Near Future Technology
50 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ben Raynes
Scoop.it!

Manufacturing, transport and medical industries set to be revolutionised by 3D printing

Manufacturing, transport and medical industries set to be revolutionised by 3D printing | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
THEY’RE like something from a science fiction novel — specialised machines that can create anything from fighter jets to living organs with the push of the button.
Ben Raynes's insight:

An interesting point this article makes is that

"traditional manufacturing is “subtractive” in that objects are cut away from a lump of raw material, 3D printing is “additive” as digital files sent to a printer build an object layer by layer." The only limitation is how the machines will cope with the materials.

If 3D printing eventually does become widespread, it will disrupt transport, shipping and logistics in a big way. It is “entirely feasible and entirely practical that people will simply send files rather than ship products overseas".

Another grey area is intellectual property rights. With everyone having the potential to create objects and products in their own home, the general consensus is that a marketplace of templates and designs (similar to iTunes) will be the best way to manage the concerns.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ben Raynes
Scoop.it!

Artificial graphene could outperform the real thing

Artificial graphene could outperform the real thing | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
Graphene is truly a 21st-century wonder material, finding use in everything from
solar cells to batteries to tiny antennas. Now, however, a group of Europ...
Ben Raynes's insight:

Arranging semiconductor crystals using the blueprint of graphene as the structural basis creates a material even stronger than graphene itself, plus it can be tweaked to perform differently and exhibit certain characteristics for specific applications.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben Raynes from Breakthrough Innovation
Scoop.it!

On the Road in Mobileye’s Self-Driving Car

On the Road in Mobileye’s Self-Driving Car | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
By blending advanced computer vision techniques with low-cost video cameras, the Israeli company Mobileye is demonstrating how quickly autonomous driving can be commercialized.

Via António Antunes
Ben Raynes's insight:

This self-driving car aims to compete with Google's, and uses an alternative navigation method. While it is easily outperformed by Google's Prius (which uses a radar system called Velodyne LIDAR), the Audi is an example of camera-only autonomous driving, and is remarkably cheaper than Google's offering.

more...
António Antunes's curator insight, May 29, 2013 4:01 PM
Low-cost self-driving cars expected by 2016
Rescooped by Ben Raynes from Driving Lessons
Scoop.it!

Self-Driving Car Test: Steve Mahan

Google's self-driving car


Via Michele Cummins, Drive2us
Ben Raynes's insight:

Quite astounding how seamlessly this car navigates its environment.

Regarding the technology as a whole, there are some who believe that a self-driving vehicle will never be completely standard due to trust issues, and also that it is an example of technology once again taking away a human skill or trade. Despite these concerns, this video shows that for at least a small portion of the community, this technology will be revolutionary.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben Raynes from HMD
Scoop.it!

Voice Recognition and Eye Tracking Technology Will Make Touch Screens Obsolete, According to Intel Exec | One Click Root

Voice Recognition and Eye Tracking Technology Will Make Touch Screens Obsolete, According to Intel Exec | One Click Root | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
RT @king_solomo Voice Recognition and Eye Tracking Technology Will Make Touch Screens Obsolete at http://t.co/Fhtz3pwS http://t.co/gU9FsBtN

Via Alex Andres
Ben Raynes's insight:

Touch screens are the predominant form of user interface for mobile devices at this point. But as the article says, voice is the best form of communication between humans. If voice recognition technology becomes advanced enough and has a rich vocabulary to draw from and also interpret, voice commands would be the most natural form of user-computer interaction.

Voice commands can be socially awkward though in certain situations, so eye tracking technology has been proposed by Intel as a compliment to voice.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben Raynes from RFID
Scoop.it!

7 Unexpected and Awesome Uses of RFID Tags

7 Unexpected and Awesome Uses of RFID Tags | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
Think of RFID tags as technology just for the warehouse? Think again. Businesses are leveraging radio frequency identification technology to capitalize on all sorts of efficiencies and opportunities.

