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Astounding Neolithic Site — Göbekli Tepe | HolyLandPhotos' Blog

Astounding Neolithic Site — Göbekli Tepe | HolyLandPhotos' Blog | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
This past week I posted 17 images of Göbekli Tepe ("Potbelly Hill")—a Neolithic site located about 9 mi. north of Sanliurfa in south–central Turkey that I visited this past spring. This 22 acre site was functional from roughly 9600 ...
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about Gobekli Tepe, known today as, "Potbelly Hill". It's  Neolithic religious site that was functional from 9,600 B.C. to 8,200 B.C.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:39 PM

In holylandphotos they posted images of a Neolithic site that contain Limestone Pillars. These pillars are said to be around "18 ft hight and weighed 16 tons". These pillars are said to be "carved, transported, and erected—in 9,600 BC." 

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Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Archaeology News
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Swiss dolmen reveals rituals of the Neolithic : Past Horizons Archaeology

Swiss dolmen reveals rituals of the Neolithic : Past Horizons Archaeology | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

A sensational archaeological discovery has been made in the region of  Bern, Switzerland, consisting of a communal dolmen grave dating back to over 5,000 years, containing 30 bodies and Neolithic artefacts. It represents the first intact burial chamber to be found north of the Alps.


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about a Neolithic site in Bern,Switzerland which was a great find considering all of the grave goods and bodies found on the site.

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 3, 2013 2:28 AM

This finding represents the first intact burial chamber to be found north of the Alps.

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 14, 2013 2:04 AM

This scoop is about the archeological finds that have been discovered in Bern, Switzerland. 

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Ancient Origins of Science
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3,500-Year-Old Neolithic Cranial Amulets Shed Light on Ancient Belief System | Science and Technology

3,500-Year-Old Neolithic Cranial Amulets Shed Light on Ancient Belief System | Science and Technology | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
In 1914, a Swiss amateur archaeologist, Ernest Roulin, approached the Museum of Science and Art in Ireland with an incredibly rare discovery – two ancient amulets made from fragments of human cranium.

Via Ruby Carat
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about some amulets that were made out of the craninial bones found in Switzerland by an archaelogist names Ernest Roulin. 

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, November 16, 2013 12:44 AM

What makes you so sure its a amulet? I thought it would at least look dazzling

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, January 29, 2:19 PM

This necklace seems like the perfect artifact to bury someone with. We get our burial traditions and practices from way back, apparently.

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Swiss dolmen reveals rituals of the Neolithic : Past Horizons Archaeology

Swiss dolmen reveals rituals of the Neolithic : Past Horizons Archaeology | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

A sensational archaeological discovery has been made in the region of  Bern, Switzerland, consisting of a communal dolmen grave dating back to over 5,000 years, containing 30 bodies and Neolithic artefacts. It represents the first intact burial chamber to be found north of the Alps.


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about the archeological finds that have been discovered in Bern, Switzerland. 

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Jahaiyra Albert's curator insight, October 3, 2013 2:28 AM

This finding represents the first intact burial chamber to be found north of the Alps.

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:15 PM

This scoop is about a Neolithic site in Bern,Switzerland which was a great find considering all of the grave goods and bodies found on the site.

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Herstory
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Men, Women, and Inequality in the Neolithic

Men, Women, and Inequality in the Neolithic | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

Does the rich dude get the hot chick -- even in prehistory?


Via Deanna Dahlsad
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop explores the who the  greater gender was in Neolithic times.

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Neolithic settlement reconstructed

Neolithic settlement reconstructed | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
A neolithic settlement in Biskupin, north central Poland, is being reconstructed with the aid of EU funding.

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf

The project is being carried out as an extension of the Open Air Archaeological Museum at the site.

“Biskupin's archaeological reserve is not only one of the most famous museums of its kind in Poland, but also in Central Europe,” said Piotr Calbecki, the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province's elected assembly leader (marshal), in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP).

“This place has gained a well-deserved reputation, thanks to consistent development... and we are now using the opportunity to enrich the site,” he said.

- See more at: http://www.thenews.pl/1/11/Artykul/144785,Neolithic-settlement-reconstructed#sthash.SUZA0ZXs.dpuf


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about how a neolithic settlement called "Biskupin" located in Northern Poland is being rebuilt thanks to funds up to 1 million Euros from EU.

