Nemetics
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Nemetics
Nemetics, based on the science of complexity, is a process to understand, model and resolve 'wicked problems' by leveraging authentic constraints in various fields like engineering, social and economic movements & transformations, architecture, design of arrival cities and entrepreneurship to name a few. In order to do so Nemetics has developed a neutral language that can be fluently applied across various disciplines and subjects. The primary tool that it uses is designed on vibration and waves, vibrating strings, tubes and fields characterized by frequencies and amplitudes, which are then expressed and modeled in probabilistic terms to resolve 'wicked issues and problems' through co-created re-design.
Curated by Dibyendu De
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Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied | Nemetics | Scoop.it

Kotter's 8 step process is applied in this case study example, happening now with NetApp.

  

NetApp’s staffer and post writer, Mercedes Adams, a 3rd year Guiding Coalition program manager describes her two year experience as a part of an advisory group, in this case named the guiding coalition team, to help accelerate change leadership. I heard Rob Salmon and John Kotter speak at the ACMP 2012 Global Change conference (described in other posts on this stream) regarding their transformation project in process.

  

Note:  Sometimes this approach creates a parallel organization, which can cause problems, and sometimes it's exactly what an organization needs.  Another approach is a collateral organization (temporary, ever changing ad hoc change groups.)  We'll see how the chips fall as Dr. Kotter's advisory team approach helps NetApp over the next few years.  ~  Deb

  

Excerpts:

  

in 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation that leverages the urgency and passion of employees across the business.

   

_______________________________

  

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

_______________________________

   

In 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation via  Harvard’s Dr. John Kotter and Kotter International.

   

The Guiding Coalition (GC) brings people together from across the company who operate as a team outside the organizational hierarchy. Employees:

   

take a break from their normal day jobs creatively solve problems and drive change Include a balance of individual contributors and managers, directors and vice presidents agree to leave their titles behind when participating on the Guiding Coalition knows that they will need to do this work in addition to their day jobs collectively identify and guide key business initiatives to accelerate NetApp’s growth evangelizes their change vision and drive a sense of urgency into the organization serves for a period of one year    

The first year over 350 passionate and urgent change leaders applied.

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

   

In addition to the members of the Guiding Coalition, hundreds of volunteers, subject matter experts, and change leaders across Field Operations collaborate with the members to drive changes into the culture.

  

NetApp is a rapidly growing company which has thrived through major changes over its 20 year history.

  

The Executive Vice Chairman, Tom Mendoza has a video blog, Tom Talks.

  

Writer Mercedes Adams is the Guiding Coalition Strategic Program Manager at NetApp. She’s been on the Field Operations team for over seven years and advocating change leadership for the last three. Mercedes shares her ideas on a number of topics via Twitter and LinkedIn.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Influence, Service and the 100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes

Influence, Service and the 100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"A great quote can provide personal inspiration and can be used to educate others. The contributor shares his top 100 leadership quotes of all time."

 

Excerpted (some of my own favorites taken from Kevin's list):

 

You don’t need a title to be a leader. –Multiple Attributions    A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way. —John Maxwell    My own definition of leadership is this: The capacity and the will to rally men and women to a common purpose and the character which inspires confidence. —General Montgomery    Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations. —Peter Drucker    Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has. —Margaret Mead    The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born-that there is a genetic factor to leadership. That’s nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born. —Warren Bennis    To command is to serve, nothing more and nothing less. —Andre Malraux     He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander. —Aristotle

 

Deb:  It seems to be true, per another Scoop, that leadership, in a sense, doesn't really exist, from Peter Drucker's perspective.  It is about trust, respect, leader development opportunity, influence and community (relationship / networks / feedback.)   That's my perspective on the leadership-train-talk.

 

(Have a favorite quote that didn't make the list? Share it in the comments section below.)


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Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward

Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"This provocative post highlights current business paradoxes challenging leaders:  change or remain stable, complexity versus simplicity, growth and sustainability and more."

 

After seeing evidence of our increasingly VUCA world, one that is growing in its Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous characteristics, this useful list of paradoxes resonates.  Does it resonate to your experience?

 

___________________________

  

Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

___________________________

   

 

Excerpted:

  

Paradox 1: growth versus sustainability

Growth as it is currently defined tends to result in an unquestioned and unchecked consumption of resources. Sustainability considerations are generally considered to put a major strain on growth ambitions.

