Neolithic Era
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Mongols China and the Silk Road: Dongba culture linked to Neolithic cave paintings

Mongols China and the Silk Road: Dongba culture linked to Neolithic cave paintings | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Deep in mountains of #Yunnan province, #Naxi adherents of #Dongba religion took after Neolithic forebears http://t.co/HArOtDbGQB

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Three-Legged Crow, The Tripedal Crow, Sanzuwu, Sānzúwū, Sam'zuk'wu, Sae tsoh u, Yatagarasu, Samjok-o

Three-Legged Crow, The Tripedal Crow,  Sanzuwu, Sānzúwū, Sam'zuk'wu, Sae tsoh u, Yatagarasu, Samjok-o | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it

 

The three-legged (or tripedal) crow is a supernatural creature found in various parts of the world including Asia, Asia Minor, and North Africa.

 

It is believed by many cultures to inhabit and represent the sun.

 

This seems to vary depending on cultural folklore...

 

Some of the more common ones include:

 

Chinese:

The three-legged crow in Chinese folklore is called Sānzúwū.It dates back to the Zhou dynasty (11th to 3rd century BC), when it appeared as a decoration on formal imperial garments... 

 

The earliest known depiction of a three-legged crow appears in Neolithic pottery of the Yangshao culture... Sanzuwu is referred to as Sun crow, and usually depicted as red rather than black...


It is responsible for the sun’s passage across the sky. There are many legends of this bird, e.g.:

The Chinese sun goddess was the mother to ten child-suns. Every day one of the children would be carried to the top of a mulberry tree on the back of a crow, and then fly into the sky to be the sun for each day.

 

Each child took turns each day so there was light during the days.

 

It is said that one day, all ten child-suns ascended to the sky on the same day and scorched Earth to drought.

 

The emperor, who also happened to be their father, tried to convince the child-suns to ascend one at a time, but after they did not listen, he ordered an archer to shoot them down.

 

It just happened that one of the child-suns was visiting the underworld that day and hence was not killed.

 

Folklore says this three-legged crow now lives inside the sun...

 

Japanese:

In Japan the tripedal crow is called Yatagarasu. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano to what would become Yamato.

 

It is generally accepted that Yatagarasu is an incarnation of Taketsunimi no mikoto...

 

The word Yatagarasu has been translated as “eight-span crow” (i.e. giant crow) or and deemed to mean Supreme (or Perfect) Divine Crow (the number ‘eight’ in Japanese numerology having the meanings of ‘many’ or ‘a multitude’, or ‘perfect’ or ‘supreme’) or just “large crow”.

 

Although there is no description in the ancient historical chronicles stating that the Yatagarasu was specifically three-legged,  the crow has been depicted as such at various shrine locations...

Shrine or temple traditions clearly state the crow is three-legged.

http://bit.ly/1cFCKj3

 

Korean:

During the period of the Koguryo Kingdom, the Samjok-o was a highly regarded symbol of power, thought superior to both the dragon and the Korean phoenix...

 

The three-legged crow was one of several emblems under consideration to replace the phoenix in the Korean seal of state when its revision was considered in 2008...

 

 

Resources:

http://bit.ly/s3gjBa

http://bit.ly/1cFCKj3

http://bit.ly/1eeOuqJ

http://bit.ly/15uM30N

http://bit.ly/1gxPkRp

http://bit.ly/1bknLHu

http://bit.ly/1auZ9uH

http://bit.ly/1eeOM0I

http://bit.ly/15uPzIl

 

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/19wweYR

 


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Mhd.Shadi Khudr's curator insight, October 11, 2013 9:14 PM

 

Spotted recently:
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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 18, 2013 12:29 AM

this was so long it deserved to me scooped.

Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:12 PM

Great, NOW they worship birth defects... what the hell is wrong with this picture?

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HUNTER-GATHERERS TO FARMERS

HUNTER-GATHERERS TO FARMERS | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
HUNTER-GATHERERS TO FARMERS including Doing what comes naturally, The Neolithic Revolution, The first farmers, Farm animals, Draught animals, Neolithic burials, Diet, salt and trade

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Alexis Loftin's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:36 PM

This article was talking about basically how we as people went form hunters to farmers it talks a lot about the neolithic period. 

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6,000-year-old Wine Discovered in Kavala

6,000-year-old Wine Discovered in Kavala | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
In the prehistoric settlement of Dikili Tash were discovered the oldest samples of wine that were ever recorded in Europe. The samples date back to 4200 BC and reverse existing data regarding the w...

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:04 PM

Wine burried under ground found

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The Knowth macehead: a Neolithic marvel | Irish Archaeology

The Knowth macehead: a Neolithic marvel | Irish Archaeology | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth.

