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Curated by Suvi Salo
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Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate | Navigate |

"For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."

Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 21, 1:38 PM

This still image above doesn't do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources.  On #DarwinDay, it is important to consider the connections between biology and geography; many of the greatest biological discoveries were spatial and geographic in nature.   


Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education!

The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."

Via Seth Dixon
Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM


Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education!

The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | Navigate |
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

Via Seth Dixon
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:44 PM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 2014 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from STEM Connections!

The Great Barrier Reef

"Australia urged the UN's World Heritage Committee to keep the Great Barrier Reef off the 'in danger' list to protect their tourism industry. But that doesn't mean the ecological treasure is not in danger."


Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:38 AM
World Heritage for Year 7
Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:29 PM

Great article for the GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Chris Costa's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:27 PM

I have enjoyed the emphasis on the human aspect of geography in this course, and how geography impacts us. However, as much as the world influences us, we do have a substantial amount of influence on the composition of the planet, oftentimes for the worse. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the greatest wonders of the world, home to some of the most spectacular sights one can see; as someone who has been scuba diving a handful of times, I can only imagine what it must be like to explore such a world below the surface, seeing all the life that surrounds me. I would love to be able to at some point in my life, but there is a great probability that I might never get the opportunity, as the reef is dying- fast. 50% of the reef has been lost over the past 3 decades, and while Australia has pledged to reserve over a billion dollars to fund conservation efforts, it might be a case of too little, too late. Man-made climate change as a whole is taking a toll on one of nature's greatest treasures, and it might be out of the hands of the Australian damage to reverse the damage that has already been done. I would love to have the opportunity to see this one day, and I hope I get to, but I don't know if I ever will if current rates of reef loss continue. Here's to hoping humanity gets it act together and tries to save the geography we often take for granted; we won't like the ugly landscapes that will follow if we don't.

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Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) - Animals - Plants - Pictures & Information

Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) - Animals - Plants - Pictures & Information | Navigate |
The Encyclopedia of Life is an unprecedented effort to gather scientific knowledge about all animal and plant life where pictures, information, facts, and mo...

Via John Dalziel, Lynnette Van Dyke
John Dalziel's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:16 PM

What is EOL? - Information and pictures of all species known to science, it is an Encyclopedia of Life.
Knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere.
EOL's dream is to gather it all together and make it available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice.