Nebraska and National Consumer Protection
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Nebraska and National Consumer Protection
Consumer Protection including FDCPA and TCPA
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Lapin Law Offices' Blog: FDA: Recalls and OxyContin | April 1 - 17, 2013

Lapin Law Offices' Blog: FDA: Recalls and OxyContin | April 1 - 17, 2013 | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

BLOG POST: FDA: Recalls and OxyContin | April 1 - 17, 2013

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced several recalls and took actions regarding OxyContin for the period of April 1 through April 17, 2013. Consumers should make sure they are not using any of the recalled products. In addition, OxyContin users should be aware of these latest actions including banning the use and sale of generic OxyContin.

Read the full post: 
http://lapinlawoffices.blogspot.com/2013/04/FDA-Recalls-and-OxyContin-April-1-to-17-2013.html

 

#fda #fdarecalls #productrecalls #oxycontin

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Is Your Favorite Website Spying on You?

Is Your Favorite Website Spying on You? | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it

You know the rules to protecting your privacy online. You hold onto your passwords and login information, account numbers, social security number, and other identifying information.

Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Is Your Favorite Website Spying on You? [Infographic]

 

Very informative infographic about website tracking include who is doing it, how and how you can limit the information you give out.

 

By: StudyWeb[dot]com

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ABA Formal Opinion 469 - November 12, 2014

Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

The American Bar Association (ABA) issued Formal Opinion 469, which address an issue involving prosecutors and debt collectors.

The Opinion states:

A prosecutor who provides official letterhead of the prosecutor’s office to a debt collection company for use by that company to create a letter purporting to come from the prosecutor’s office that implicitly or explicitly threatens prosecution, when no lawyer from the prosecutor’s office reviews the case file to determine whether a crime has been committed and prosecution is warranted or reviews the letter to ensure it complies with the Rules of Professional Conduct, violates Model Rules 8.4(c) and 5.5(a)."

While not binding on any state, this seems like the correct decision. Debt collectors should not be able to deceive debtors using these type of tactics.
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Infograph | Buy a Photo Booth

Infograph | Buy a Photo Booth | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

12 Selfies That You Can’t Take Back [Infographic]

 

By: InstaPics

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Defendants in Massive Spam Text Message, Robocalling and Mobile Cramming Scheme to Pay $10 Million to Settle FTC Charges

Defendants in Massive Spam Text Message, Robocalling and Mobile Cramming Scheme to Pay $10 Million to Settle FTC Charges | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Defendants To Pay $10 Million For Trifecta of FTC Violations

 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced yesterday that several defendants will pay approximately $10 million to the FTC to settle charges related to offers of "free" gift cards from major retailers. The "trifecta" of FTC violations are: spam text messages; illegal robocalls; and mobile cramming.

 

As stated in the October 22, 2014, FTC Press Release:

 

"The settlement marks the completion of a major effort by the FTC to crack down on the senders of unwanted text messages offering consumers “free” gift cards to retailers such as Best Buy, Walmart and Target. The messages contained links to websites that led consumers through a process that the FTC alleges was designed to get consumers’ personal information for sale to marketers, their mobile phone numbers to cram unwanted charges on their bill, and to drive them to paid subscriptions for which the scammers received affiliate referral fees."

 

The settlements are being paid by three sets of defendants in different amounts.

 

Source: FTC: Defendants in Massive Spam Text Message, Robocalling and Mobile Cramming Scheme to Pay $10 Million to Settle FTC Charges

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David Slepkow's curator insight, January 6, 2015 12:48 AM

The first set of defendants is required to pay the FTC $7.8 million. The FTC alleged that this group of defendants was responsible for millions of illegal text messages, made deceptive claims about “free” merchandise, was responsible for unauthorized charges on mobile phone bills, and assisted and facilitated the sending of illegal robocalls. Under the terms of the settlement, these defendants will be banned from sending consumers unwanted text messages, as well as from placing charges of any kind onto a consumer’s telephone bill, whether landline or mobile. The settlement also bans the defendants from misrepresenting whether a product is free through a text message or webpage, and also requires the defendants to ensure that any affiliates working for them abide by the same provisions. In addition, the settlement requires the defendants to obtain consumers’ express informed consent before billing them and bans them from participating in illegal telemarketing. The defendants in this settlement are Acquinity Interactive, LLC; 7657030 Canada Inc., Garry Jonas, Gregory Van Horn, Revenue Path E-Consulting Pvt, Ltd.; Revenuepath Ltd.; and Sarita Somani.


