Navigate
3.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Navigate
Explore places, objects and phenomenons.
Curated by Suvi Salo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Maps bring the horror of Hiroshima home -- literally.  

Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology, created a NukeMap that allows you to visualize what the Hiroshima and Nagasaki explosions would look like in your hometown. Kuang Keng Kuek Ser at Public Radio International has also developed a version, using slightly different estimates.

Here is what Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb, would look like on Wellerstein's map if detonated in New York City."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:12 AM

The NukeMap allows you to set different determinations such as bomb size, etc, as well.  

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 2015 11:53 AM

Human Nature!

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:48 AM

I highly suggest tinkering around with "NukeMap," as I have spent the last 30 minutes seeing how different bombs would destroy my neighborhood and the surrounding areas- it will even adjust for varying casualty rates in areas with higher or lower populations, even just by moving the detonation site a couple of streets away. It's pretty cool at the surface, but to examine the destructive capabilities of some of these weapons is downright terrifying. You view the blast radius encompassing your home, your entire existence, on a computer screen, and its easy to forget the devastation of it all disappearing. For those who survived the atomic bombs dropped at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no simulation to tinker with, but instead a reality more terrible than anything I've ever had to endure in my own personal life. Thousands of lives lost, thousands more left irreversibly shattered, never to be the same again. All because men in government buildings on opposite sides of the ocean couldn't get along. No one wins in war.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

Infographic World War I 1914-1918 | Infographics Creator

Infographic World War I 1914-1918 | Infographics Creator | Navigate | Scoop.it
Infographic World War I 1914-1918 Borders, state leaders and military alliances In 1914, the long-established world order began to crack apart, the 19th century system came to an end, and humankind entered a new age of unprecedentedly brutal conflicts in terms of their scale, the number of casualties and destruction. Russia entered this war as an empire with a huge economic potential, expanding industrial production and confidence in its political influence. But Russia lost the war,the Tsar abdicated, the economy was ruined, and the fire of a Civil War swept through the country. After losing four extremely influential empires, the European and global political mosaic reassembled into a new and extremely fragile world order, which inevitably led to World War II. en.ria.ru

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Navigate | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:06 PM

Whenever there is war, Americans want maps.  They want to know about where conflict is, how far away from home it is, and why people are being sent to the places they are being sent.  With the new map ideas in World War II from Harrison maps were made to better display distance and direction to people.  He used different projections in areas.  He also drew maps from different places, for example what does Japan look like when you are in Siberia.  Transforming flat maps back to having some sort of global shape was exactly what we needed to get away from the old outdated unreliable style of maps.