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Together against hunger in Africa

By Brenda Zulu in Tunis

With more than one in five people estimated to be undernourished, Africa remains the region with the highest prevalence of undernourishment in the world says  José Graziano da Silva, FAO Director-General.

 

Speaking in a Press Release, Da Silver says  Africa was far too big to be a single story.

 

"Africa has seen success in the fight against hunger and in increasing food production, but is still faced with significant food security challenges. The success stories range from rolling out of improved banana varieties in central Africa to the introduction of high-yielding varieties of maize in east and southern Africa," he said.

 

He observed that productivity gains in cassava in western Africa have been immense, while cotton production in the Sahel region has been impressive. East Africa has stamped its authority on tea and floriculture production and is now the preferred choice of major markets in the world.

 

He said the recurrent food security crises in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel were stark evidence of the need to build resilience in the region and to cope with recurrent droughts that become more frequent and extreme with climate change.

 

"The combined effects of drought, high food prices, conflict, displacement and chronic poverty has caused untold suffering to millions across the continent. Africa has the possibility to change this and build on its success stories to advance food security and sustainable development in the region," said Da Silver.

 

The launch of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Plan (CAADP) in 2003 has helped spur food production and food security. African governments have shown their commitment to achieve food security, identifying their individual pathways under this regional framework. Experience has shown us that countries that have seen greater progress are those that managed to allocate at least 10 percent of their national budget to the agricultural sector in line with the Maputo Declaration and implemented CAADP compacts. As of today, nearly 20 African countries have already achieved, or are on track to achieve, the first Millennium Development Goal of halving the prevalence of hunger by 2015.

 

He noted that halving hunger was an important step, but still a step towards the true goal of ending hunger. Africa was moving in the right direction. In the African Union Summit last January, its leaders endorsed a proposal to establish a 2025 zero hunger target for the region.

 

This goal was set to be formally adopted at the next AU Summit later this year and is a powerful sign of commitment to the future we want. So far, forty countries have signed CAADP Compacts and 28 countries have developed National Agriculture Investment Plans, the challenge is implementing them.

 

Da Silver said insufficient investment in agriculture and social protection were still bottlenecks for increasing food production and reduction hunger.

 

"It is thus up to national governments, in partnership with the international community, the private sector and farmers’ organizations to create the conditions for sustainable rural development. We need innovative types of financing arrangements, diverse forms of public-private partnerships and new ways of South-South cooperation that clearly put food security and the needs of poor, small-scale farmers and pastoralists center-stage," he said.

 

The Africa Solidarity Trust Fund is one such example of innovative financing. Officially established in 2013, the fund provides a mechanism through which higher-income African countries can help strengthen food security across the continent by assisting countries and their regional organizations in their efforts to eradicate hunger and malnutrition, eliminate rural poverty and sustainably manage natural resources. This is not only a sign of solidarity but also of understanding that in today’s world, we cannot reach food security in one individual country.

 

Da Silver added that the ongoing efforts should help Africa tap into its full economic potential and make the growth it is experiencing more inclusive. There are two keys to make this happen: youth and agriculture. And they will be at the center of the agenda of the FAO African Regional Conference that takes place from 24 to 28 March 2014 in Tunisia.

 

Today, more than half of the African population is under 25 years old. This makes it the youngest region in the world. Approximately 11 million young Africans will join the labour market every year for the next decade. Creating decent employment opportunities for this young labour force – in a transformed, dynamic and vibrant agricultural sector - will be crucial if Africa is to reap this demographic dividend. 2014 is a good year to raise awareness of the importance of agriculture and youth for inclusive, sustainable development in Africa.

 

The United Nations has declared 2014 as the International Year of Family Farming and the African Union also celebrates its year for Agriculture and Food Security.

 

"Let’s seize this opportunity to focus our attention, our policies and our advocacy in promoting agriculture and the farmers, fishers, pastoralists, forest collectors and traditional and indigenous communities that contribute so much for food security while, many times, receiving so little support," said Da Silver.