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpufv

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf

This stunning flint macehead was found deep within the darkest recesses of the great Neolithic passage tomb at Knowth, Co. Meath. Hidden for millennia, it was discovered in 1982 during an excavation carried out by Dr George Eogan. It is fashioned out a single piece of pale-grey flint, splashed with patches of brown, and is polished and decorated on all six sides.

The principle motifs employed are finely carved spirals and lozenges.  On one side these symbols appear to form a human face, with the shaft hole defining a wide, gaping mouth. This object represents one of the finest artifacts from Neolithic Europe and it displays a high level of both technical and artistic sophistication.

- See more at: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2013/02/the-knowth-macehead/#sthash.t0SwsnKZ.dpuf
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David Connolly's curator insight, March 1, 2013 2:46 AM

What a stunning piece!

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 2, 2013 10:13 PM

Amazing!

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Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar

Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it

Throughout the excavations at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney, numerous examples of Neolithic “art” have been uncovered. In fact, by 2010 around 80 “decorated” items had emerged from the site.


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joseph mora's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:31 PM

Art found from excavations from the neolithic period. they held engrave picture from simple to more complexed.

Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:35 PM

All I've got to say is... Damn they had skill!

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 14, 2013 2:06 AM

This scoop is about the discovery of a Neolithic dated engraved stone at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney

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Europe's Early Settlers Uncovered - National Geographic

Europe's Early Settlers Uncovered - National Geographic | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
National Geographic Europe's Early Settlers Uncovered National Geographic Genographic Project Director and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, Spencer Wells expounds: “spanning a period from the dawn of farming during the Neolithic period...

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Neolithic stone puts spotlight on Perthshire glen's ancient history - The Courier

Neolithic stone puts spotlight on Perthshire glen's ancient history - The Courier | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
The Courier Neolithic stone puts spotlight on Perthshire glen's ancient history The Courier It has since been identified as a possible Neolithic quern stone — potentially more than 6,000 years old — with its shape created by years of rubbing grain...

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Neolithic shamanism?

Neolithic shamanism? | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
I've been studying the Neolithic period now for more than 8 years, and I really do think that we can observe shamanic attributes in their way of life, from monument building to daily life. In this ...

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:41 PM

8 years? Wow. But anyways, this person's guess is probably right. I mean, why not? What proof is there that there were no shamanic beliefs going around? What if it was a secret, with no physical tools involved? What if... right?

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Neolithic city ruins shed light on the dawn of Chinese civilization

Neolithic city ruins shed light on the dawn of Chinese civilization | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Located at the northern brim of the Yellow Plateau in Shaanxi Province, an enormous ancient city ruin covers four square kilometres - the largest city ruins found from the Neolithic period in China. The ruins are considered to ...

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The Neolithic Revolution: How Farming Changed The World

The Neolithic Revolution: How Farming Changed The World | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Of all the revolutions recorded by history, the biggest of all was actually occurred before anybody could write. The Neolithic Revolution transformed human beings in ways that seem scarcely believable today.

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:16 PM

Wasn't there this one woman who suddenly figured out how wheat worked? ...or was that in some documentary that lied to the world... meh.

Alexis Loftin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 3:42 PM

This articel is talking about neolithic revolution, and how people started to settle, fasrming and start eating differents type of food. And this became a lifestyle. Because farming was hard work. 

Raymond McGee's curator insight, February 8, 2014 2:41 AM

This article really goes into depth of how the Neolithic's changed farming and agriculture. We have learned many agriculture tips from the Neolithic's.

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Neolithic settlement reconstructed

Neolithic settlement reconstructed | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
A neolithic settlement in Biskupin, north central Poland, is being reconstructed with the aid of EU funding.

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf


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Louise Zarmati's comment, September 27, 2013 11:04 PM
Good point Shannon. The reality is that most archaeological sites that are open to the public like this one are conserved and interpreted, so they are really (re)constructions. I guess it's the actual site of the ancient city but the 'Open Air Archaeological Museum' is the interpretation.
Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:39 PM

I could ave sworn I already posted soemthing about this... it seems somehow familiar. Oh well. My orriginal thought was something along the lines of this whole "reconstricting" idea being somehow not really true. It's and ancient city. If you "reconstruct" it, it's no longer ancient.

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:09 PM

This scoop is about how a neolithic settlement called "Biskupin" located in Northern Poland is being rebuilt thanks to funds up to 1 million Euros from EU.

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The Archaeology News Network: Neolithic ruins shed light on dawn ...

The Archaeology News Network: Neolithic ruins shed light on dawn ... | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Located at the northern brim of the Yellow Plateau in Shaanxi Province, an enormous ancient city ruin covers four square kilometres - the largest city ruins found from the Neolithic period in China. The ruins are considered to ...
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Neolithic death ritual includes earliest evidence for European beer

Neolithic death ritual includes earliest evidence for European beer | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Spanish archaeologists discovered what they claim to be the earliest scientific evidence of European beer consumption amongst the remains of Neolithic bodies found in a cave

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Katherine Koch's curator insight, January 16, 2014 7:20 PM

Evidence of beer consumption during the Neolithic period found in Barcelona site

Sean P Burns's curator insight, January 31, 2014 5:36 PM

Four human skeletons (in good state of preservation) were found dated to be about 6,400 years old. The skeletons consisted of 2 adults and 2 children. One of the adult skeletons was buried with a two handle drinking vessel. The cup of the male had oxalate and barley-corn phytoliths found, which has been the earliest evidence of fermented beer. Beer might have been part of the death ritual.

Kelsey Cherise Quates's curator insight, April 9, 2014 11:52 PM

 The archaeological dig uncovered some forgotten history, the dig revealed some of the most early burial sites ever. Along with the burial site they found many other things such as stone tools, jewelry, and also food. Among all of the bodies that were uncovered they also found barley and other ingredients used to make beer.

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Twelve burnt mounds and Neolithic paddle found at wetland site –...

Twelve burnt mounds and Neolithic paddle found at wetland site –... | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have unearthed a series of hugely significant monuments forming a complex prehistoric landscape at Bradford Kaims in Northumberland

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David Connolly's curator insight, November 15, 2013 5:44 PM

Archaeologists working on the Bradford Kaims Wetland Heritage Project in north Northumberland, United Kingdom and supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and English Heritage, have unearthed a series of hugely significant archaeological monuments forming a complex prehistoric landscape.

Cameron Crowell's curator insight, November 15, 2013 10:15 PM

Neolithic Paddle found, maybe fraternities were a little older than we thought

Kasey Saeturn's curator insight, November 16, 2013 2:10 AM

It's intriguing to find out that an area of land that you've walked on always was actually an area of pre-historic life. 

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Neolithic cave dwelling found in NW China- China.org.cn

#China Neolithic cave dwelling found in NW China http://t.co/f8tWd3UjIo

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 25, 2013 10:07 PM
wish it gave more information without me having to click it but its interesting
Joel Mondragon's curator insight, November 2, 2013 1:03 AM

This article was very interesting, because it describes an archeological discovery from ancient Neolithic China. The site was significant because it contained intact artifacts including houses from that time period. Various types of pottery and ceramics were also found with distinctive patterns.  

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On Food and Funerals in the Middle Neolithic | Bones Don't Lie

On Food and Funerals in the Middle Neolithic | Bones Don't Lie | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
I've talked before about the close relationship between food and funerals, specifically in relationship to what Anthony Bourdain has taught me about the importance of food within cultures. The food served during a funeral is a ...

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:40 PM

So, since they burried their dead below houses, would that mean they dined with the dead too?

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Stone Age farmers, hunters kept their distance

Stone Age farmers, hunters kept their distance | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Neolithic skeletons in German cave provide reminder of the power of social boundaries.

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Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:48 PM

This story explores the differencesbetween Neolithic farmers and indigenious people of Europe. The indigenious people first moved away from the new settlers and then came back. Throughout this time, each culture was distant from each other and never meshed. The two cultures were distinctly different and neither planned on mixing their cultures together.

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Neolithic Hunting Gear Found in Norwegian Glacier

Neolithic Hunting Gear Found in Norwegian Glacier | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Near the old viking capital of Trondheim, Norway, researchers have unearthed an ancient longbow, a hunter's tunic, and a set of five arrows. The gear ...

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:28 AM

Now we just need to resurect some acient animals, a neolithic hunter, and reinvent the neolithic age :D

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Early neolithic figurines discovered at Tel Motza : Past Horizons Archaeology

Early neolithic figurines discovered at Tel Motza : Past Horizons Archaeology | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it

Two figurines dating to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) – eighth millennium BCE – were discovered during excavations carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority and currently under-way at Tel Motza, prior to construction work on the new Highway 1 from Sha’ar HaGai to Jerusalem.


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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:54 AM

This arictle is about early Neolithic Figurines that have been Discovered. They found Ancient Pottery in Tel Motzaby Israel Antiquities Authority. It was stated by Anna Erikh and Dr.Hamoudi Khalaily,' The figurines, are 9,000-9,500 yrs ago, found..in foundations built of Fieldstones..made of mud brick'. Neolithic Pottery is rare and very unique findings.These findings from the Neolithic period are able to un-fold many mysteries and new evidence of out history. 