Via AbleID Ltd
Ben Raynes's insight:

RFID technology is already in widespread use, but continued development is leading to an even greater number of potential commercial and private uses. Information gathering, tracking and monitoring, and processing efficiencies are just some of the benefits that RFID tags have provided, with many more application to follow.

more...
AbleID Ltd's curator insight, February 13, 2014 8:42 AM

A nice article regarding the use of RFID within applications, just a few of the many types of applications which RFID can be used.

Rescooped by Ben Raynes from RFID Tags
Scoop.it!

MIT Students Design 'Sesame Ring’ to Replace Boston Transit Cards

MIT Students Design 'Sesame Ring’ to Replace Boston Transit Cards | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
Two undergraduates from MIT are looking to revolutionize transport with a ring that replaces transit cards.

Via AbleID Ltd
more...
AbleID Ltd's curator insight, February 21, 2014 12:11 PM

Another Great RFID Idea! Well done MIT Students, The new RFID Enabled Sesame Ring.

Rescooped by Ben Raynes from WordPress Google SEO and Social Media
Scoop.it!

How Long Till The Revolution of 3D Printing? – infographic /@BerriePelser

How Long Till The Revolution of 3D Printing? – infographic /@BerriePelser | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
How Long Till The Revolution of 3D Printing? – infographic 3D printing has slowly started

Via WordPress SEO & Social Media
Ben Raynes's insight:

A neat graphic using the adoption rates of the PC as a template for the trajectory of the 3D printer. If we were to believe this, we would currently be in an age of 'Innovators/Early Adopters' and would not reach the 1:1 3D Printer per person ratio until 2040.

more...
WordPress SEO & Social Media's curator insight, March 14, 2013 12:05 PM

How Long Till The Revolution of 3D Printing? – infographic /@BerriePelser

Cameron Blanks's curator insight, March 27, 2014 7:42 AM

While not a scholarly source, this info graphic still offers some interesting insights into the future of 3D printing, with sources to some more reliable websites such as Forbes and the government census. Some of the more significant things this graphic shows, that will need to be considered for those working with 3D printers is the need to protect the individuals and companies from product and design theft, as the current laws do not offer a full realistic protection from copyright theft so it will be up to IT department to secure and maintain the systems behind the 3D printing, to keep these designs in the companies hand. The graphic also offers some intriguing comparisons between the prediction of the stage in which 3D printers are currently adopted in society and that of the revolutionary growth we saw with personal computers. These two may well play out in a similar way, as  amazing developments are being made every day and the importance of 3D printers in our societies future increases, we may well see this comparison between the two come true, and experience another enormous growth similar to that once seen by the computer.

Scooped by Ben Raynes
Scoop.it!

9 Incredible Uses for Graphene

9 Incredible Uses for Graphene | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
Graphene is amazing. Or at least, it could be. Made from a layer of carbon one-atom thick, it's the strongest material in the world, it's completely flexible, and it's more conductive than copper. Discovered just under a decade ago, the supermaterial potentially has some unbelievable applications for us in the not so distant future.
Ben Raynes's insight:

We're clearly still a few years before actual graphene products are on shelves, as there's a lot to figure out about how graphene can be applied properly. Even then it still need to be mass produced at an economically affordable level. The potential for how this could change electronics and plenty of other as-yet-unknown applications is incredible though.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ben Raynes from Automated Vehicle Insights Selected for You by CATES
Scoop.it!

Will You Ever Be Able To Afford A Self-Driving Car?

Will You Ever Be Able To Afford A Self-Driving Car? | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
Proponents of self-driving cars are sure theyll help save the planet and empower large groups of people with the freedom of mobility. But will the...

Via John Niles
Ben Raynes's insight:

"The staid-looking Toyota Prius Mahan “drove” around in the video costs more than a Ferrari 599. At $320,000, that’s an exclusive purchase."

 

"IHS Automotive forecasts that the price for the self-driving technology will add between $7,000 and $10,000 to a car’s sticker price in 2025, a figure that will drop to around $5,000 in 2030 and about $3,000 in 2035, the year when the report says most self-driving vehicles will be operated completely independent from a human occupant’s control."