 

Africa has the economic, natural and human resources it needs to promote food security and sustainability in the continent. With political will, comprehensive programs bridging agricultural production and social protection, adequate funding, and by tapping into the potential of its youth, we can get there. We are in this together.

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Strengthening ties with private sector in Japan

The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) has called for “intelligent partnerships" with Japan’s private sector that will be anchored on the principle of mutual benefit.

 

Chief Executive Officer of NEPAD Dr Ibrahim Mayaki was speaking at the inaugural Japan-Africa Business Forum took place in Tokyo this week. The Forum was jointly organised by the African Diplomatic Corps, the African Development Bank, the Nikkei Business Planning and Editorial Centre and the Government of Japan.

 

The Forum which took place on June 10 and 11 brought together the private sector from African countries and Japan. Its aim is to encourage collaboration on various development priorities in Africa.

 

Dr Ibrahim Mayaki cautioned that while there continues to be a lot of satisfaction over registered economic growth in Africa, leaders are cautious not to become too excited by these impressive growth rates.

 

While in Japan, Dr Mayaki and Senior Vice President of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Mr Hideaki Domichi signed a Memorandum of Understanding, to strengthen cooperation in infrastructure and agriculture development. Priority areas of cooperation will focus on the implementation and monitoring of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA), in particular project preparation and evaluation.

 

PIDA is a strategic framework for the development of regional and continental infrastructure in the sectors of Energy, Transport, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Trans-boundary Water, so as to better connect and integrate the continent.

 

NEPAD and Japan will work together on capacity development for the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) and joint cooperation on JICA’s initiatives in agriculture, such as the Coalition for Africa Rice Development (CARD), within the CAADPframework.

 

CARD is a consultative group of bilateral donors and international organisations working in collaboration with rice-producing African countries. Its goal is to support the efforts of African countries to double rice production on the continent to 28 million tons per annum by 2018.

 

Institutional support and strengthened coordination between JICA and the NEPAD through cooperation such as dispatching JICA experts to NEPAD Agency was also discussed.

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NEPAD to roll out projects worth billions -

NEPAD to roll out projects worth billions - | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The New Partnership for Africa’s’ Development (NEPAD) says projectsaligned in the next ten years will not only ensure a dynamic and robust agricultural sector but also  contributes to growth and reduction of food insecurity in Africa. Speaking in an interview over the week, the head of Nepad Martin Bwalya, said the agency has projects in […
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Ghana News - Invest in irrigation systems- Vegetable Producers appeal to gov't

Ghana News - Invest in irrigation systems- Vegetable Producers appeal to gov't | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The Administrative Manager for Vegetable Producers and Exporters Association of Ghana (VEPEAG) Victor Flow-Mensah says the only way to boost vegetable production in Ghana is to invest more in small scale irrigation systems.
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Gladson Makowa's curator insight, June 9, 5:06 AM

In the first place we need vegetables exporters or an organisation of that nature in Malawi. Our vegetables are eaten locally. As a result we have circles of season of plenty when there is oversupply of vegetables and farmers become dis appointed. Following farmers disappointment comes the season of low supply of vegetables when the prices go up. Farmers are not willing to spend much on irrigation in seasons when which needs a lot of inputs because of uncertainties of markets. To prove this grow your on Tomato and see how you suffer from  blood pressure when they are getting ripe and you have no markets. 

 

Thanks to the new tomato varieties that have longer shelf life. 

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Ghana News - Japanese government approves grant for Ghanaian farmers

Ghana News - Japanese government approves grant for Ghanaian farmers | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The Japanese government has approved a grant that will provide farmers with agricultural machinery and materials.
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Ghana News - African Fisheries Ministers meet in Addis Ababa

Ghana News - African Fisheries Ministers meet in Addis Ababa | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
African Ministers in charge of Fisheries and Aquaculture yesterday gathered at the African Union Commission offices for the second edition of the Conference of African Ministers of Fisheries and Aquaculture.
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The Zambian Analyst: Spending On Agriculture up 7% After CAADP Launch

The Zambian Analyst: Spending On Agriculture up 7% After CAADP Launch | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
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Africa on the way to realising 4.4pc growth in agriculture

