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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Leadership Think Tank
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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon, Aki Puustinen
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Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:13 AM

Geographic data can be so beautiful...you've got to watch this.  I wish I have seen this when I wrote my National Geographic article on how container ships are transforming the global economy.  

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Navigate | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 2015 12:45 PM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:41 AM

Summer reading KQ3 What are the major contributing factors to environmental change today? key concept of transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:11 AM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Detroit by Air

Detroit by Air | Navigate | Scoop.it
The stark contrast between the haves and have-nots is apparent from above, so too is the city’s rebound.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 7, 2014 9:18 PM

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the U.S. with a booming population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As the de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledDetroit was $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive. The tax base shrunk, city services were spread thin and in 2013, Detroit filed for bankruptcy.  Today, some parts of Detroit are rebounding well while others are in absolute disarray.  These differences can, in part, be understood by using aerial photography and a spatial perspective.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Dennis Swender's curator insight, December 10, 2014 4:23 PM

A multicultural research project:  by foot, by car, or by plane

Select your site:  Detroit?  Kansas City? Feguson? New York?

Take some pictures.  Start observing.  Interview some people.  Assemble some facts.   Justify your opinions. 

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:16 PM

Deindustrialization and globalization are some of the reason why Detroit fluctuates configurations in the geography of manufacturing. The reduction of production in the car industry and all activities along with it is harmful to Detroit’s citizens, leaving a lot of workers without jobs. Globalization was adopted and American companies became attracted to the very low wages of workers in other countries that produce similar quality products as the US. Unfortunately, since globalization became the preferred option for the US, deindustrialization in Detroit rapidly increased. On the other hand, with the continuing advancements in technology, it turns out to be manageable with a few employees. Wealthy Detroiters sprawl out in the suburbs out of the city.  Due to the elimination of manufacturing jobs and relocation of residents out of the state, Detroit city remains with a population of 700,000 people. The effect of deindustrialization has been devastating, not only for workers, but also for the city itself. The regions with the lowest population rate will find it hard to survive with the increase of infrastructure and less income in taxes.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

"nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke..."


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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:57 PM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion.