Neolithic China
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Geographical variation of foxtail millet, Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv. based on rDNA PCR–RFLP - Springer

Geographical variation of foxtail millet, Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv. based on rDNA PCR–RFLP - Springer | Neolithic China | Scoop.it

The rDNA PCR–RFLP of foxtail millet (Setaria italica) germ-plasm collected throughout Eurasia and from a part of Africa was investigated with five restriction enzymes according to our previous study. Foxtail millet germ-plasms were classified by length of the rDNA IGS and RFLP; clear geographical differentiation was observed between East Asia, the Nansei Islands of Japan-Taiwan-the Philippines area, South Asia and Afghanistan-Pakistan. We also found evidence of migration of foxtail millet landraces between the areas. We calculated diversity index (D) for each region and found that center of diversity of this millet is East Asia such as China, Korea and Japan.


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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, January 11, 2013 11:02 AM

While the high diversity in East Asia is unsurprising given the origins there, what is of note is the lack of diversity in both India and Southeast Asia, suggested ral bottlenecks and limited reintroductions to those regions. Also there is a clear divide between SE Asia and South Asia (with Burma grouping with India) which is to be noted. This division parallels that in rice which has led me to postulate japonica introduction to India via central Asia (also supported by archaeological evidence: see http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12520-010-0035-y ;). Curiously the  South Asian type is also evident in the Himalayas (e.g. Bhutan) despite the presence of Sino-Tibetan that one would expect to have carried diversity from central China.

Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, January 11, 2013 11:04 AM

Interesting to see the genetic similarity between Indian and eastern African foxtail millets. Although I suppose this could be due to recent/colonial introductions rather than anything ancient.

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PLOS ONE: Early Mixed Farming of Millet and Rice 7800 Years Ago in the Middle Yellow River Region, China

PLOS ONE: Early Mixed Farming of Millet and Rice 7800 Years Ago in the Middle Yellow River Region, China | Neolithic China | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

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Starch grains analysis of stone knives from Changning site, Qinghai Province, Northwest China

Starch grains analysis of stone knives from Changning site, Qinghai Province, Northwest China | Neolithic China | Scoop.it

► Discuss the function of stone knife and plants use using the starch grains analysis. ► Indicate the stone knives may have been used for a variety of activities. ► Reveal that diverse crops were cultivated at Changning site in Qinghai Province 4000 years ago.

A total of 153 starch grains were retrieved from three stone knives, from which we identified starches from legumes, the Triticeae tribe, foxtail millet (Setaria italica), broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum), roots and tubers.

 


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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, January 19, 2013 12:05 PM

No surprising claims, and this would seem an approach with potential for relating tools to activities. Still it would be nice to see this alongside flotation samples from the same site for a more holistic view of plant activities.