Africa on the way to realising 4.4pc growth in agriculture | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
By Judith Akolo

Africa is on the way to realising the 4.4 per cent growth in Agriculture per annum as envisaged in the formation of the Comprehensi
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African agro-finance up 7%

African agro-finance up 7% | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
By DOREEN NAWATHE African Union (AU) says public spending on agriculture in Africa has risen by over seven percent.African Union commissioner for rura...
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Africans who suffer from Hunger belong to humanity- FAO

Africans who suffer from Hunger belong to humanity- FAO | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

By Brenda Zulu in TUNISIA

 

“The millions of Africans that suffer from hunger do not belong only to Africa but to humanity,” said Jośe Graziano da Silvia, Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Director.

 

Speaking at the opening of the FAO Africa Regional Conference for Africa, Da Silva said Africa has many challenges to overcome in order to reduce hunger by 2025 after having endorsed the zero hunger target for Africa.

 

He outlined reasons for food insecurity to include protracted crisis and insufficient funds to invest in agriculture and water scarcity in the horn of Africa and North Africa.

 

“Conflict remained another challenge and that it could have a huge impact on food security,” said Da Silva.

 

He committed FAO’s support to the Central African Republic and South Sudan in these difficult moments.

 

Da Silver noted that in this year of agriculture and Food security and also a year of family farming it was an opportunity to further advance in the direction of the future people want for Africa.

 

He called on African countries to use this opportunity to put small scale farmers, fishers, pastoralists, forests collectors and traditional and indigenous communities at the center of our agenda.

 

He noted that around 60 developing countries have already reached the MDG hunger target of which 16 of those countries are from Africa.

 

“They include Angola, Benin, Cameroun, Egypt, Ghana, Djibouti, Libya, Malawi, Niger, Nigeria, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa , Togo and Tunisia,” he said.

 

His Excellence Mr Mehdi Jomaa, Prime Minister of Tunisia has officially opened the 28th FAO Africa regional Conference that has been taking place in Tunis from 24 to 28 March 2014.

 

Speaking at the event, Mr Jomaa hailed FAO for its efforts to help Africa end hunger.

 

He said Youths were a pillar of the society and that Tunisia had adopted some incentives for young people to modernize farming.

 

In Tunisia they have allowed young people to acquire land of favorable land credits. They are also helping engineers and young enterprenuers to rent land that belong the state.

 

“This is the area where young people can be supported. In Tunisia, we have small holdings which practice family farming in production of food. They have created livelihoods,” explained Mr Jomaa.

 

He said the government was helping them to access finance to develop their small holdings and also access to markets.

 

He noted that the contributions to the Africa Solidarity Fund will help Africa to deal with different problems to it’s agriculture. 

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Nepad: Low funding is undermining agricultural productivity - YouTube

Nepad Chief Executive Officer Dr. Ibrahim Assane Mayaki says low funding of the agriculture sector is undermining efforts aimed at increasing agricultural pr...
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Raise incentives for youths in Aquaculture and Livestock - FAO

Raise incentives for youths in Aquaculture and Livestock - FAO | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

 

By Brenda Zulu in Tunisia

 

There is need to raise the incentives for the youth to engage in rural activities, in farming especially in livestock production, fisheries and aquaculture which are more attractive to the youth because of the quicker results.

 

“We cannot speak of a sustainable and inclusive growth for Africa without speaking of youth and agriculture,” said José Graziano da Silva, FAO Director General.

 

He said this at the opening of the side event on youth and the development of aquaculture and livestock at the 28th FAO Regional Conference for Africa in Tunis, Tunisia, from 24 to 28March 2014.  He noted that sustainable and inclusive growth had become more important as they were seeing more of Africa’s youth searching for opportunities elsewhere.

 

“Many times, they are forced to do so because of conflict or lack of alternatives at home. We need to give the youth other possibilities. The aquaculture and livestock sectors can provide them employment,” he said.

 

The aquaculture sector in Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia grew six times between 2000-2010. A more productive and profitable aquaculture can create significant income and employment opportunities.