The second set of defendants is required to pay the FTC $1.4 million. The FTC alleged that this set of defendants was responsible for cramming unauthorized charges on consumers’ mobile phone bills. Under the terms of the settlement, the defendants will be banned from placing charges of any kind on consumers’ telephone bills, as well as being banned from making any misrepresentations to consumers about a product or service, including the cost or a consumer’s obligation to pay. In addition, the defendants will be required to obtain consumers’ express informed consent before billing them for any good or service. The defendants in this settlement are Burton Katz, individually and also doing business as Polling Associates Inc. and Boomerang International, LLC, and Jonathan Smyth, individually and also doing business as Polling Associates Inc.


In the third settlement, an $8 million judgment is being suspended due to the defendants’ inability to pay, after they turn over available assets. The FTC alleged that this set of defendants was responsible for making millions of illegal robocalls. Under the settlement, the defendants are required to pay the FTC $100,000, as well as the surrender value of a life insurance policy and proceeds from the sale of: a 2013 Cadillac Escalade, two motorcycles, and a real estate holding in Southern California. The settlement also bans the defendants from illegally telemarketing consumers through robocalling. The defendants in this settlement are Firebrand Group S.L., LLC, Worldwide Commerce Associates, LLC, and Matthew Beucler.


important keywords: Distracted Driving,Drunk and Driving Accidents,Texting Driving

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Increase the chances of recovering your lost iPhone by enabling 'Send Last Location' in iOS 8

Increase the chances of recovering your lost iPhone by enabling 'Send Last Location' in iOS 8 | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
A new and potentially crucial feature in iOS 8 allows an iPhone or iPad to send out its last-known location just before the device's battery dies, increasing the chances that a user might be able to recover their lost Apple product.
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Useful new feature in iOS 8, "Send Last Location," which automatically sends your iOS device's last known location when the battery is critically low.

 

You can locate it in Settings > iCloud > Find My iPhone

 

Article by Neil Hughes via AppleInsider

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The Gyroscopes in Your Phone Could Let Apps Eavesdrop on Conversations

The Gyroscopes in Your Phone Could Let Apps Eavesdrop on Conversations | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
In the age of surveillance paranoia, most smartphone users know better than to give a random app or website permission to use their device’s microphone. But researchers have found there’s another, little-considered sensor in modern phones that can also listen in on their conversations. And it doesn’t even need to ask. In a presentation at…
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

New potential privacy concern with your smartphone: Phone gyroscopes might be able to allow apps to eavesdrop.

The gyroscope in phones, which are used to measure a phone's orientation, are sensitive enough to pick up some sound waves, which turns them into a crude microphone. 
 
Dan Boneh, a computer security professor at Stanford, summed the issue succinctly, "Whenever you grant anyone access to sensors on a device, you’re going to have unintended consequences." 
 
New potential privacy concern with your smartphone: Phone gyroscopes might be able to allow apps to eavesdrop. 
 
Essentially, the gyroscope in iOS and Android phones, which are used to measure a phone's orientation, are sensitive enough to pick up some sound waves, which turns them into a crude microphone, according to researchers. 
 
Dan Boneh, a computer security professor at Stanford, summed the issue succinctly, "Whenever you grant anyone access to sensors on a device, you’re going to have unintended consequences." 
 
