Navigate
3.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Navigate
Explore places, objects and phenomenons.
Curated by Suvi Salo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping the World's Problems

Mapping the World's Problems | Navigate | Scoop.it
Google Earth Engine works with scientists by using satellite imagery to provide data visualizations for environmental and health issues.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Todd Hallsten's comment, February 13, 2015 10:39 PM
I like the idea of this map because it allows for the comparison of logged forest to preserved forest. Allowing for facts not rumored amount of trees producing air, i would really like to see a map of alaska..
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 16, 2015 12:23 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos?

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos? | Navigate | Scoop.it
The view from above.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 2015 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 2015 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 2015 6:37 PM
It sure is!
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time | Navigate | Scoop.it

"It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, August 26, 2014 6:42 PM

This is a great demonstration of human impacts on ecosystems. 7 locations in the world show dramatic change over time.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:19 AM

the Impact of HEI

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Navigate | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, June 2, 2015 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Windows on Earth

Windows on Earth | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.  These images  help astronauts share their experience, and help you see Earth from a global perspective."

 

Tags: images, art, space, remote sensing, geospatial.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 2015 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 19, 2015 12:06 AM
www.bharatemployment.com
Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 AM

It just doesn't get much cooler than this!

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Does Earth Look Like?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video covers various topics important to mapping and satellite imagery (and alesson from an APHG teacher on how to use this video with other resources).  There is so much more to the world and space than what we can see see.  Chromoscope, referenced in the video, simulates other forms of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum besides just visible light.  This type of information is at the core of the science behind all of our satellite imagery.  This video also covers many map projection issues and highlights online resources to understand map distortion including:

Google’s Mercator Map PuzzleJason Davies’ interactive map projection websiteInteractive Gnomonic Projectionand the military's live rendering of what the Earth looks like right now.  
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Navigate | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 2014 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:44 PM

APHG-U2

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.