 

In Nigeria, the largest aquaculture producer in Sub-Saharan Africa, a hectare of catfish farm generates US$ 7,018 in labour incomes and creates 7 jobs.

 

Da Silva noted that livestock also has a potential that FAO have not fully tapped into yet.  He said worldwide, the sector accounts for 40% of the value of world agricultural production.

 

“Its importance is expected to grow as demand for animal protein continues to grow in the world and in Africa. This offers opportunities for young Africans, men and women, not only in production but also in adding value along the food chain,” explained Da Silver.

In Kenya, the dairy sector creates around 900,000 jobs, many of which are done by young men and women.

 

FAO needs to create the right environment and conditions so that young people can invest and find productive and gainful employment in the livestock sector. FAO and other partners already work with governments to support the development of these opportunities in local communities.

Over the last few years, FAO has supported the development of National Aquaculture Strategies in 14 sub-Saharan African countries.

 

Through the NEPAD-FAO Fish Programme (NFFP), we have also assisted in the development of market-oriented “model” clusters groups in Kenya, Nigeria and Zambia.

 

Over half of the African population is expected to remain rural until the middle of this century. Agriculture, and that includes the livestock, fisheries and aquaculture sectors, is its main source of employment.

Africa is not only one of the fastest growing regions in the world, it is also the youngest one. Over half its population is under 25 years old and in the next decade, 11 million people are expected to enter its labour market every year.

 

Da Silva added that at the same time, their livestock and rural employment experts are joining forces in a recently launched pilot project in Ethiopia, which seeks to specifically support youth in the country’s booming small ruminant sector.

 

In Zimbabwe, a country where over 60% of the population is under 25 years old, FAO and partners have started implementing a 7.7 million Euros project to support the smallholder livestock sector.

 

Da Silva observed that the agricultural sector needs the youth to inject a new energy into agriculture, livestock and fisheries.  He said the sector needs the youth to adopt the technologies and innovations that will allow it to keep growing.

 

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Journalists pose with Jose Graziano da Silva at the 28th conference

Journalists pose with Jose Graziano da Silva  at the 28th conference | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

José Graziano da Silva(C) poses with FAO invited journalists at a 28th FAO conference on March 26, 2014 in Tunis. FAO held from March 24 to 28 its 28th conference in Tunis. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) holds from 24 to 28 March in Tunis, its 28th conference under the theme 'African youth in agriculture and sustainable development'

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Aflatoxin fungus in crops costs Africa $450m annually - PACA

By Chris Kakunta


PARTNERSHIP for Aflatoxin Control in Africa says the continent loses over US$450 million annually due to the presence of aflatoxin in most crops traded on the international market.


Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by two species of Aspergillus, a fungus which is especially found in areas with hot and humid climates. Since aflatoxins are known to be genotoxic and carcinogenic, exposure through food should be kept as low as possible.


Aflatoxins can occur in foods such as groundnuts, treenuts, maize, rice, figs and other dried foods, spices and crude vegetable oils, and cocoa beans, as a result of fungal contamination before and after harvest.
PACA programme manager Amare Ayalew said aflatoxins, which occur naturally through fungal metabolisms, attack diverse foods such as maize and peanuts.


He said aflatoxin was also a major cause of liver cancer and stunted growth in children.


Dr Ayalew said aflatoxins had proved to be a major barrier in linking African farmers to international markets as they prevented commodities from meeting international agricultural trade and food safety standards.
He was speaking on the sidelines of the ongoing Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme Partnership Platform (CAADP) meeting in Durban, South Africa.


Dr Ayalew added that PACA therefore aimed at supporting agricultural development, safeguarding consumer health and to facilitate trade by catalyzing, coordinating and increasing effective aflatoxin control along agricultural value chains in Africa.


PACA was established at the 7th CAADP meeting to mainstream sanitary and photosanitary matters through an Africa-led partnership for aflatoxin control.


Speaking at the same function, PACA programmes officer Wezi Chunga-Sambo said the organisation was developing a database on aflatoxin which would help African countries control the substance through a regional approach because the issue hinged on food security, trade and health.