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Louise Zarmati's comment, September 27, 2013 11:04 PM
Good point Shannon. The reality is that most archaeological sites that are open to the public like this one are conserved and interpreted, so they are really (re)constructions. I guess it's the actual site of the ancient city but the 'Open Air Archaeological Museum' is the interpretation.
Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:39 PM

I could ave sworn I already posted soemthing about this... it seems somehow familiar. Oh well. My orriginal thought was something along the lines of this whole "reconstricting" idea being somehow not really true. It's and ancient city. If you "reconstruct" it, it's no longer ancient.

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The earth mother of all Neolithic discoveries

The earth mother of all Neolithic discoveries | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

French archaeologists have discovered an extremely rare example of a neolithic "earth mother" figurine on the banks of the river Somme.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This 6,000 year old figurine was found by the banks of Somme. The figurine depicts a woman and has taken on the name of "Lady of Villers-Carbonne". Some Neolithic experts guess that it is a figurine of a fertility goddess. The find was rare since most Neolithic findings have been found in Southern Europe while this was discovered in Northern Europe.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:36 AM

The webpage of Archaeology News Network, Writes about a discovery of French archaeologists tumble cross a rare neolithic "earth mother" figurine on the banks of the river Somme.(by Tann,) 

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Prehistory and Ancient History
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Ancient city unearthed in Iraq may be 3300 years old - NBCNews.com

Ancient city unearthed in Iraq may be 3300 years old - NBCNews.com | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Ancient city unearthed in Iraq may be 3300 years old NBCNews.com A domestic structure, with at least two rooms, that may date to relatively late in the life of the newfound ancient city, perhaps around 2,000 years ago when the Parthian Empire...

Via Ruby Carat, Laura Brown
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about a new city that was discovered in Iraq.  The new excavation is exciting and is thought that this city was under the control of the Assyrian Empire. Researchers have given this city site the name but fail to mention it in the description.

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Twitter / ikpln: #Catalhoyuk the bountiful, ...

Twitter / ikpln: #Catalhoyuk the bountiful, ... | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
RT @ikpln: #Catalhoyuk the bountiful, bounteous... #neolithic #konya #konia #archaeology http://t.co/otMdV1Kyx3

Via Kasey Saeturn
Sarah Kerr's insight:

Though this isn't necessarily a website that is giving information on Catal Hoyuk, it is a live representation of what is going on there today.

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Kasey Saeturn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 11:21 PM

This image is crazy. The archaeologists have dug up so much and discovered so much of the ancient Catal Hoyuk it's just amazing.

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from The Neolithic Period
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Dog walker finds neolithic skull - Evesham Journal

Dog walker finds neolithic skull - Evesham Journal | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Evesham Journal
Dog walker finds neolithic skull
Evesham Journal
AN UNUSUAL discovery during a routine dog walk has turnd out to be one of the oldest remains found in Worcestershire.

Via Courtney Wong
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This is cool read about how a guy who was walking his dog found an Neolithic skull buried in the dirt. Now, even though this article is not necessarily about a Neolithic city or custom, it is still very cool to hear about people stumbling upon these ancient artifacts everyday all around the world. 

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Stone Age foodies enjoyed spicy meals, say archaelogists - Christian Science Monitor

Stone Age foodies enjoyed spicy meals, say archaelogists - Christian Science Monitor | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Christian Science Monitor Stone Age foodies enjoyed spicy meals, say archaelogists Christian Science Monitor The charred pots were excavated from archaeological sites in Denmark and Germany, and date back to the Neolithic Period, roughly 6,200 to...

Via David Grijalva
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about how some researchers found ancient Neolithic cookwear only to discover that the people who used it thousands of years ago were cooking savvy. The researchers found a spice residue on the cookwear that suggests that the people in the Neolithic Age knew how to add a kick into their daily meals.

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Cavemen Were Better at Depicting Quadruped Walking than Modern Artists:

Cavemen Were Better at Depicting Quadruped Walking than Modern Artists: | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: The experts of animal locomotion well know the characteristics of quadruped walking since the pioneering work of Eadweard Muybridge in the 1880s.

 

Most of the quadrupeds advance their legs in the same lateral sequence when walking, and only the timing of their supporting feet differ more or less. How did this scientific knowledge influence the correctness of quadruped walking depictions in the fine arts? Did the proportion of erroneous quadruped walking illustrations relative to their total number (i.e. error rate) decrease after Muybridge?