 

The way forward is innovation, but another paradox present itself:

  

Paradox 2: innovating versus operating

Innovation is increasingly about service, process, business model and social innovation.

However, focusing on innovation does not mean ignoring operations. The trick is that what allows operations to thrive can seriously get in the way of innovation and vice versa.

  

Paradox 3:  change versus continuity

If you try to innovate too many things at once you will end up with chaos, if you do not change at all your organisation will decline. What is the right balance?

  

Paradox 4: collaboration versus competition

Business is inherently competitive yet today, collaboration is common, with most companies having collaborated with their suppliers and their customers. Leading companies are promoting collaboration through crowdsourcing or with competitors.

  

Paradox 5: complexity versus simplicity

Demands on leaders result in increasing levels of complexity, arising from the number of possible, unpredictable interactions between collaborate, compete; change, remain stable; innovation or operational excellence; growth or sustainability. Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

  

Paradox 6: Heart versus mind

Decisions need to be made in the face of incomplete analysis, unpredictable outcomes and changing circumstances. The foundations for analysis and factual arguments differ from emotional and visionary engagement; people who excel at one are not necessarily particularly good at the other and yet both are needed.

  

Read the full article by Dr Bettina von Stamm here.


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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."

 

Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb

 

Excerpts:

 

Elaine Rumboll suggests:

 

Adaptability Back Up Curiosity Diversity Ease of Access Foresight Grace in Failure Hubs Inclusiveness

 

The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:

 

be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react [let go of] things remaining stable

 

Read the full article here.

 

Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous


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There is no such thing as leadership – Peter Drucker classic, Change Leadership?

There is no such thing as leadership – Peter Drucker classic, Change Leadership? | Nemetics | Scoop.it

Wes Balda has written a compelling piece on Peter Drucker and our overwrought attention to defining leadership, which is timely, seeing the new Pew report on negative media and presidental election coverage.

 

Excerpts:


At lunch one day, [Wes] asked Peter to define leadership. He snorted in response, “There is no such thing as leadership.”

 

WB: He defended this by claiming it couldn’t be defined. He stressed that leaders were only labeled thus because they had followers.

 

PD: “At best, leadership may be a dimension of management,” he said, “and leaders could be identified because their actions were predictable, or perhaps trustworthy.”

_________________________


Leading could be how we manage, or make knowledge effective through relationships, in powerless environments.
_________________________

 

 

WB: ...Max DePree identified an important concept – the absence of power. Leading could be how we manage, or make knowledge effective through relationships, in powerless environments.


Results are achieved around or beyond the use of power. “Leading without power” may be the only way leadership works. By definition, then, using power in leading is not leading at all.

 

DN:  Perhaps it's just coercion, or intimidation.  From another article excerpted here, from Forbes, note the diagrammed split of leadership and management tools and the placement of "power tools."


WB:  So, when Drucker says leaders are only defined by the presence of followers, I believe he means that these followers first exist – and that they are absolutely free from all constraints in choosing to follow.


A well known video on being the first follower helps illustrate this point.

 

Power is absent, and the decision to follow creates the ultimate democracy. (Drucker, incidentally, was even more focused on civil society after Sept. 11, 2001.)


Read the full article here.

 

Photo credit:  by Jeff McNeill, Flickr.com CC

 

More about resources for leaders via Deb is here:
Planning & Strategy Retreats
Presentation Videos - Change Results
Deb's mothership: The REVELN website


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 6, 2012 9:28 AM
In any organization, there will always be leaders and followers. It is true that many people hate the fact that they are just simple followers, the main reason why they often time make nasty comments about these leaders.But, despite all these negative comments, a true leader should never be onion-skinned, and should stand firm on what he believes is right and advantageous for the majority, regardless of any negative opinions.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 10, 2012 9:54 AM
@Victoria, thanks for your comment. It is true that "leaders" must have thick skins. Drucker's point, I believe, is that followers define the leaders, and that leaders may, in many, even most cases be an artifact of management, rather than the magical status we've given them over the years.

Indeed, where would Gandi, Nelson Mandela, Washington and Lincoln be without their first followers and the followings that emerged to turn the tides of public opinion to make significant changes in our histories.

It's a provocative article and I'm glad that people are rescooping it. ~ Deb
Erika Holthuizen's comment, September 25, 2012 9:58 PM
golden truth
!
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Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | Nemetics | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.

 

On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.
1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.
3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 11:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:25 AM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!