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Innovation School feeding Programme to Combat Extreme Poverty in Zanzibar

Innovation School feeding Programme to Combat Extreme Poverty in Zanzibar | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
By Kulthum Ally Recently the Government of Zanzibar are launched a new innovation Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) programme in collaboration with the Partnership for Child Development (PCD) and Ta...
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Namibia: Regional Seminar On Implementing Agricultural Investment Plans Using the Value Chain Approach (Page 1 of 3)

Namibia: Regional Seminar On Implementing Agricultural Investment Plans Using the Value Chain Approach (Page 1 of 3) | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The NEPAD Agency organised a training seminar with the theme "Implementing NAIPs using a value chain approach" in Pretoria, South Africa, from 05 to 09 May 2014. The seminar was hosted with the support of the CAADP-GIZ programme. Wallie Roux as the NAU's nominee for Namibia's CAADP Country Team attended the seminar. His participation was made possible by GIZ Namibia.
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Ghana News - Government allocates rice production targets to regions

Ghana News - Government allocates rice production targets to regions | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Government has allocated rice production targets to all regions in the country to become self-sufficient by 2017.
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Ghana News - €600,000 temperature controlled trucks left to rot at Agric Ministry

Ghana News - €600,000 temperature controlled trucks left to rot at Agric Ministry | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Two brand new temperature controlled trucks acquired by the Government with a loan from the African Development Bank have been rotting away in the scorching sun for four years now.
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AUC hosts Ministerial breakfast meeting to discuss CAADP implementation and the case of Rwanda as a CAADP success story | African Union

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The Zambian Analyst: EU Gives Africa US$126m For Fisheries

The Zambian Analyst: EU Gives Africa US$126m For Fisheries | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Brenda Nglazi Zulu's insight:
Good work Paul Shalala
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Livestock contribution to CAADP to be augmented

COMMON MARKET FOR EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA (COMESA)
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Small holder farmers in Africa invest $100 billion in farming

By Brenda Zulu

While billions of money are pledged by the G8 and G20 fora, the African investors are farmers and among them are small holder farmers who invest about $100 billion every year in their farms, despite lack of credit facilities.

Despite significant growth, Africa still faces major challenges of food and nutrition insecurity, youth and women unemployment especially in the rural areas.

Speaking on the 28TH Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Conference held in Tunisia, 24 to 28th March 2014, Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki CEO of NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency said the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development programme (CAADP) would contribute to addressing the challenges as it is an agenda for transformation.

"CAADP has established it self as a brand throughout out Africa and the rest of the world," said Dr Mayaki.

He said the main success of CAADP was fostering political alignment which was a major shift made in the approach to development aid.

He outlined CAADP risks as being able to ensure to respond to hopes raised by a country and the Regional Economic Commission (REC)  level and affirm the impact of CAADP by ascertaining whether or not the process has contributed to an increase in food production and resource mobilization.

Dr Mayaki  called on African leaders to recognise the need to mobilize domestic resources for agriculture.

"Since 2003, only 13 countries  have met or surpassed the CAADP target in or more years. The increase in public expenditure is the same as in other sectors," observed Dr Mayaki.

Overall in Africa, agriculture budgetary allocation is around 4 % which is far below the 10% Maputo declaration even through some other countries have made an effort.

Given the low overalls of national budgets, there is no doubt that African governments still rely on external financing for agriculture development which is not sustainable and desirable.

Dr Mayaki said CAADP faced a risk as there was bureaucratization within the programme  of which a focus on investments in practice led to creating dependency with regard to donor funding strategy.

"Some stakeholders say that CAADP does not speak  to their problems," said Dr Mayaki.

The other risk was for  African leaders to be diverted from the CAADP commitment to that which may not reflect Africa's agenda.  The concern for NEPAD was to ensure that investor interests converged with those of the main stakeholders. Agriculture producer organisations should therefore put their opinions forward and engage in a dialogue with other private sector.

Dr Mayaki further advises African governments to capitalise on achievements so far to enhance impact in CAADP plans and increase in productivity.