Both iOS and Android devices use gyroscopes that can pick up sound vibrations. However, iOS limits the reading of the gyroscopes to 100 hertz, which makes audio spying much more difficult. Android devices are more vulnerable as they allows apps to read the sensor’s data at twice that speed. Google is likely aware of this issue. 
 
While it is believed that this using gyroscopes to eavesdrop has not been exploited yet, the potential is there. As speech recognition improves, these vulnerabilities become more of a threat. 
 
Google could make Android less vulnerable by limiting the frequency like Apple does. Another possibility, which phones have or are implemented, is limiting the gyroscope frequency and even its use on a system-wide or app-by-app basis. 
 
Article by: Andy Greenberg via Wired

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Your Self-Tracking Data Is At Risk

Your Self-Tracking Data Is At Risk | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Use an activity-tracking device, such as a fitness tracking band, or application? Users should be very cautious due to serious security issues as your data may not be safe. These tracking devices and applications contain a lot of personal, private information. According to Symantec, in a Report
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Security Concerns With Self-Tracking Devices

 

Use an activity device or application? If so, be very cautious when using a self-tracking device or application due to serious security issues as your data may not be safe according to a Report from Symantec.

 

Blog post by Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices

 

Read the full post: Your Self-Tracking Data Is At Risk (http://lapinlawoffices.com/lapin-law-offices-blog/your-self-tracking-data-is-at-risk)

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Jeffrey Lapin's curator insight, August 5, 2014 10:30 AM

Your Self-Tracking Data Is At Risk

 

Are you a part of the Quantified Self Movement, which is using technology to measure your activities to improve yourself?  According to Report from Symantec, users of tracking devices and applications need to be very concerned about security with these devices and applications. Symantec found major security issues with many devices and apps.

 

Blog post by Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices

 

Read the full post: Your Self-Tracking Data Is At Risk (http://lapinlawoffices.com/lapin-law-offices-blog/your-self-tracking-data-is-at-risk)

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Five settings every privacy-conscious iPhone owner should change

Five settings every privacy-conscious iPhone owner should change | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
The iPhone is a useful tool to manage your work and play, but it isn't perfect when it comes to privacy. There are a handful of settings that
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Five settings every privacy-conscious iPhone owner should change:

 

1. Enable Find My iPhone
2. Disable Microphone Access
3. Disable Safari Autofill
4. Use Private Browsing
5. Disable Frequent Locations

 

By: Kelly Hodgkins via TUAW

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Don’t Fall Foul of the Scammers: A Guide To Ransomware & Other Threats

Don’t Fall Foul of the Scammers: A Guide To Ransomware & Other Threats | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
There are people making millions from meddling with your computer. Every click and e-mail can bring you within reach of them. How do you protect yourself? By learning what techniques they use and what you can do about them. Here's your guide to ransomware and the other threats that you might encounter. Ransomware Ransomware is…
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Don’t Fall Foul of the Scammers: A Guide To Ransomware & Other Threats

 

"There are people making millions from meddling with your computer. Every click and e-mail can bring you within reach of them. How do you protect yourself? By learning what techniques they use and what you can do about them."

 

Article covers: Ransomware; Fake Tech Support Calls; Phishing; IoT Cyberattacks; Potentially Unwanted Applications; and Smartphone Threats

 

By: Guy McDowell via MakeUseOf

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The Dropbox Blog – Updating our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy and Dropbox for Business Agreement

The Dropbox Blog – Updating our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy and Dropbox for Business Agreement | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Dropbox is a free service that lets you bring your photos, docs, and videos anywhere and share them easily. Never email yourself a file again!
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Dropbox is updating its Terms of Service (TOS) to require mandatory arbitration in the event of a dispute. You can opt-out, which I believe must be done by March 24, 2014, the date the new TOS go into effect. You can opt-out here: https://www.dropbox.com/arbitration_optout.

