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Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight

Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, March 24, 2014 2:25 PM


Lutz Finger, reports from SxSW on the topic of algorithms, curation and the future, as the skills of content creators, data analysts and code programmers are seemingly converging for the first time. 


Among others, he reports Steve Rosenbaum (founder of Magnify.net) significant own words at SxSW: "...a wise combination of human judgement enabled by algorithms will become the new king of content."


But while there are great new tools, startups and ideas leveraging the great potential of big data and human curation, there is a big, invisible danger, still looming on us.


"The danger is that any algorithm might fall prey to someone trying to influence it.

This might be the ones programming the algorithm or the users. We for instance saw governments trying to skew algorithms by introducing fake online personas (
Learn more about the US government persona-management software).
 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us.

If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."



Informative. Resourceful. 7/10



Full article: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140320132545-6074593-the-age-of-the-algorithms-sxsw-summary 


See also: www.masternewmedia.org/future-of-search


Image: Bjoern Ognibeni - SxSW




Georges Millet's curator insight, March 25, 2014 4:10 AM

Knowledge & life turning today into a (google) search. Algorithms are key!  

Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 26, 2014 4:35 AM

"We are in the era of the algorithm. They decide what news we will see, they decide which person is important and they will even merge more and more into our non-digital lives.

 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us. If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."

 

A reminder, then, that algorithm's should not take the place of critical thinking.

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Business Models for Journalism: Where The Real Opportunities Are

Business Models for Journalism: Where The Real Opportunities Are | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:46 AM



Vincenzo Marino does an excellent reporting job on the International Journalism Festival news site, by summarising and distilling the good stuff emerging from an interesting and sustained debate on Twitter (Business Models for Journalism - Storify) on the state of online journalism and its potential future business models, initially kicked off by entrepreneur and Netscape co-founder Marc Andreessen.


Among the highlights, what Andreessen calls “the most obvious eight business models” for now and the future:


1. Quality journalism for high-quality ads

2. 
Succeeding in making readers subscribe and pay for value products


3. Premium content worth buying


4. Relying on live conferences and events


5. Investing across multiple channels


6. Crowdfunding ("Gigantic opportunity especially for investigative journalism")


7. Offering the option to pay in Bitcoin for micropayments


8. Keeping an eye on philanthropy (like ProPublica and Pierre Omidyar's First Look Media)


One stratospherically important point to take home from this valuable roundup is the following: 


"The role played by quality, however, is crucial especially when analyzed in the light of the tendency of the market to expand, creating less accurate content.


The challenge is to make a product (or brand) a point of reference, a lighthouse in the night of uncontrolled content and viral hoaxes."



Informative. Resourceful. Insightful. 8/10


Original article: http://www.journalismfestival.com/news/state-of-the-media-and-possible-business-models/ by Vincenzo Marino 


Reading time: 12 mins.





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Most Important Thing in Content Curation: Adding Value - Here 14 Ways To Do It

Most Important Thing in Content Curation: Adding Value - Here 14 Ways To Do It | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it
Thinking of adding value should be the first stage in curation, PKM, or any professional online sharing.

Via Robin Good
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 10, 2014 11:53 AM

14 ways to add value when curating content

SyReach's curator insight, July 7, 2014 4:53 AM

SyReach Notes now offers a full coverage of personal KM needs: Seek with integrated watch module and search engines, Sense with note and article edition, linking and knowledge building. Share by email or publish to Scoop.it selected resources linked to your articles!

Joe Matthews's curator insight, September 29, 2014 3:01 PM

Really thought provoking

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Is Your Content Curation Truly Useful or Is It Just a Marketing Tactic?

Is Your Content Curation Truly Useful or Is It Just a Marketing Tactic? | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, October 18, 2013 8:16 AM



Here is the idea: "The drive for offering ‘more’ is not always the best path.


It does not always create something unique. It does not always better serve a target audience. It does not always differentiate you from the competition. It does not always offer something that can’t be found elsewhere. It does not always solve a problem, or fulfill a desire."