Governments should reaffirm it's leadership by articulating actions with continental and regional organisations, improve partnership with farmers and private sector and also mobilize domestics resources.

To sustain the CAADP momentum, African countries should upgrade their food security and food sovereignty strategy by being progressive in integration at world markets and get involved in international negotiations.

There is also need to refocus public intervention on market failures and promote risk coverage and provision of public goods with considerations for environmental and nutrition policies.

"I would like to reiterate the necessity of ensuring that Nutrition is mainstreamed in all our inventions and the ZERO Hunger initiative will contribute to it," said Dr Mayaki.

He also called on the promotion is safety nets for the poor, women's rights and the improvement of local governance on water and land while promoting access to sustainable and renewable energy.

He added that Africa should promote and prioritize sustainable farming systems that were labour intensive and environmental friends to support family smallholders.

The African Union (AU) is this year celebrating 10 years of CAADP, year of agriculture and the UN  year of family farming.By Brenda Zulu

While billions of money are pledged by the G8 and G20 fora, the African investors are farmers and among them are small holder farmers who invest about $100 billion every year in their farms, despite lack of credit facilities.

Despite significant growth, Africa still faces major challenges of food and nutrition insecurity, youth and women unemployment especially in the rural areas.

Speaking on the 28TH Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Conference held in Tunisia, 24 to 28th March 2014, Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki CEO of NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency said the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development programme (CAADP) would contribute to addressing the challenges as it is an agenda for transformation.

"CAADP has established it self as a brand throughout out Africa and the rest of the world," said Dr Mayaki.

He said the main success of CAADP was fostering political alignment which was a major shift made in the approach to development aid.

He outlined CAADP risks as being able to ensure to respond to hopes raised by a country and the Regional Economic Commission (REC)  level and affirm the impact of CAADP by ascertaining whether or not the process has contributed to an increase in food production and resource mobilization.

Dr Mayaki  called on African leaders to recognise the need to mobilize domestic resources for agriculture.

"Since 2003, only 13 countries  have met or surpassed the CAADP target in or more years. The increase in public expenditure is the same as in other sectors," observed Dr Mayaki.

Overall in Africa, agriculture budgetary allocation is around 4 % which is far below the 10% Maputo declaration even through some other countries have made an effort.

Given the low overalls of national budgets, there is no doubt that African governments still rely on external financing for agriculture development which is not sustainable and desirable.

Dr Mayaki said CAADP faced a risk as there was bureaucratization within the programme  of which a focus on investments in practice led to creating dependency with regard to donor funding strategy.

"Some stakeholders say that CAADP does not speak  to their problems," said Dr Mayaki.

The other risk was for  African leaders to be diverted from the CAADP commitment to that which may not reflect Africa's agenda.  The concern for NEPAD was to ensure that investor interests converged with those of the main stakeholders. Agriculture producer organisations should therefore put their opinions forward and engage in a dialogue with other private sector.

Dr Mayaki further advises African governments to capitalise on achievements so far to enhance impact in CAADP plans and increase in productivity.

Governments should reaffirm it's leadership by articulating actions with continental and regional organisations, improve partnership with farmers and private sector and also mobilize domestics resources.

To sustain the CAADP momentum, African countries should upgrade their food security and food sovereignty strategy by being progressive in integration at world markets and get involved in international negotiations.

There is also need to refocus public intervention on market failures and promote risk coverage and provision of public goods with considerations for environmental and nutrition policies.

"I would like to reiterate the necessity of ensuring that Nutrition is mainstreamed in all our inventions and the ZERO Hunger initiative will contribute to it," said Dr Mayaki.

He also called on the promotion is safety nets for the poor, women's rights and the improvement of local governance on water and land while promoting access to sustainable and renewable energy.

He added that Africa should promote and prioritize sustainable farming systems that were labour intensive and environmental friends to support family smallholders.

The African Union (AU) is this year celebrating 10 years of CAADP, year of agriculture and the UN  year of family farming.

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Pascal Corbé's curator insight, April 25, 1:57 PM

The relation to Rural Futures will have to be looked at for a more comprehensive approach to rural development in Africa.