 

Read the entire post about the TOS and Privacy Policy changes by Ramsey Homsany on the Dropbox blog

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How to Protect Your Privacy on Your Mobile Devices

How to Protect Your Privacy on Your Mobile Devices | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
We use our mobile devices everywhere and for everything. Yet we rarely pay much mind to security. Use this guide to protect yourself and your important data on mobile.
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

10 ways to protect your privacy on mobile devices:

 

1. Use a Passcode
2. Be Selective With Your Apps
3. Don’t Click on Suspicious Links
4. Enable Remote Wiping
5. Keep Software Up to Date
6. Use Security Applications
7. Stay Off of Open Wi-Fi Networks
8. Write Down Your IMEI
9. Back Up Your Phone Regularly
10. Guard the Data on Your Sim Card

 

Many of these tips could apply to laptop computers as well.

 

By: Rob Toledo via Lifehack

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Robbins & Associates's curator insight, March 8, 2014 11:17 PM

Thanks to +Jeff Lapin, noted Ne. Personal Injury attorney who tells us how to keep children safe on the internet with pass codes.

 

robbinslaw.com

Atlanta

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Facebook User Privacy Habits [Infographic]

Facebook User Privacy Habits [Infographic] | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
The detailed infographic shows how Facebook users are still leaving vital information exposed.
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Facebook User Privacy Habits [Infographic]

 

50% of Facebook users surveyed have yet to use the “view as” feature when checking their privacy settings. Are you one of them?

 

By: NextAdvisor via Inside Facebook

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Jeffrey Lapin's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:39 PM

Facebook User Privacy Habits [Infographic]

 

50% of Facebook users surveyed have yet to use the “view as” feature when checking their privacy settings. Are you one of them?

 

By: NextAdvisor via Inside Facebook

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New Research: Some Tough Questions for ‘Security Questions’

New Research: Some Tough Questions for ‘Security Questions’ | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

New Research: Some Tough Questions for 'Security Questions'

 

Findings: "Secret questions are neither secure nor reliable enough to be used as a standalone account recovery mechanism. That's because they suffer from a fundamental flaw: their answers are either somewhat secure or easy to remember—but rarely both."

 

By: Elie Bursztein, Anti-Abuse Research Lead and Ilan Caron, Software Engineer (via Google Online Security Blog)

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Lawyer Jeffrey Lapin Tells How to Stop Bad Debt Collectors | PersonalInjury.com

Lawyer Jeffrey Lapin Tells How to Stop Bad Debt Collectors | PersonalInjury.com | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Attorney Jeffrey Lapin of Lincoln, South Dakota, is the operator of the StopBadCollectors.com website. In this PersonalInjury.com interview, Jeffrey exposes abusive debt collection tactics and explains the rights consumers have.
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Jeffrey Lapin was interviewed by Larry Bodine, Editor in Chief of PersonalInjury.com, regarding abusive debt collection tactics as well as the rights consumers have regarding debt collection.

 

Watch the video:http://www.personalinjury.com/blog/lawyer-jeffrey-lapin-tells-how-stop-bad-debt-collectors

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Lapin Law Offices' Blogger Blog: "Secure" Messaging Not As Protected As You Might Think

Lapin Law Offices' Blogger Blog: "Secure" Messaging Not As Protected As You Might Think | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it

By: Jeffrey Lapin on Lapin Law Offices’ Blogger Blog

Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) created a Scorecard to measure the actual security of “secure messaging” tools and apps. None of the popular messaging apps received a perfect score and some received a very low grade. Apple’s FaceTime and iMessage had some of the higher scores among the popular apps. The EFF’s results may be very surprising to some who thought their messages were very secure.

 

Read the full post by Jeffrey Lapin on Lapin Law Offices’ Blogger Blog: “Secure” Messaging Not As Protected As You Might Think (http://lapinlawoffices.blogspot.com/2014/11/secure-messaging-not-as-protected-as-you-might-think.html)

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Jeffrey Lapin's curator insight, November 7, 2014 10:48 AM

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) created a Scorecard to measure the actual security of “secure messaging” tools and apps. None of the popular messaging apps received a perfect score and some received a very low grade. Apple’s FaceTime and iMessage had some of the higher scores among the popular apps. The EFF’s results may be very surprising to some who thought their messages were very secure.

