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Curated by Suvi Salo
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Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Cartograms of the Olympic Games

Cartograms of the Olympic Games | Navigate | Scoop.it
The distribution of medals shows the existing Olympic inequalities: The overall patterns are a reflection of wealth distribution in the world, raising the question whether money can buy sporting success. Besides investment in sports by those countries who can afford it, the medal tables also reflect a battle for global supremacy in political terms.

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, mapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 15, 2016 8:32 PM
Another very interesting way to present geographic data.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Classical Music News
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8 of the best classical music pieces about sport | Classical-Music.com

8 of the best classical music pieces about sport | Classical-Music.com | Navigate | Scoop.it
  Sport Relief kicked off today and to mark the occasion (as well as donating to the great cause) we have selected our favourite pieces of music about sport.

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Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | Navigate | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


Via Seth Dixon, Karen Moles Rose, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:19 AM

Why do Indians love Cricket? As with most modern day countries, colonialism has something to do with it. However, the British never intended to promote Cricket in India. It was the local elite of India that first pushed to incorporate the game into Indian culture. Desperate to gain the prestige that the British attached to the game, the elite began the practice of playing Cricket in India. In the years following independence, the game has spread to the other classes of Indian society. The game has become the national pastime for the nation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:52 AM

this is an interesting reason for a game to spread. it was a game played by the elite, so it never really lost the appeal of being a sport of the rich.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:30 PM

i have tried to watch a cricket match before but it seemed so odd, i dont really fully understand the game but the people playing (especially inians) were playing more than a game, for them it seemed like they were playing for their country and it was a great honor to them. unlike a sport like soccer where people play for other countries teams.