Nazi Book Burnings
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Nazi Book Burnings
7th grade Holocaust Unit Resources
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Researcher's mission to show Nazis' silencing of music during Holocaust - Los Angeles Times

Researcher's mission to show Nazis' silencing of music during Holocaust - Los Angeles Times | Nazi Book Burnings | Scoop.it
Researcher's mission to show Nazis' silencing of music during Holocaust
Los Angeles Times
Nazi crimes against visual art are easy to grasp. We can see images of paintings they stole.
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Nazi book burnings - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Nazi book burnings were a campaign conducted by the German Student Association of Nazi Germany to ceremonially burn books in Germany and Austria by classical liberal, anarchist, socialist, pacifist, communist, Jewish, and other authors whose writings were viewed as subversive or whose ideologies undermined the National Socialist administration.

On April 6th, 1933, the Main Office for Press and Propaganda of the German Student Association proclaimed a nationwide "Action against the Un-German Spirit", which was to climax in a literary purge or "cleansing" ("Säuberung") by fire. Local chapters were to supply the press with releases and commissioned articles, sponsor well-known Nazi figures to speak at public gatherings, and negotiate for radio broadcast time. On the 8th of April, the Students Association also drafted the Twelve Theses which deliberately evoked Martin Luther and the historic burning of "Un-German" books at the Wartburg festival on the 300th anniversary of the posting of Luther's Ninety-Five Theses. The theses called for a "pure" national language and culture. Placards publicized the theses, which attacked "Jewish intellectualism", asserted the need to "purify" German language and literature, and demanded that universities be centres of German nationalism. The students described the "action" as a response to a worldwide Jewish "smear campaign" against Germany and an affirmation of traditional German values.

In a symbolic act of ominous significance, on 10 May 1933, the students burned upwards of 25,000 volumes of "un-German" books, presaging an era of state censorship and control of culture. On the night of 10 May, in most university towns, nationalist students marched in torchlight parades "against the un-German spirit." The scripted rituals called for high Nazi officials, professors, rectors, and student leaders to address the participants and spectators. At the meeting places, students threw the pillaged and unwanted books into the bonfires with great joyous ceremony, band-playing, songs, "fire oaths," and incantations. In Berlin, some 40,000 people gathered in the Opernplatz to hear Joseph Goebbels deliver a fiery address: "No to decadence and moral corruption!" Goebbels enjoined the crowd. “Yes to decency and morality in family and state! I consign to the flames the writings of Heinrich Mann, Ernst Gläser, Erich Kästner.”

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Annual 2 Chapter 05 - Simon Wiesenthal Center Multimedia Learning Center

Simon Wiesenthal Center Multimedia Learning Center Online
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The History Place - World War II in Europe Timeline: May 10, 1933 - Nazis Burn Books in Germany

The History Place - World War II in Europe Timeline: May 10, 1933 - Nazis Burn Books in Germany | Nazi Book Burnings | Scoop.it
At The History Place - Part of the World Two Timeline.
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