 

Read the full post by Jeffrey Lapin on Lapin Law Offices’ Blogger Blog: “Secure” Messaging Not As Protected As You Might Think (http://lapinlawoffices.blogspot.com/2014/11/secure-messaging-not-as-protected-as-you-might-think.html)

David Slepkow's curator insight, January 6, 2015 12:42 AM
Using the 7 criteria, either a green checkmark or a red "no" symbol was placed on the Scorecard.
Only six apps received all green checkmarks: ChatSecure; CryptoCat; Signal/Redphone; Silent Phone; Silent Text; and TextSecure.
The EFF Scorecard results for some of the more popular messaging apps and tools:
  • Apple FaceTime: 5 green checkmarks
  • Apple iMessage: 5 green checkmarks 
  • Facebook chat: 2 green checkmarks 
  • Google Hangouts: 2 green checkmarks 
  • Skype: 2 green checkmarks 
  • SnapChat: 2 green checkmarks 
  • WhatsApp: 2 green checkmarks 
  • AIM: 1 green checkmark 
  • Kik Messenger: 1 green checkmark 
  • Yahoo! Messenger: 1 green checkmark
These scores may be surprising to some who thought their messages were more secure.

The EFF is quick to point out that the scorecard results “should not be read as endorsements of individual tools or guarantees of their security” and that closer examinations of many of the apps and tools will be conducted later.


important keywords: Distracted Driving,Drunk and Driving Accidents,Texting Driving

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Infographic: How Secure is your Cloud?

Infographic: How Secure is your Cloud? | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it

How Secure Is Your Cloud? [Infographic]

By: Alan McMahon - Tech Page One (Dell)

Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

How Secure Is Your Cloud? [Infographic]

 

By: Alan McMahon - Tech Page One (Dell)

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Lapin Law Offices' Blogger Blog: Phishing Scams - How To Warn People

Lapin Law Offices' Blogger Blog: Phishing Scams - How To Warn People | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it

Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices

Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Phishing Scams - How To Warn People

 

Email phishing scams are both a problem of technology and psychology. How people should be warned so they protect themselves is being studied.

 

Despite the temptation of a promised, highly prized reward, always remember if something seems too good to be true, it usually is. There is very little in life that is free.

 

Post by Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices

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Jeffrey Lapin's curator insight, October 21, 2014 11:54 AM

Phishing Scams - How To Warn People

 

Email phishing scams are both a problem of technology and psychology. How people should be warned so they protect themselves is being studied.

 

Despite the temptation of a promised, highly prized reward, always remember if something seems too good to be true, it usually is. There is very little in life that is free.

 

Post by Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices

David Slepkow's curator insight, January 6, 2015 12:50 AM
A recent article in Consumer Affairs by Mark Huffman, "Why you might fall for a phishing scam" describes some of the problems there are in trying to warn people about phishing scams:

Information is power and, when it comes to the criminal underground, it might as well be gold. Scammers who pick up chunks of information about you can quickly pick your pocket.


An effective phishing scam almost always involves trickery and deception. A message in your email inbox is not what it first appears. ...


The challenge, then, is to find a way to identify these bogus pitches/threats and warn consumers before they make a costly error in judgment.

Two professors at the University of Alabama in Huntsville are studying phishing scams to determine the best way to help protect people from them:

The researchers say your response to a [phishing scam] warning is based on the strength of the authority issuing it. In addition, you have to understand it, remember it, change your attitude and be motivated enough to change your behavior. ...


important keywords: RI personal injury accident , RI personal injury lawyer, car accidents in Rhode island

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Five Things Google Probably Knows About You

Five Things Google Probably Knows About You | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
The majority of us use Google. It opens up the Internet, lets us explore and learn. It helps us expand our minds. And in return, it's collected information about you. That much, we know. It's common knowledge. A phrase that has quite recently become everyday is: "If you're not paying for the product, you are…
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

Five Things Google Probably Knows About You

 

by Philip Bates via MakeUseOf

 

The 5 things listed in the article are:

 

Demographic information: gender and age
Your interests
Your IP address, which may be where you live
What's in your Gmail
When you use the internet

 

Depending on your settings and whether you use Google products, such as Google+, Google might know a lot more.

