem is, our major Internet companies have interests that are aligned with the carriers. They’re like ESPN. You can think of Facebook and Google and the other guys as really like major cable channels. It’s not in their interest to be particularly loud about this.

 

Who’s on the other side is going to be [some of] Silicon Valley, investors, venture capitalists, some civil society actors. And the principle of the idea is that the speech of 300 million Americans is more important than the profit-making activities of four or five companies.

 

Why don’t the Googles and Facebooks of the world want to fight the telcos?

Again — it’s like ESPN. Facebook and Google are powerful enough that the providers need them more than they need the cable guys. So they know they’ll be able to make all the deals they want. They’re not so worried about the fate of the next Google, or the next Facebook.

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AT&T Says Its Sponsored Data Program Does Not Violate FCC Net Neutrality Rules | Droid Life

AT&T Says Its Sponsored Data Program Does Not Violate FCC Net Neutrality Rules | Droid Life | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
Jessica Donlon's insight:

Days before the FCC ruling. 

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Technology Briefing | Telecommunications: F.C.C. Rules On Cable Access - New York Times

The Federal Communications Commission exempted cable Internet companies from laws that force telecommunications providers to open their lines to competition, saying the decision was necessary to
Jessica Donlon's insight:

From March, 2012. 

 

"... Communications Commission exempted cable Internet companies from laws that force telecommunications providers to open their lines to competition, saying the decision was necessary to ignite more investment in high-speed Internet services. Unlike telephone companies, cable companies are required to share their lines only when specifically told to by the government."

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Why FCC's 'Internet Neutrality' Ruling Should Concern You

Why FCC's 'Internet Neutrality' Ruling Should Concern You | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
  A federal appeals court in Washington ruled that the Federal Communications Commission does not have the right to block certain sites on Tuesday. Carriers, such as Verizon, however, can make traf...
Jessica Donlon's insight:

"... ramifications of the ruling can be very devastating, especially for minority media business owners."

 

Kristal High of Politic 365 believes that the ruling will bring forth innovation from new carriers to bring more options in the way we receive our Internet. “When you start talking about how we share this space, it’s not one [discussion] about the big guys or the little guys, it really is a complete ecosystem we’re talking about, and I think there’s opportunities and upside for new entrance after this decision then there was before.

 

“If you put aside this notion that traffic is going to be slowed down and prioritized,” she said, “[because] that’s not on the table right now, frankly, if anyone were to try that, the FCC is right there to check that behavior.”

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Net Neutrality Ruling a Blow to Web Startups

Net Neutrality Ruling a Blow to Web Startups | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
A D.C. appeals court struck down FCC rules on Internet traffic, which could cost businesses that need fast content delivery.
Jessica Donlon's insight:

Michael Beckerman, the president and CEO of The Internet Association, a Washington, D.C.-based trade group for Internet businesses, says the ruling may have damaging effects on content companies.

 

"You don’t want to ever get into a place where an ISP or anybody else has control over who can get to individual Internet users or where users can go," Beckerman tells Inc. "And that's the whole point of why these rules were put in place."

 

Beckerman declined to predict whether the FCC would try to write new rules or how his organization and the companies it represents--which include Airbnb, Gilt Groupe, and Lyft, as well as larger businesses such as AOL and Amazon--might respond to the decision in the near future.

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Marc Andreessen talks about the pros and cons of net neutrality and ...

Marc Andreessen talks about the pros and cons of net neutrality and ... | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
During a Twitter discussion about the recent court decision striking down net neutrality, entrepreneur-turned-VC Marc Andreessen talked about the need for massive investment in new network technologies and how to ...
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Welcome To The Net Neutrality Nightmare Scenario

Welcome To The Net Neutrality Nightmare Scenario | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
Net neutrality advocates just lost their biggest battle yet. Welcome to "Internet 3.0."
Jessica Donlon's insight:

Important topic. 

 

“This ruling means there is no one who can protect us from ISPs that block or discriminate against websites, applications or services,” says a statement from the organization. Tell the FCC to start treating broadband like a communications service, and to restore its Net Neutrality rules.”


Implications in simple terms: "Carriers, such as Comcast, could charge different amounts for access to different tiers of the internet. The basic tier might include email and basic browsing; the next could include Facebook and Twitter; the final tier could include Netflix, YouTube, or Spotify. These tiers would be divided not by bandwidth or speed requirements, but by content type. The internet would become a club with various VIP sections, arbitrarily laid out to benefit internet providers."

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Open Internet | FCC.gov

Open Internet | FCC.gov | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
Jessica Donlon's insight:

Straight from FCC.gov: "The 'Open Internet' is the internet as we know it."

 

"The FCC has adopted three basic open Internet rules:

Transparency. Broadband providers must disclose information regarding their network management practices, performance, and the commercial terms of their broadband services.No blocking. Fixed broadband providers (such as DSL, cable modem, or fixed wireless providers) may not block lawful content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices. Mobile broadband providers may not block lawful websites, or applications that compete with their voice or video telephony services.No unreasonable discrimination. Fixed broadband providers may not unreasonably discriminate in transmitting lawful network traffic over a consumer’s broadband Internet access service. Unreasonable discrimination of network traffic could take the form of particular services or websites appearing slower or degraded in quality."

 

Article includes: 

Open Internet RulesThe History of the Open Internet ProceedingEmergency Considerations and Safety and Security AuthoritiesFiling a ComplaintConsumer GuideWorkshops and Speeches ArchiveArchive of OpenInternet.govl
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Why You Should Be Freaking Out About The End Of Net Neutrality

Why You Should Be Freaking Out About The End Of Net Neutrality | Net Neutrality | Scoop.it
Net neutrality is dead.
Jessica Donlon's insight:

Huffington Post's take, by Betsy Isaacson

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