Collecting and regurgitating all of the news that "appear" to be relevant may not be such a great idea after all.


"With unlimited server space and free distribution, the temptation can be too great to share AS MUCH content as possible, with the theory that they are better serving the many sub-niches of their market. In other words, you may often see less curation, and more collection."

I don't know if I'd be so generous to label "collection" this uncontrolled regurgitation of content with little real vetting and verification (let alone curation), but Dan Blank, has an interesting story about curation and collectors that I woud not hesitate to recommend reading.


There are some good insights in it.


One of them rings like this: "...collecting behavior is to collect AS MUCH of something as possible, and not curate or edit their collection at all.


Indeed I see many supposed curators doing exactly this.

 

Because, as Dan writes correctly "...with unlimited bandwidth and free distribution channels with digital media, it can be sooooo tempting to post more and more content, aimed at more and more target markets.


Plus, the temptation to seem as large as possible, and to give Google as much content as possible to crawl for all of those searches."


But there's a lot more valuable stuff and insight to get by reading in full the original story (even if it was written in 2010).


Insightful. Truthful. 8/10


Full article: http://wegrowmedia.com/digital-publishing-curation-vs-collection-vs-experience/ 


(Image credit: Robin Good)




Thorsten Strauss's curator insight, October 19, 2013 4:43 AM

Good questions but I think digital curation has different dynamics and also purposes. What do you think?

Olinda Turner's curator insight, October 21, 2013 5:05 PM

Totally agree with the concept that sometimes less truly is more. One of the hardest skills to develop is to sort out what is truly important.

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The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion

The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

"News sources can't just give us the facts. They must tell us what those facts mean."


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Robin Good's curator insight, February 24, 2014 4:55 PM



Here's a refreshing look at the future of news that highlights the importance of going deeper into creating value for readers by providing more focus, relevance, context and opinion.

These are the characters that properly define what we now refer to as "curation" when it comes to content and news.


The following passages, extracted from the book, The News: A User's Manual, are by Alain de Botton, and have been excerpted from a lengthy article on The Week entitled "The Future of News".


"News organizations are coy about admitting that what they present us with each day are minuscule extracts of narratives whose true shape and logic can generally only emerge from a perspective of months or even years — and that it would hence often be wiser to hear the story in chapters rather than snatched sentences.


They [news organizations] are institutionally committed to implying that it is inevitably better to have a shaky and partial grasp of a subject this minute than to wait for a more secure and comprehensive understanding somewhere down the line.


...


We need news organizations to help our curiosity by signaling how their stories fit into the larger themes on which a sincere capacity for interest depends.


To grow interested in any piece of information, we need somewhere to "put" it, which means some way of connecting it to an issue we already know how to care about.


A section of the human brain might be pictured as a library in which information is shelved under certain fundamental categories. Most of what we hear about day to day easily signals where in the stacks it should go and gets immediately and unconsciously filed.


... the stranger or the smaller stories become, the harder the shelving process grows. What we colloquially call "feeling bored" is just the mind, acting out of a self-preserving reflex, ejecting information it has despaired of knowing where to place.


...We might need help in transporting such orphaned pieces of information to the stacks that would most appropriately reveal their logic.


...it is news organizations to take on some of this librarian's work. It is for them to give us a sense of the larger headings under which minor incidents belong."

 


The call for understanding how much greater value can be provided by curating news and information in depth, rather than by following the shallow, buzzy and viral path beaten by HuffPo, Buzzfeed and the rest of the gang, is clear.


But beyond context and depth, real value can only be added if we accept the fact that going beyond the classic "objective fact reporting", by adding opinion and bias in a transparent fashion, can actually provide greater value in many ways, as Alain de Botton clearly explains:


"Unfortunately for our levels of engagement, there is a prejudice at large within many news organizations that the most prestigious aspect of journalism is the dispassionate and neutral presentation of "facts."


...


The problem with facts is that there is nowadays no shortage of sound examples. The issue is not that we need more of them, but that we don't know what to do with the ones we have...