 

Should you care that Google knows these things? Probably not except for Gmail, which should never be used for confidential or private emails anyway.

 

You can limit some of the things Google knows about you by changing some of your Google and browser settings. The article suggests not using Google for search as some other search engines do not track you. However, the only way to be completely anonymous online is to stay off the internet.

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Foursquare app tracks your location by default whenever your phone is on

Foursquare app tracks your location by default whenever your phone is on | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it

The new Foursquare app automatically tracks your location by default. If this is not something you want you can opt-out by turning off Location Services.

Post by John Zorabedian via Naked Security from Sophos

Foursquare, makers of the popular app that lets you "check in" wherever you go, unveiled a new version this week that tracks your location even when the app is closed, with opt-in as the default.
...
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

The new Foursquare app automatically tracks your location by default. If this is not something you want you can opt-out by turning off Location Services.

 

Post by John Zorabedian via Naked Security from Sophos

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10 Things You Didn't Know You Agreed to via Terms of Service

10 Things You Didn't Know You Agreed to via Terms of Service | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
We know you didn't read the terms of service. Here are the most interesting parts you missed.
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

10 things you did not know you agreed to via Terms of Service on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn. 

 

Facebook: 

1. Facebook has permission to use your photos and videos for whatever it wants. 

2. You can't use Facebook if you're a convicted sex offender. 

3. You're required to keep your contact information up to date. 

 

Twitter:

4. How you explore Twitter, and how you got there 

5. You're not allowed to squat on a username. 

 

Instagram: 

6. You're not allowed to post sexually suggestive content. 

7. You're not supposed to send ideas to Instagram, but if the company actually reads them and likes them, it'll use them. 

 

LinkedIn: 

8. You can't add anyone you don't actually know. 

9. Your profile can't promote escort or prostitution services — even if they're legal where you live. 

10. You're not allowed to lie. 

 

Some of these seem like common sense but, unless you actually read the TOS, which you should but probably have not, you do not know what you have agreed to when using these sites. These types of things are not just limited to these sites.

 

Any other "odd" things you know of? 

 

My Advice: Read the Terms of Service of any site you use. 

 

Post by Sylvan Lane via Mashable

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BBB's Top Five Summer Scams

BBB's Top Five Summer Scams | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

The Better Business Bureau (BBB), which serves Nebraska, South Dakota, The Kansas Plains and Southwest Iowa, released its Top Five Summer Scams, including what they are and how to protect yourself.

 

The top 5 summer scams the BBB identified are:
> Vacation Scams (Don’t let a scam ruin your vacation)
> Moving Scam (Keep your belongings safe during your move)
> Concert Ticket Scams (Beware of summer concert ticket scams)
> Door-to-Door Scams (Be wary of high pressure door-to-door sales tactics)
> Job Scams (Beware of job scams that can turn a hot summer cold)

 

If you feel uneasy about something or it seems to good to be true it might very well be a scam. There are a lot of resources available to consumers to help them make sure something is not a scam. These include: lawyers; BBB; local, state and federal agencies; and Google searches.

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200 million consumer records left exposed in Experian security oversight

200 million consumer records left exposed in Experian security oversight | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Smooth words and a fake identity gave one man the power to compromise millions of private financial records belonging to U.S. consumers.
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

200 million consumer records left exposed in Experian security oversight

 

Summary: Smooth words and a fake identity gave one man the power to compromise millions of private financial records belonging to U.S. consumers.