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FAO - News Article: Africa’s youth key to strengthening agricultural economy

FAO - News Article: Africa’s youth key to strengthening agricultural economy | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
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José Graziano da Silva FAO-DG (R) meets NEPAD Assane Mayaki (CEO)

José Graziano da Silva FAO-DG (R) meets NEPAD Assane Mayaki (CEO) | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

José Graziano da Silva(R) meets NEPAD Assane Mayaki (CEO) at a 28th FAO conference on March 26, 2014 in Tunis. FAO held from March 24 to 28 its 28th conference in Tunis. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) holds from 24 to 28 March in Tunis, its 28th conference under the theme 'African youth in agriculture and sustainable development'

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Nepad, AU develop fisheries policy -

Nepad, AU develop fisheries policy - | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Policies aimed at regulating fishing capacity are critical for maintaining production and supply of fish products despite policy makers putting little focus on the role of fisheries and aquaculture to the national economic development. This is contained in a draft report which was presented on the sidelines of the just-ended Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme […
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Agriculture to be at the Centre of economic and polical stability in Africa

By Chris Kakunta

 

The 10th CAADPP officially opened last week in Durban, South Africa; with the African Union Chairperson NKOSAZANA DLAMINI-ZUMA emphasising that Agriculture is and will continue to be at the centre of economic and political stability in Africa.

 

Ms. DLAMINI-ZUMA said in order to overcome most of the conflicts in Africa, there must be deliberate efforts to invest in agriculture because the continent’s greatest potential and comparative advantage is in agricultural based industrialisation.

 

She said 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the African Union, a year the AU is commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP).

She said: “It is remarkable that we commemorate the year of Agriculture and food security themed, “Transforming Africa’s Agriculture for shared prosperity and improved livelihoods through harnessing opportunities for inclusive growth and sustainable development.”

 

Dr. DLAMINI-ZUMA noted that most African countries agriculture constitutes the development battlefield where the fight against poverty, hunger and indignity can be won, adding that the agenda for agricultural transformation is strategically positioned to provide enormous opportunities for inclusive and sustainable development.

And Forum for Agriculture Research in Africa (FARA), Chairperson Dr. Jean Ping there was need to incorporate science and technology in the transformation of African Agriculture.

 

“No society has transformed its social or economy without leveraging the power of science and technology and if you want development to be sustained, you need science,” observed Jean Ping.

 

Dr. PING said there was need for Africa to invest in Research and Development (R&D) and to have a human resource base with adequate skills to manage the development process.

Meanwhile, Pan African Farmers Organisation (PAFO) Stephen Muchiri said transformed African agriculture should result into transformed producers or farmers who will treat agriculture as a business.

 

Mr. Muchiri said we cannot transform Africa agriculture if the majority producers remain poor and struggling for their livelihoods.

He said in transformed agriculture, there are incentives for all actors in a given value chain including farmers and that the agricultural sector should not be viewed negatively but as an attractive and profitable venture that is rewarding.

 

Meanwhile, Abbie Mugugu-Mhene Executive Director of the Women and Resources in Eastern and Southern Africa said most African governments still allocate about 5 percent of their budgets to agriculture, contrary to the Maputo declaration where member states agreed to spend about 10 percent of their budgets.

She said only 7 out of the 49 countries are consistently allocating the 10 percent target.

 

Dr. Mugugu-Mhene said failure to allocate the required 10 percent is holding back food production and food security in Africa, where 223 million people live in hunger and poverty.

 

In a related event, the World Bank in partnership with ONE Campaign have launched a report, “Levelling the Field: Improving Opportunities for Women Farmers in Africa” whose findings among others indicate that women farmers in Africa can contribute significantly to food security if given resources and an enabling environment.

 

According to Sipho Moyo, ONE Campaign Africa Director, the study which was conducted in six African countries of Malawi, Rwanda, Ghana, Niger, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda represents the strongest evidence to date of how deep and entrenched the gender gap in African agriculture really is and what needs to be done about it.

 

The report also outlines a number of policy recommendations for governments to consider to better support women farmers. 

 

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