 

How correctly have cavemen (upper palaeolithic Homo sapiens) illustrated the walking of their quadruped prey in prehistoric times? The aim of this work is to answer these questions. We have analyzed 1000 prehistoric and modern artistic quadruped walking depictions and determined whether they are correct or not in respect of the limb attitudes presented, assuming that the other aspects of depictions used to determine the animals gait are illustrated correctly.

 

The error rate of modern pre-Muybridgean quadruped walking illustrations was 83.5%, much more than the error rate of 73.3% of mere chance. It decreased to 57.9% after 1887, that is in the post-Muybridgean period. Most surprisingly, the prehistoric quadruped walking depictions had the lowest error rate of 46.2%.

 

All these differences were statistically significant. Thus, cavemen were more keenly aware of the slower motion of their prey animals and illustrated quadruped walking more precisely than later artists.


Via David Connolly
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Neolithic death ritual includes earliest evidence for European beer

Neolithic death ritual includes earliest evidence for European beer | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Spanish archaeologists discovered what they claim to be the earliest scientific evidence of European beer consumption amongst the remains of Neolithic bodies found in a cave

Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about a site found in not day Barcelona area of Spain. What makes this site standout is not the fact that the bodies dated to be about 6,400 yeabut old, but that from the grave goods excavated, the first trace of beer was discovered as a grave goods buried within the graves.

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Katherine Koch's curator insight, January 16, 7:20 PM

Evidence of beer consumption during the Neolithic period found in Barcelona site

Sean P Burns's curator insight, January 31, 5:36 PM

Four human skeletons (in good state of preservation) were found dated to be about 6,400 years old. The skeletons consisted of 2 adults and 2 children. One of the adult skeletons was buried with a two handle drinking vessel. The cup of the male had oxalate and barley-corn phytoliths found, which has been the earliest evidence of fermented beer. Beer might have been part of the death ritual.

Kelsey Cherise Quates's curator insight, April 9, 11:52 PM

 The archaeological dig uncovered some forgotten history, the dig revealed some of the most early burial sites ever. Along with the burial site they found many other things such as stone tools, jewelry, and also food. Among all of the bodies that were uncovered they also found barley and other ingredients used to make beer.

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Archaeology News
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Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar

Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

Throughout the excavations at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney, numerous examples of Neolithic “art” have been uncovered. In fact, by 2010 around 80 “decorated” items had emerged from the site.


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about the discovery of a Neolithic dated engraved stone at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:31 PM

Art found from excavations from the neolithic period. they held engrave picture from simple to more complexed.

Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:35 PM

All I've got to say is... Damn they had skill!

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Ancient Origins of Science
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Encounters with the Neolithic (1)

Encounters with the Neolithic (1) | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
On a visit to Avebury, we each commune with the Neolithic ancestors in our own way. (Screw Stonehenge. We went to Avebury, where you can get up close and personal with the stones. Possibly too personal.

Via Ruby Carat
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about a nearby area close to stonehenge which also has some of the vast intricate stones. In Avebury, one can get up close and personal and really examine the stones as much as possible.

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Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from Archaeology Articles and Books
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Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture

Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

The European Neolithization ~6000−4000 BC represents a pivotal change in human history when farming spread and the mobile style of life of the hunter-foragers was superseded by the agrarian culture.

Permanent settlement structures and agricultural production systems required fundamental innovations in technology, subsistence, and resource utilization. Motivation, course, and timing of this transformation, however, remain debatable.

 

Here we present annually resolved and absolutely dated dendroarchaeological information from four wooden water wells of the early Neolithic period that were excavated in Eastern Germany. A total of 151 oak timbers preserved in a waterlogged environment were dated between 5469 and 5098 BC and reveal unexpectedly refined carpentry skills.

 

The recently discovered water wells enable for the first time a detailed insight into the earliest wood architecture and display the technological capabilities of humans ~7000 years ago. The timbered well constructions made of old oak trees feature an unopened tree-ring archive from which annually resolved and absolutely dated environmental data can be culled.

 

Our results question the principle of continuous evolutionary development in prehistoric technology, and contradict the common belief that metal was necessary for complex timber constructions. Early Neolithic craftsmanship now suggests that the first farmers were also the first carpenters.