 

Post and summary by Charlie Osborne / ZDNet

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Court Finds Telemarketers in Contempt; Imposes $14.75 Million Judgment

Court Finds Telemarketers in Contempt; Imposes $14.75 Million Judgment | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that a Florida U.S. District Court issued a contempt order against Byron Wolf and Roy Eliasson for continuing to operate a scheme defrauding consumers, which was in violation of a a 2008 permanent injunction. This contempt order requires the pair to pay $14.75 million, which is the amount they illegally took from consumers.  

 

After a hearing, the Florida court found that these two individuals had "Sent messages to consumers communicating they had been 'approved' for a loan, none of them ever received a loan. Instead, many of their bank accounts were debited $49.95 or more a month after they provided their financial information to the defendants." 

 

Source: FTC Press Release (January 31, 2014) 

 

By: Jeffrey Lapin of Lapin Law Offices

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David Slepkow's curator insight, January 6, 2015 2:27 AM

In 2008, 14 defendants agreed to an order settling the FTC’s charges, and were required to pay more than $16 million to provide refunds to defrauded consumers. Bryon Wolf and Roy Eliasson were ordered to pay over $11 million for their role in the scheme, and were barred from a variety of unlawful acts in the future, including misrepresenting material facts regarding an offer, failing to clearly disclose material terms during a sale, and debiting consumers’ accounts without their consent.


But according to the FTC’s motion for contempt, within months of the 2008 order, Wolf and Eliasson devised a new plan to defraud consumers through Membership Services, LLC, a firm they controlled. In this scheme, they used deceptive phone and internet solicitations to target recent loan applicants and misled them into believing they would provide them with cash advances, loans, or lines of credit. Instead, the defendants debited the consumers’ accounts for membership in a continuity program. Very few consumers used the program, and many cancelled when they found out the defendants had debited their accounts and planned to take additional payments from them in future months.


Based on this conduct, following a two day evidentiary hearing, the court found that the defendants had violated the terms of a court-ordered permanent injunction by engaging in some of the same kinds of deceptive tactics that led to the FTC’s prior case against them.

According to the court, while the defendants sent messages to consumers communicating they had been “approved” for a loan, none of them ever received a loan. Instead, many of their bank accounts were debited $49.95 or more a month after they provided their financial information to the defendants.


important keywords: RI personal injury accident , RI personal injury lawyer, car accidents in Rhode island

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FDA Asks Doctors and Pharmacists To Limit Acetaminophen

FDA Asks Doctors and Pharmacists To Limit Acetaminophen | Nebraska and National Consumer Protection | Scoop.it
In January of 2011 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had asked drug manufacturers to limit the amount of acetaminophen to no more than 325 mg in each tablet or capsule by January 14, 2014. While more than 50% of manufacturers complied with this request, there were many who did not. Because of
Jeffrey Lapin's insight:

FDA Wants 325mg Acetaminophen Limit

 

On January 14, 2014, the FDA asked health care professionals to stop prescribing dosages of medication that exceed 325 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen and to help prevent, in most situations, a patient from receiving more.

 

Read more by Jeffrey Lapin on Lapin Law Offices’ website blog: FDA Asks Doctors and Pharmacists To Limit Acetaminophen (http://lapinlawoffices.com/lapin-law-offices-blog/fda-asks-doctors-and-pharmacists-to-limit-acetaminophen)

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Jeffrey Lapin's curator insight, January 29, 2014 4:38 PM

FDA Wants 325mg Acetaminophen Limit

 

On January 14, 2014, the FDA asked health care professionals to stop prescribing dosages of medication that exceed 325 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen and to help prevent, in most situations, a patient from receiving more.

 

Read more by Jeffrey Lapin on Lapin Law Offices’ website blog: FDA Asks Doctors and Pharmacists To Limit Acetaminophen (http://lapinlawoffices.com/lapin-law-offices-blog/fda-asks-doctors-and-pharmacists-to-limit-acetaminophen)

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