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Should Humans Drink Cow’s Milk? New Study of Neolithic Farmers May Have the Answer | Ancient Origins

Should Humans Drink Cow’s Milk? New Study of Neolithic Farmers May Have the Answer | Ancient Origins | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Many would remember the days when a milk trolley would be rolled out during morning recess at school and all the children would come running for their daily glass of milk, or the TV images of energetic children racing around the playground with the...

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Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture

Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it

The European Neolithization ~6000−4000 BC represents a pivotal change in human history when farming spread and the mobile style of life of the hunter-foragers was superseded by the agrarian culture.

Permanent settlement structures and agricultural production systems required fundamental innovations in technology, subsistence, and resource utilization. Motivation, course, and timing of this transformation, however, remain debatable.

 

Here we present annually resolved and absolutely dated dendroarchaeological information from four wooden water wells of the early Neolithic period that were excavated in Eastern Germany. A total of 151 oak timbers preserved in a waterlogged environment were dated between 5469 and 5098 BC and reveal unexpectedly refined carpentry skills.

 

The recently discovered water wells enable for the first time a detailed insight into the earliest wood architecture and display the technological capabilities of humans ~7000 years ago. The timbered well constructions made of old oak trees feature an unopened tree-ring archive from which annually resolved and absolutely dated environmental data can be culled.

 

Our results question the principle of continuous evolutionary development in prehistoric technology, and contradict the common belief that metal was necessary for complex timber constructions. Early Neolithic craftsmanship now suggests that the first farmers were also the first carpenters.

 

Citation: Tegel W, Elburg R, Hakelberg D, Stäuble H, Büntgen U (2012) Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51374. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051374


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David Connolly's curator insight, January 4, 2013 4:16 AM

Important article from PLOSone regarding the ability of Neolithic societies could have sophisticated carpentry without metal tools

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:02 AM

This scoop is about how some wooden water wells that were excavated in Eastern Germany give insight on to what the earliest wood was used for the wells. 

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Alcohol's Neolithic Origins: Brewing Up a Civilization - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Alcohol's Neolithic Origins: Brewing Up a Civilization - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Did our Neolithic ancestors turn to agriculture so that they could be sure of a tipple? US Archaeologist Patrick McGovern thinks so.The expert on identifying traces of alcohol in prehistoric sites reckons the thirst for a brew was enough of an incentive to start growing crops.

 

It turns out the fall of man probably didn't begin with an apple. More likely, it was a handful of mushy figs that first led humankind astray.

 

Here is how the story likely began -- a prehistoric human picked up some dropped fruit from the ground and popped it unsuspectingly into his or her mouth. The first effect was nothing more than an agreeably bittersweet flavor spreading across the palate. But as alcohol entered the bloodstream, the brain started sending out a new message -- whatever that was, I want more of it!

 

Humankind's first encounters with alcohol in the form of fermented fruit probably occurred in just such an accidental fashion. But once they were familiar with the effect, archaeologist Patrick McGovern believes, humans stopped at nothing in their pursuit of frequent intoxication.

A secure supply of alcohol appears to have been part of the human community's basic requirements much earlier than was long believed. As early as around 9,000 years ago, long before the invention of the wheel, inhabitants of the Neolithic village Jiahu in China were brewing a type of mead with an alcohol content of 10 percent, McGovern discovered recently.

 

McGovern analyzed clay shards found during excavations in China's Yellow River Valley at his Biomolecular Archaeology Laboratory for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum......................................

 

 


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The earth mother of all Neolithic discoveries

The earth mother of all Neolithic discoveries | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it

French archaeologists have discovered an extremely rare example of a neolithic "earth mother" figurine on the banks of the river Somme.


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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:36 AM

The webpage of Archaeology News Network, Writes about a discovery of French archaeologists tumble cross a rare neolithic "earth mother" figurine on the banks of the river Somme.(by Tann,) 

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:42 PM

This 6,000 year old figurine was found by the banks of Somme. The figurine depicts a woman and has taken on the name of "Lady of Villers-Carbonne". Some Neolithic experts guess that it is a figurine of a fertility goddess. The find was rare since most Neolithic findings have been found in Southern Europe while this was discovered in Northern Europe.

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Bones from Neolithic era found in Turkey's Hasankeyf

ARCHAEOLOGY - Bones from Neolithic era found in Turkey's Hasankeyf | Neolithic Era | Scoop.it
Excavations carried out by a Japanese team in Batman’s ancient city of Hasankeyf have revealed (RT @archaeoinaction: Top story: ARCHAEOLOGY - Bones from Neolithic era found in Turkey's Hasankeyf http://t.co/TxR4q4DpAt,...

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Xuyiwang's curator insight, September 7, 2013 3:05 PM

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Raymond McGee's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:23 AM

I didnt know neolithic era spread ti Hasankeyf. This is cool fact that i now know.