 

Citation: Tegel W, Elburg R, Hakelberg D, Stäuble H, Büntgen U (2012) Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51374. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051374


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about how some wooden water wells that were excavated in Eastern Germany give insight on to what the earliest wood was used for the wells. 

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David Connolly's curator insight, January 4, 2013 4:16 AM

Important article from PLOSone regarding the ability of Neolithic societies could have sophisticated carpentry without metal tools

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Stone Age farmers, hunters kept their distance

Stone Age farmers, hunters kept their distance | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Neolithic skeletons in German cave provide reminder of the power of social boundaries.

Via The QI Elves
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This story explores the differencesbetween Neolithic farmers and indigenious people of Europe. The indigenious people first moved away from the new settlers and then came back. Throughout this time, each culture was distant from each other and never meshed. The two cultures were distinctly different and neither planned on mixing their cultures together.

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Incredible examples of ancient writing found in lost city in Iraq - io9

Incredible examples of ancient writing found in lost city in Iraq - io9 | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Headlines & Global News Incredible examples of ancient writing found in lost city in Iraq io9 Often when archaeologists find a lost city or civilization, they have to puzzle out what life was like there based on buildings and objects like pots and...

Via Matthew Ganibi
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is connected to the earlier one about the new city discovered in Iraq. This scoop goes into detail about an artifact found at the site, a clay tablet with what seems to be writing on it. The same team who is working on the excavation of the city know known to be called Idu, are the ones who found this artifact. This scoop also goes into detail about the Idu's and how long they were under the Assryians and how they fought for their freedom from them.

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'Neolithic' burial mound to be built

'Neolithic' burial mound to be built | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it

A modern working "Neolithic" burial mound is to be built in Wiltshire.

The 50m (160ft) long barrow at All Cannings near Devizes, will contain niches that will house urns.

Work is expected to begin next spring and be completed by the summer, after Wiltshire Council approved the plans subject to planning conditions such as parking and landscaping.


Via David Connolly
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about how, starting next year a Neolithic burial mound will be constructed to resemble the same kind that were popular in Neolithic TImes.

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Taphonomic Analysis of Neolithic Seated Burials | Bones Don't Lie

Taphonomic Analysis of Neolithic Seated Burials | Bones Don't Lie | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
In this post, the focus is on a new journal article that proposes a careful examination at the taphonomy associated with Pre-Pottery Neolithic burials from the Near East can reveal patterns in what was thought to be random ...

Via Ashanti Coffee
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about the different variations people in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B age took when it came to burying the dead.

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Ashanti Coffee's curator insight, October 4, 2013 5:54 AM

basically, the PPNB people at Tell Halula practiced far more advanced burials than others at this time. Instead of horizontal burials, they did seated burials. Here, archeologists examine why. 

Rescooped by Sarah Kerr from The Neolithic Period
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Stone Age Bow and Arrows Uncovered in Norway - Discovery News

Stone Age Bow and Arrows Uncovered in Norway - Discovery News | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
Stone Age Bow and Arrows Uncovered in Norway
Discovery News
A Neolithic bow and arrows were recently unearthed when a snow patch that had remained untouched for thousands of years melted. Hojem/Callanan-NTNU.

Via Courtney Wong
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop uncovers a new discovery of  a Neolithic bow and arrow found in Norway. Though this discovery was found in Northern Europe, pretty far from what region I am studying in class, it is still remarkable that after so much time this artifact was just recently found. There may be even more we have yet to discover about the Neolithic Age.

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Astounding Neolithic Site — Göbekli Tepe | HolyLandPhotos' Blog

Astounding Neolithic Site — Göbekli Tepe | HolyLandPhotos' Blog | Neolithic Age | Scoop.it
This past week I posted 17 images of Göbekli Tepe ("Potbelly Hill")—a Neolithic site located about 9 mi. north of Sanliurfa in south–central Turkey that I visited this past spring. This 22 acre site was functional from roughly 9600 ...
Sarah Kerr's insight:

This scoop is about Gobekli Tepe, known today as, "Potbelly Hill". It's  Neolithic religious site that was functional from 9,600 B.C. to 8,200 B.C.

more...
Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:39 PM

In holylandphotos they posted images of a Neolithic site that contain Limestone Pillars. These pillars are said to be around "18 ft hight and weighed 16 tons". These pillars are said to be "carved, transported, and erected—in 9,600 BC."