 

The integration of self-driving vehicles is inevitable. Before the idea becomes reality though there are big obstacles to overcome regarding efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

 

more...
John Niles's curator insight, February 1, 2014 3:09 PM

Well done reporting on development paths for self-driving cars.  First two comments underneath are also sharp. 

One interesting quote:  "The consensus in the automobile industry is that Google’s idealistic approach to the driverless car won't bring the price of these technologies down far enough in price to make its car a mass-market proposition. So most outfits are working on less exotic but much cheaper approaches to the driverless problem: They’re looking at ways to consolidate and simplify the hardware."

Rescooped by Ben Raynes from Transportation for the Future
Scoop.it!

DNews: Teen Invents Affordable Self-Driving Car : DNews

DNews: Teen Invents Affordable Self-Driving Car : DNews | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
A Romanian teen is giving Google a run for its money by inventing an affordable self-driving car. The invention has already won him a major prize from Intel.

Via Cynthia Pols
more...
Cynthia Pols's curator insight, July 14, 2013 10:28 PM

Rumanian teenager develops low-cost self-driving car . . 

Rescooped by Ben Raynes from Language Technology
Scoop.it!

Future Australian passports may incorporate voice recognition and eye-scanning ... - NEWS.com.au

Future Australian passports may incorporate voice recognition and eye-scanning ... - NEWS.com.au | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
Future Australian passports may incorporate voice recognition and eye-scanning ...
NEWS.com.au
AUSTRALIAN passports may incorporate voice-recognition and eye-scanning technology as the government looks to expand biometric identification.

Via Natural Language Careers
Ben Raynes's insight:

This is a great example of voice and eye recognition being used for security purposes rather than for entertainment or interaction purposes. The Australian and New Zealand passports already utilise facial recognition and embedded smart chip technology. This development will add another layer of security, and may also streamline the customs process for travellers.

 

more...
Natural Language Careers's curator insight, November 26, 2013 5:41 AM

Voice Biometrics is on our hotlist for 2014....lots of stuff in the pipeline!

Rescooped by Ben Raynes from Good Books To Read
Scoop.it!

What is NFC and RFID

What is RFID
- Imagine you’re sitting on your porch at night. You turn on the porch light, and you ...

Via everyday1ebook
Ben Raynes's insight:

This is a great analogy to explain the differences between RFID, which is currently in widespread use, and NFC, which is in its infancy. Both technologies operate using the same concept, but have differing abilities. RFID is a one-way connection that has a reach of no more than 200 meters, but can only send under 1000 bytes to its recipient.
NFC has a shorter range (about 10cm) but can exchange a greater amount of information, and can transmit the info both ways. This is the defining difference and will lead to simple, efficient and most importantly intuitive applications.

more...
everyday1ebook's curator insight, February 17, 2014 9:36 PM

NFC is designed to build on RFID by enabling more complex exchanges between participants. You can still read passive RFID tags with an NFC reader and you can write to their limited amount of memory. NFC also allows you to write data to certain types of RFID tags using a standard format, independent of tag type. You can also communicate with other NFC devices in a two-way, or duplex, exchange. NFC devices can exchange information about each other’s capabilities, swap records and initiate longer term communications through other means.

Rescooped by Ben Raynes from RFID Solutions
Scoop.it!

RFID Bikealarm - Dennis Siegel

RFID Bikealarm - Dennis Siegel | Near Future Technology | Scoop.it
RFID Bikealarm features omnidirectional movement sensing and detection of tiny motions to prevent a bike form being carried away or part dismounting theft.

Via AbleID Ltd
Ben Raynes's insight:

A really simple idea for a bicycle security alarm. Featuring a small form-factor that is nestled under the seat, it is activated and deactivated using RFID. It can sense movement of the bike and when detected emits a piercing noise to alert anyone in the surroundings. This could easily be applied to other scenarios and situations where a discreet security solution is desired.

more...
AbleID Ltd's curator insight, March 7, 2014 11:30 AM

RFID Bike alarm