...But what do these things actually mean? How are they related to the central questions of political life? What can they help us to understand?


...The opposite of facts is bias. In serious journalistic quarters, bias has a very bad name. It is synonymous with malevolent agendas, lies, and authoritarian attempts to deny audiences the freedom to make up their own minds.


Yet we should perhaps be more generous toward bias.


In its pure form, a bias simply indicates a method of evaluating events that is guided by a coherent underlying thesis about human functioning and flourishing.


It is a pair of lenses that slide over reality and aim to bring it more clearly into focus.


Bias strives to explain what events mean and introduces a scale of values by which to judge ideas and events. It seems excessive to try to escape from bias per se; the task is rather to find ways to alight on its more reliable and fruitful examples. 


There are countless worthy lenses to slide between ourselves and the world." 


Overall, these ideas offer a truly refreshing look at the future of news and at the relevance that context and opinion could play in transforming this medium from a vehicle of mass distraction to one of focused learning and understanding for those interested. 



Must read. Rightful. Insightful. 9/10



Full article: http://theweek.com/article/index/256737/the-future-of-news 


Reading time: 10':20"






Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 25, 2014 2:36 PM

El futuro de las Noticias no es sobre los Hechos, sino sobre contexto, relevancia y opinión.

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 3, 2014 5:12 AM

 Intéressant 

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The Future of Music Revenues May Actually Not Be in Selling Music

The Future of Music Revenues May Actually Not Be in Selling Music | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

"Even as they have grown, streaming companies have encountered a stubborn problem: Music lovers will consume large amounts of music as long as it is free, but getting them to pay a monthly subscription has proved much more difficult."


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Robin Good's curator insight, December 14, 2013 9:14 AM



People are more than happy to sign-up for music streaming services, but when it comes to pay for access, very few feel it is something they want to do.


Pandora has for example 70 million users, but only 3 have decided to pay for the Premium version of the service.


While most industry players are attempting to have music fans pay for higher quality audio options and a no-ads experience, it is likely that the future of music monetization will not be anymore in direct music sales.


"Several analysts doubt that streaming companies can attract enough paying customers with only recorded music, citing a sharp drop in music sales over the past decade and abundant free music online. And they say it will be difficult for them to survive on advertising alone."

 

The key to survival for music producers, whether large or small, may be indeed elsewhere.


"...some see these companies’ success as lying in a so-called subsidy model, in which music sales support another business with higher margins.


Apple, most notably, used low-margin music sales to spur demand for iPods, phones and computers.


Music is an accompaniment, to add to your jog, your workday, your prep in the kitchen,” said James L. McQuivey, an analyst for Forrester Research. “But it’s not something you’re eager to pay for if you don’t have to.


The likely outcome is, as it is already happening, that monetization will come from everything that ranges from events, to merchandising and to collector's items. 


Informative. 7/10


Full article: http://www.kansascity.com/2013/12/13/4691034/a-stream-of-music-not-revenue.html 


(Image credit: Woman listening to streaming by ShutterStock)



Luke's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:10 PM

I think this will eventually succeed, once large online platforms like Beatport try it. It might take some time though.

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Content Curation: 13 Sense-Making Approaches To Add Value To Information

Content Curation: 13 Sense-Making Approaches To Add Value To Information | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Maria Persson's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:03 PM

This is definately something that anyone in the coming new century needs to learn how to do effectively.  Do we want regurgitation or depth of learning from knowledge gained?   I value, for example, how Scoop.it allows for the 'web interface' to be looked after, by them ,and the curation and learning happens with us!

 

Thanks for sharing this Robin Good!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:54 PM

Robin's insights always bring content to the next level!

Michelle Ockers's curator insight, June 30, 2014 5:00 PM

Article lists a range of ways to use sense-making to add value to curated content.

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The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum

The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum | Negocios&MarketingDigital | Scoop.it

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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:09 PM

Makes sense to me.

Julie Groom's curator insight, October 23, 2013 4:48 AM

Curating - how to manage it. And curation experts already exist - they're called Librarians!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:29 PM
The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum